Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 74

Thread: New (to me) Logan 200

  1. #1
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    New (to me) Logan 200

    I was trying to avoid another “project”, but I really wanted to find a lathe, this one was close, and the price was right.

    From the serial number, it’s a real oldie – 1943 timeframe. It’s not real pretty, as the previous owner was in the middle of stripping the paint. It has some problems – the motor is poor (has to be kick started), the flat belt is definitely on the way out, the chuck appears worn, there’s a chewed up tumbler gear, and the feed drive gear on the back of the spindle has a chipped tooth. On the plus side, there isn’t a lot of play in the cross or compound slides, the spindle appears to turn smoothly, and all the castings appear fully intact. I hope to find some replacement parts to get everything working as it should.

    Can anyone please advise as to how to break the chuck loose? Should the back of the chuck be soaked in penetrating oil for a while? Are there any sort of locking screws to remove before trying to turn it off? Is it OK to lock the back gears in place and lightly “malletize” the chuck a bit? Are there other ways to stop the spindle from turning?

    Taking the spindle out to get the belt changed has me a bit concerned. This Logan has been running for 50+ years, and I sure don’t want to bust up anything important. Does anyone possibly know of specific instructions for getting the spindle out? From what I can tell, there’s a nut on the back and a cap on the front. Does it just slide out the front? Any advice would really be appreciated.

    I guess it’s time to pick up a gallon of WD-40 and few brass brushes. Plenty of parts to clean up.
    Tom
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Brass
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    City
    Connersville
    State
    Indiana
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    176
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Locking a lathe in the back gears is the time honored method of chuck removal. Proper chuck installation procedure calls for the final quarter turn to be a quick spin, which effectively locks it in place. The "lightly" malletizing (or any other "light") procedure will have no impact. Real effort has to be put into the process. A few jerks on a large adjustable wrench fitted over a chuck jaw usually works well. Unfortunately, the "process" has been know to pop teeth out of the backgears. Knowing where to stop comes from experience. Fortunately, I don't have that experience. At least not yet.

    Unless the lathe is very rusty, which yours isn't, I wouldn't expect penetrating oil to be much help. BTW, WD 40 is not a penetrating oil.

    Bill

  3. #3
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Bill,
    The possibility of busting up any of the main gears has me a bit concerned. I have to bolt the head back onto the bed to give it a try.
    Good point on the WD40. I was going to use that to clean up the grease and old goop. I have to go get some real penetrating oil.
    Thanks for the guidance.
    Tom


    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAlpine View Post
    Locking a lathe in the back gears is the time honored method of chuck removal. Proper chuck installation procedure calls for the final quarter turn to be a quick spin, which effectively locks it in place. The "lightly" malletizing (or any other "light") procedure will have no impact. Real effort has to be put into the process. A few jerks on a large adjustable wrench fitted over a chuck jaw usually works well. Unfortunately, the "process" has been know to pop teeth out of the backgears. Knowing where to stop comes from experience. Fortunately, I don't have that experience. At least not yet.

    Unless the lathe is very rusty, which yours isn't, I wouldn't expect penetrating oil to be much help. BTW, WD 40 is not a penetrating oil.

    Bill

  4. #4
    Brass
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    City
    Connersville
    State
    Indiana
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    176
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Tom, I'm totally sympathetic with your situation. Problem is, I don't know how to tell how much force is too much. For all I know, the busted backgears happen when a 6 ft bar is used.

    Bill

  5. #5
    Bronze Pacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    City
    Greenwood
    State
    NW La
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    443
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Fashion wooden wedges that you can feed between the back gears and the spindle gears. As you rotate the chuck for removal let the teeth take up the wedge to absorb the pressure. And some penetrating oil never hurt either...

  6. #6
    Plastic
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    City
    Snyder
    State
    Texas
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    23
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    25
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Hello Tom,

    The flat belt appears to be leather, if you have to replace it just cut it and get a kit cut to length and either glue or metal hinged coupled back together. I don't think it is necessary to remove spindle.

    The belt kits leather or canvas type can be seen on Ebay. Just make sure you get the right length, not the stretched length of the old belt.

    Others here can give better advise and more info with correct terminology.

    RWW

  7. #7
    Cast Iron stevecmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    City
    Smithville
    State
    Missouri
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    721
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    6
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Tom,

    If you do a search on this site (or Google) you find lots of info - some good, some not so good. As has been said already, the danger is breaking teeth on the back gear/bull gear. They will usually come off with a little persuasion, just be careful - no harsh whacks, use a deadblow hammer.

    Yes, remove the gear and nut on the left side of the spindle. There is also a set screw (sometimes two back to back) in the cone pulley. The the spindle assembly goes out the right hand side. It will probably be stuck as well. I had to make a puller assembly using heavy all thread rod thru the spindle.

    If you remove the spindle I would recommend replacing the leather belt with an automotive serpentine belt. It will give you much better grip on the pulleys.

    It looks like a nice lathe and in decent shape. Good luck.

    Steve
    Logan Model 815 lathe
    Rockwell Model 21-100 Mill
    Atlas 7b Shaper (currently in kit form)
    Crescent Wrench
    Hammer

  8. #8
    Plastic
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    City
    Hanover
    State
    Pennsylvania
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    42
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Looks like you found a good Winter project. Another product that has not been mentioned is Loc-tite brand 'Freeze and Release' my gunsmith and I have been having good luck with it on lower receiver and hand screws on double guns.It freezes the part to minus'something' and puts a very thin lube in the joint.We haven't lost a screw yet.I've even started using it on lathe part teardowns.I have several tumbler assemblies for your Logan and alot of misc. parts from a school system inventory that's 25yrs.old.You need a parts book to identify and give me part #'s. If that gear you mentioned is the spindle gear I have one NOS. Get a list togeather and send me a PM if I can be of Help.--David

  9. #9
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Just got back the computer – lots of good info here…

    The only progress I made today was picking up some penetrating oil, a can of WD40, some soft metal brushes and a metal wash pan. When at Tractor Supply I saw a large hangar rod connecting nut that looked just small enough for one of my larger sockets. I thought that might work in the jaws of the chuck as a turning point so that I don’t beat up that old chuck any more than it already is. Also, that will limit me to a 2’ breaker bar, so less chance of me doing something too silly. I do appreciate all the advice on chuck removal. The chuck may not actually be stuck; I just have to get things back together to find out. More to follow on that in a few days.

    Steve – As to spindle removal, I believe you mentioned setscrews in the cone pulley. I found one setscrew hole and one oil port in the stepped belt cone. It appears a little odd to me that all the torque from the pulley gets carried thru one screw (?). I’m really not understanding this quite yet.

    Rwwells – I’m warming up to the idea of using a split belt. I’m a real novice, and maybe I’ll try and get some use out of this machine before I bugger up anything important. I guess it comes down to how badly I want to clean all the goo out of the head. I’m still thinking about which way to go. The chip in the tooth on the spindle gear isn’t real bad, so taking the spindle apart isn’t a functional priority yet, unless I do really badly on the chuck removal.

    Stonehands – I’ve never heard of “freeze and release” – sounds real handy. When looking at the rack under the edge of the bed, I was really wishing I could take out the flat head screws to paint things up a little nicer. Those screws look like brass, and I’m concerned about chewing them up. If I get brave, I may give the freeze and release a try.

    It looks like I only have an hour or so before I have to get things ready for work tomorrow. I’ll try to update later in the week.

    Thanks to all for the advice.
    Tom

  10. #10
    Plastic
    Join Date
    May 2011
    City
    Beverly Hills
    State
    Michigan
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    47
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Removing the spindle is not that big a deal and then you can more closely inspect bearings and races. I replaced the leather with a serpentine automotive belt...big improvement.

  11. #11
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Update:

    The chuck came off without too much trouble. I decided to start with what I thought would be the lowest load on the gears, and work my way up from there, if needed. I used a 1/2 inch wratchet with an impact socket tied to a long hex nut (threaded rod connector) locked in the chuck. Spun the cone by hand then pulled back on the handle. I tried it 2x with no luck, but my weight lifter son had no trouble at all. It was likely more speed and coordination, but he's stronger, faster and more coordinated, so who knows.

    Unfortunately, the nose of the spindle is a real mess. Someone bored into it a few times, and the largest cutout nibbled away a little more than an 1/8 inch off the nose. I was a bit disgusted (Newbie error - never thought to look). It can possibly be repaired, but it won't be easy. It certainly has to come out.

    I started pulling things apart, and that thing is in there tight. I tried some light "persuasion" with a block of soft wood and a rubber mallet, but I believe a puller is going to be needed. Steve/Stevecmo - if you can describe how you braced against the headstock, I would appreciate hearing about any puller setup that worked. I was thinking about some 2x4's along the bed as spacers, a plate with a hole on the end, and a 3/4 threaded rod.
    I can't recall the specific web site, but I do recall reading about having to line up the gear key with a slot in the inner bearing cover. Any other things to watch out for?
    Does it help to apply a little heat to the front bearing area? The paint is gone anyway, but not sure how much I could get away with before causing problems.
    Does anyone know if spindles from other Logan models may also fit the model 200?

    Hopefully, this thing won't have to sit too long.
    TomKro

  12. #12
    Cast Iron stevecmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    City
    Smithville
    State
    Missouri
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    721
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    6
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Tom,

    I think you have the idea of how the puller works. I first tried using 2x4's and they didn't cut it. I took a 1/2" x 3" bar and bent it into a "U" so the so of the "U" would fit around the boss on the front of the headstock. Then I used a 1/2" x 3" bar with a hole in it to span the legs of the "U". I used 3/4" all thread thru the hole and I think just heavy flat washers on the left side.

    I used lots of penetrating oil around the front bearing / casting. Then just start cranking slowly. It'll break loose. Pine Sol is the best for cleaning the bearings. Just douche until all the dried grease and gunk comes out. Then wash with hot soapy water then blow dry with compressed air. DO NOT spin the bearing with the compressed air - it will ruin the races. Then just a little oil until you're ready to grease and assemble.

    Steve
    Logan Model 815 lathe
    Rockwell Model 21-100 Mill
    Atlas 7b Shaper (currently in kit form)
    Crescent Wrench
    Hammer

  13. #13
    Plastic
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    City
    Hanover
    State
    Pennsylvania
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    42
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Tom, I made a trip to the shop today,and found of all things, a Logan spindle with the front bearing assembly. Perfect spindle threads and what should be a good bearing. These parts came off of school machines in the 70's and never were used in a production shop.Let me know if you want me to ship the 3 gears and the spindle or you want to drive out,I have a show(gun) that I'm working this weekend but if I ship tomorrow AM you might have them this week-end.--David

  14. #14
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Steve - I really like the idea of the U shaped bar. I don't think I have anything big enough to shape 1/2 x 3, but maybe I can weld up some iron pipe and flat stock to duplicate the general idea. I'm always looking for an excuse to dig out the little Hobart.

    Stonehands - That's very good news on the spindle, I'll PM you shortly.

    Many Thanks,
    TomKro

  15. #15
    Cast Iron stevecmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    City
    Smithville
    State
    Missouri
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    721
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    6
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Tom,

    I'm sure the 1/2" bar is way overkill. I would think 1/4" or 3/16" would be plenty stout if that makes it easier.

    Steve
    Logan Model 815 lathe
    Rockwell Model 21-100 Mill
    Atlas 7b Shaper (currently in kit form)
    Crescent Wrench
    Hammer

  16. #16
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Spindle Removal Update: I couldn’t find anything suitable for bending up flat bar to make a U shaped bracket for a puller, so I splurged and mail ordered a short piece of 5 inch schedule 40 aluminum pipe and a short piece of flatstock. See attached pic for the setup.

    Spindle removal was quite the job. It turns out that the bearing fit really wasn’t the major problem. The bull gear was hung up on some deformation from the locking screw. I had to use flat bars between the hub of the bull gear and the inside of the headstock to hold the gear back as the spindle was pulled out (the white wooden stick in the image didn’t hold up very long). I ended up using two layers of 1/8 x 5/8 flatstock on each side of the gear hub to prevent the gear teeth from jamming into the case. I had to work the spindle backand forth about 5x before it came out. The gear was on so tight that the threads on the 5/8 inch threaded rod were starting to give out, and I had to straighten the flat bars a few times along the way.

    Anyway, the spindlefinally made it out. The next problem is getting the capture nut off the spindle. There’s a slot for some sort of spanner wrench (which I don’t have), and so far I can’t break it loose with a pin and a big hammer. It’s presently soaking in penetrating oil.

    Holding the spindleis also a bit of a problem. I held it in a vise with soft jaws, trapping the key in the soft jaws to try to stop the shaft from turning. The grip was some what marginal.

    Any ideas for breaking the capture nut loose? I’m not aware of the name of the wrench used, but I think I need to get one before I do any more damage to the slot in the capture nut.
    Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance, TomKro
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    City
    Moundsville
    State
    West Virginia
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    392
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    5
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Did you ever get the nut off?
    Can you put the spindle in some soft jaws, and bump the nut loose with a punch in a air hammer?

  18. #18
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    mrbreezeet1:

    No luck getting the nut off yet. I now have the proper spanner wrench, and I re-installed the rear gear to grip the assembly in a vise, but still had problems. I had the gear gripped with soft jaws, but my soft jaws are way too soft (almost rubbery), and just can't hold things in place. I made a trip to the local hardware store to look for some copper or lead sheet for the vise, but I haven't found anything yet. I guess I'll just wrap the jaws in a thick layer of aluminum tape and give it another try.

    Hadn't thought of using an air hammer. I'll try again with just the wrench, and maybe just a little heat on the edge of the collar. If that doesn't do the trick, I know I have a worn out air chisel that maybe can be ground a little to fit the slot. Thanks for the idea.

    I used up most of this weekend on lawn work and taxes, but I think I hear Logan calling from the basement...

    Thanks again, TomKro





    Quote Originally Posted by mrbreezeet1 View Post
    Did you ever get the nut off?
    Can you put the spindle in some soft jaws, and bump the nut loose with a punch in a air hammer?

  19. #19
    Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    City
    Rochester
    State
    Minnesota
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    551
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Tom---I was reading your post and was wondering if you used the push in slide spindle lock (on front to the left of your id plate) ? that is what I use to lock the spindle to knock the chuck loose. to unlock it you have to push the release spring on bottom of slide up as you pull the handle out. I noticed that no one else mentioned that as a spindle lock is why I'm mentioning it. I use it also to lock the spindle when I spin mount my chuck. Dave I really like my logan 200

  20. #20
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    City
    Moundsville
    State
    West Virginia
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    392
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    5
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Smith View Post
    Tom---I was reading your post and was wondering if you used the push in slide spindle lock (on front to the left of your id plate) ? that is what I use to lock the spindle to knock the chuck loose. to unlock it you have to push the release spring on bottom of slide up as you pull the handle out. I noticed that no one else mentioned that as a spindle lock is why I'm mentioning it. I use it also to lock the spindle when I spin mount my chuck. Dave I really like my logan 200
    Are you sure your not talking about engaging the back gear with the bull gear still locked to the cone pulley?

  21. #21
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    City
    Moundsville
    State
    West Virginia
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    392
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    5
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbreezeet1 View Post
    Are you sure your not talking about engaging the back gear with the bull gear still locked to the cone pulley?
    also sounds like your rod is installed wrong. Should pull out to engage,

    No, maybe you did say pull out?
    Last edited by mrbreezeet1; 04-08-13 at 04:57 PM.

  22. #22
    Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    City
    Rochester
    State
    Minnesota
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    551
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    yes you both are right--I pull the knob out to lock it and is this the correct method for me to use? I've never had a problem doing it this way for the 30 yrs I've used it and I have never had to bang hard on my chuck to release it. thanks for your info. Dave --note **My lathe was missing the back gear in my lathe since I bought it--I did buy a back gear last year for it with some broken teeth, but I need to fix them before installing it on my shaft.
    Last edited by Dave Smith; 04-08-13 at 03:52 PM. Reason: to add more

  23. #23
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Dave Smith:

    From this and your previous post, it appears that you locked the spindle by using the back gear and engaging the pin in the bull gear. I didn't quite understand how that would fully lock the spindle if your lathe didn't have the back gear installed, but maybe I misunderstood. I'm guessing that with the drive belt engaged, there would be resistance to spindle motion.

    To clarify what I did to loosen the chuck from my spindle, please realize that my lathe was (still is) in pieces, so no belt was attached. I was concerned about damaging the bull gear, so I started with the back gear engaged, but the bull gear disengaged. I spun the cone (and the back gear) by hand, and then snapped the chuck backwards. I was guessing that the load on the bull gear from the inertia of spinning the cone was less than the load the gear teeth would see if I locked everything up and twisted hard on the chuck. In hindsight, I certainly over-analyzed the situation.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Smith View Post
    yes you both are right--I pull the knob out to lock it and is this the correct method for me to use? I've never had a problem doing it this way for the 30 yrs I've used it and I have never had to bang hard on my chuck to release it. thanks for your info. Dave --note **My lathe was missing the back gear in my lathe since I bought it--I did buy a back gear last year for it with some broken teeth, but I need to fix them before installing it on my shaft.

  24. #24
    Brass burnrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    City
    Oregon City
    State
    Oregon
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    228
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    1
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Chuck removal only. Anything wrong with chucking up a nut, using an impact wrench with a gloved hand on the pulleys for some resistance? No risk to the back gear/bull gear- some to the chuck itself.
    Logan 200 Lathe owner since 1975

  25. #25
    Brass
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    City
    cumming
    State
    Georgia
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    109
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Thats going to be really nice when its all finished!!

  26. #26
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Very sorry for the late reply.

    burnrider: It sounds like your idea of holding the cone and using an impact wrench would be best for minimizing the potential for gear damage. It makes sense to me to start at the lowest potential for damage, and work your way up, if needed.

    robert1352: Thanks for the encouragement, but sometimes I feel like I'm taking two steps backward for each step forward.

    When I pulled the headstock apart, I snapped off an easy out trying to remove the setscrew from the cone oiler port. Last week I visited a few machine shops in the area, but no one in town has a EDM machine to burn it out. At least I was given a contact for a place with an EDM that isn't too far away.

    I'm still trying to get the capture nut off the spindle. I gripped the spindle via the sides of the bull gear, used a little heat on the nut, and still no luck. I was gripping it hard (no soft jaws) and I still couldn't hold it (gear popping out of the vise). I have to order some brass or something with a little give, and try the air hammer as suggested by mrbreezee1.

    The good news is that I'm taking a road trip to see stonehands next week. With a little luck, the parts he hunted around for will match what I have. Many thanks stonehands, you've been a huge help.

    If I can just get done with the yard work and finish the car maintenance, I can get back to breaking Logan parts.

  27. #27
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    City
    Moundsville
    State
    West Virginia
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    392
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    5
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Quote Originally Posted by TomKro View Post

    I can get back to breaking Logan parts.
    LOL

  28. #28
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Mini Update on the sloooow Logan effort:

    I found a local shop to burn the broken "easy out" from my flat belt cone. They did a beautiful job at a very reasonable price. They "upsized" to a 5/16 thread, and salvaged the part.

    Per mrbreezeet1's idea, I used an air chisel to break loose the capture nut on the spindle bearing. Three or four hits and it was off. Thanks mrbreezeet1, for the help. Holding the bull gear tight in a vise was part of the problem. I ended up using 0.093 inch, 6x6 lead sheet from an industrial supplier to make a decent set of soft jaw covers. The 0.093 inch material cut easy with a chisel and was easy to shape, in case anyone else has to do this.

    Also, I got lucky on a Craigslist deal. I was still hunting for an inexpensive spindle that I could use, and needed to replace some carriage parts. A fellow up in Trenton NJ had a partial model 210 headstock and a carriage for sale. The headstock looked a little rough, but the spindle came out easy and looks usable. The carriage was not from the same machine, and appears to be in excellent condition - almost no play, not even any dirty grease. It's so nice, I think I'll swap most of the parts onto my nasty old saddle, and save the good saddle in case I ever get the bed cleaned up. It's just too nice to bugger up. It was a 4 hour drive, but it worked out well.

    Can anyone please provide guidance on bearing repacking? The main spindle bearing is sealed on one side, and I didn't know if the cover can be removed and replaced? If not, can a bearing be properly hand packed from one side? I was trying to get the bearing off the spindle, but I'll need to have some sort of tool made up to push against the inner edge of the bearing. There isn't much exposed past the shoulder on the spindle nose, so I'm concerned about damaging the bearing. Since the spindle is out, I was thinking of just soaking the whole end of the spindle and repacking the bearing by hand with the bearing in place (?). Any thoughts/guidance?

    Thanks in advance, TomKro

    Retainer Removal Tool.jpgNew Spindle 002 small.jpgNew Spindle 003 small.jpg

  29. #29
    Cast Iron stevecmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    City
    Smithville
    State
    Missouri
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    721
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    6
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Hi Tom,

    Glad to see you're making some progress! If the bearing is in good shape there is no reason to remove it from the spindle. Yes, you can hand pack it with grease while on the spindle - not a problem at all. You only need to only pack between 1/4 and 1/3 full - don't fill with grease. Use a good bearing grease. If I remember correctly I opted for the high dollar Kluber to be on the safe side.

    Good luck and keep us posted.

    Steve
    Logan Model 815 lathe
    Rockwell Model 21-100 Mill
    Atlas 7b Shaper (currently in kit form)
    Crescent Wrench
    Hammer

  30. #30
    Brass
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    City
    Aberdeen
    State
    Maryland
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    118
    Tickets
    0
    Post Thanks / Like
    Chats
    0
    Total Downloaded
    0
    My Feedback

    (0% Positive Feedback)

    Re: New (to me) Logan 200

    Steve -

    Thanks for the bearing packing guidance. I have some cleanup work to do on the spindle, so I'll work that before soaking/repacking the bearing. I know I have some decent bearing grease laying around somewhere. It might be 5 or 6 years old, but it has to be better than the 20?, 30? year old grease that's in there now.

    Now that I have usable spindle parts, I'm getting fired up to make some progress. I still have my fingers crossed, because who knows what might happen when throwing together headstock parts from a few different machines.

    The weather was really nice yesterday on the 4th, so I stripped paint from the bed and the bed risers. Headstock and tailstock are next. I can't wait to get it painted and start putting things together.

    Thanks, TomKro
    Attached Images Attached Images

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Installing a Logan QCGB. Logan 9B to 400 adaptation.
    By mjhenks in forum SHELDON, LOGAN & ROCKWELL MACHINES
    Replies: 82
    Last Post: 05-28-14, 01:45 PM
  2. DRO on a Logan 200?
    By Cason in forum SHELDON, LOGAN & ROCKWELL MACHINES
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-11-14, 01:59 PM
  3. new (old) logan 920
    By s1dev in forum SHELDON, LOGAN & ROCKWELL MACHINES
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 02-09-14, 01:18 AM
  4. Another 820 Logan
    By Scruffy in forum SHELDON, LOGAN & ROCKWELL MACHINES
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-22-13, 08:34 PM
  5. Logan 820
    By Charley Davidson in forum SHELDON, LOGAN & ROCKWELL MACHINES
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-08-12, 06:44 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •