1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. There are some site issues which I am working on. There may be reduced functionality in some modules while I do. Thank you for your patience.

    Dismiss Notice

[How do I?] 1980 Bridgeport Series 1

Discussion in 'MACHINE RESTORATION & WAY SCRAPING' started by AxeMaker, Aug 26, 2016.

  1. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    Hello,

    My Bridgeport was delivered Monday and I have not had a chance to do much to it other than a cursory once over. I noted a couple obvious problems with the quill stop and fine movement wheel, or lack thereof, below.

    The power feed is totally botched, at a minimum the controls are. I am hoping the motor is still good.

    Is there a concise document that I can use as a check list of things to check operationally and their order?

    MILL TOP - MISSING PARTS.png


    MILL POWER FEED.png

    MILL POWER FEED 2.png

    MILL SERVO MOTOR.png

    Power Feed Motor.png
     
  2. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    It is pretty rare to find a machine with the handwheel, they normally get lost because they are never used. The little roller knob for the quill feed For/Rev is missing, this is pretty common also, the quick fix is the screw in the end of the shaft as shown. I'm not seeing a missing screw in the quill stop, it looks normal. The clip on the bottom of the quill stop screw is normally a bit loose from use. You have to replace those sometimes, or just squeeze them back together a bit. The quill stop screw should be free to move up and down. I notice that the quill is locked. If it has to be locked to keep the quill from falling then the return spring is broken, and needs to be replaced.

    Yeah, pretty much. Looks like a complete teardown and wiring replacement is in order.

    Not that I know of.
     
  3. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    352
    Trophy Points:
    83
    City:
    Stoughton
    State:
    Wisconsin

    -Return to Top-

    Check out the Downloads section of our site. There are some good documents to reference there for Bridgeports.

    Bridgeport Downloads

    Also, even if you are not doing a complete rebuild this manual is excellent for all the details of maintaining and repairing. It is great for just basic machine operation and how it works. The material is priceless and well worth the money. I highly recommend you get a copy.

    Guide to Bridgeport Renovation
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2016
    uncle harry, brino and JimDawson like this.
  4. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-


    Thank you Randy. I was hoping to not having to spend the $20 for it. I will bite the bullet after I get a VFD and get it powered up. I've been downloading a bunch of files from the download area, it has good info!
     
  5. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    Hi Jim,

    The quill returns okay, so I the spring is good. The mill was being used in the shop a day or two before I purchased it so I know it is working okay for the most part. Its just figuring out what needs to tweaked, fixed, or replaced.

    The screw I mentioned in the quill stop was shown in the manual. Maybe it was just there as a "lock" for shipment and it gets removed during initial setup?

    Why is the hand wheel rarely used?
     
  6. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,093
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Tucson
    State:
    Arizona

    -Return to Top-

    There are a couple of common quill stops, the most common uses and upper indicator adjustment and a lower threaded locking ring. The other type has a quick release button on the depth indicator knob to allow one to depress the button and quickly slide it along the threaded shaft. You seem to have the latter which is missing the button, and has been adapted to the original style. Replacement: http://www.grizzly.com/products/Quick-Quill-Stop/G7316

    The quill fine down feed wheel is missing, which is not uncommon as it slides on/off the shaft. As Jim mentioned some people use it (mostly used for slow feeding of larger drills and cutters), others do not, or it just gets lost through the years. Replacement http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Origina...embly-for-Bridgeport-BP-12193519/162129266511
     
    brino likes this.
  7. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    The screw shown in the manual is behind the quill stop screw, you can't see it but it's there. It secures the quill stop to the quill.

    They are pretty much useless, in 50 years I have never used one. I may actually have one around here somewhere.:)
     
  8. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    I tried to post this earlier but I think because I was not logged in when I refreshed the screen I lost it... So if this info is redundant I apologize.

    I was wrong about the quill. It does not return. The set screw is missing from the quill handle so it just slides off. There appears to be a plate with holes in a 360º circle on the plate... I assume that screws off and the spring is behind it?

    Why doesnt anyone use the fine adjustment wheel? I use the one of my import mill a lot, especially when drilling.
     
  9. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    Don't expect the quill to return like a drill press. The purpose of the spring is to just counterbalance the quill. At full extension it may retract for only about 75% of the travel and you may have to pull it up the final 25% or so. If the quill just falls or has no spring return at all, then the spring is broken.

    Depending on the design, you may need a bearing ball and spring under the set screw to engage with the groove in the hub. There are a number of aftermarket quill levers, and that one does not look like original BP.

    Yes. There should be a few Youtube videos showing the replacement process.

    In my opinion it is easier to ''feel'' the process using the quill handle. And generally you have more control rather than using the hand wheel.
     
  10. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    155
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    wood dale
    State:
    Illinois

    -Return to Top-

    Congrats on the new to you machine. There may be very compelling arguments for the other machines but IMO you cant go wrong with the classic BP. I would consider just getting a servo 140 feed or clone of. vs messing with fixing the original power feed. I think need for repair and adjustment of the flat springs on the BP quill is very common. It was one of the few things I needed to fix when I brought mine home. Would have been much easier having the repair manual when taking it apart though. A little head scratching and mechanical common sense later I was able to get it back together and working but that darn spring popped and unwound on me several times. About the fine quill feed hand wheels, I agree not many people use them and they get lost or tossed. Thats why when I went to look at my mill and saw it had one still attached I knew that machine was a keeper! I looked for quite awhile to find one that wasn't abused, neglected, clapped out and needing a total overhaul. Check out this tool porn. Original paint....
    41596de61e5868cd4af5be3990233353.jpg eb5e70b83cbf6bfddb036add2e16a82a.jpg 00d0620c22e8b53ec27dee1f8149d02c.jpg 2899773ad167da07c9d3be214f8e011b.jpg 4721e95da381c9a6674b6753f763e4d1.jpg bf94a2546d87ea1e6dfc00933a83b50d.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  11. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-


    Hi Cheeseking,

    Wow, was it even used when you got it? Very nice machine!

    Mine has a lot of mileage on it because it was used to make jigs etc... for the company's big cnc machines. I was in awe the first time I went to look at this machine because of all of their equipment. I bought it from Tucker Technologies in Tucker, GA. and they are about 20 miles from me. Here is a LINK to their equipment list. They make and refurbish jet engine turbine blades. It is a plain jane brick building and from the street you would not think all that equipment would be in there.

    I found this at Amazon.com ; 2 Spoked Black Powder Coated Aluminum Dished Hand Wheel, 5" Diameter, 3/8" Hole Diameter. It comes with the handle and it is made very well. The handle it came with is a metal revolving handle! Best of all it was only $11.96.

    Amazon.com also had the Bridgeport BP 12193433 Feed-Reverse Knob. Now all I need to do is drill the wheel to the appropriate diameter, drill the hole for the pin and done. I wonder if anyone has ever drilled out the pin hole to a larger size, tap it and the wheel then run a thumb or other type of screw into it to hold it in place? The same size screw that the feed reverse knob has could be used for the tapped pin hole. Just a thought :encourage:.

    I have a question for anyone reading this... I dropped a tram ring on the table and hooked up my dial test. If you are standing in from the of mill, the table looks like it has four bars with t-slots between them. The back three bars are flush, but the bar in the front closest to the operator was high.

    HighTable.png
     

    Attached Files:

  12. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-


    Define ''high''. Is that condition the same for the length of the table, or is it just local to the center(ish) section?
     
  13. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    155
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    wood dale
    State:
    Illinois

    -Return to Top-

    So does the tram ring sit flat without rocking? ie- your not sitting on a ding or burr in the table top. How much is it out .001 or .100 ? Gib locks on the knee/table tight? If everything else is good you may need to adjust the nod of the head slightly to eliminate the "high" in front.
    Not sure which X feed unit you have but BP/Hardinge website has the exploded diagrams and parts list. 6F and 8F? If not there's tons of places on the web to find a manual may even have one here in the downloads section. As far as a "how to" instruction I'm not sure but I recall a guy selling step by step BP rebuilding manual.
    Here some links might help you
    http://bbssystem.com/viewtopic.php?t=62&sid=67c0345201a33d44227495a4c701b38d
    http://cncmanual.com/bridgeport-j-head-series-i-mill-rebuild/ (has a section on the quill which might be useful to you)

    I stumbled across my mill on CL at a vocational HS that was shutting down their machine shop and selling all the equipment. Anecdotaly I was told the machine was only used by the instructors but who knows. I use mine but definitely keep it cleaned and oiled.
     
  14. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    When the dial tester swings around from 8 O'Clock around to 4 O'Clock the height s the same. Once it passes 4 O'Clock and hits the closest bar (between 5 O'clock and 7 O'Clock ) the dial test shows that part of the table is higher than the rest of the table.
     
  15. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-


    Best I can tell the tram ring does sit flat with no rocking. However ! I did not try to slip a gauge in between the ring and the table. That would have shown a gap if the front is indeed higher, which I believe it is. What I did was really more of a cursory check and I was not trying to measure the difference to the thousandth .

    Also to answer Jim, I did not check the entire table just the table centered under the quill. I would need to go out in the garage to check which gauge I was using rather what the measurement of the gauge.
     
  16. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    OK, based on your description so far it seems the the head is just slightly out of tram. Doesn't sound like a table problem. If it's within 0.001 or so, it's close enough. You could chase zeros, but will never be perfect.
     
  17. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    If you imagine the slots have numbers, rear slot #3, middle #2 and front slot #1... As the indicator passes #2 towards #1 it begins to move on either side of the tram ring.

    I know I am going to get this wrong... My indicator measures .0001 and the indicator showed 34 on the dial. So that would be .0034 , or .00034? I always get it confused.
     
  18. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    I'm going to say it's reading 0.0034 unless you have 5 digits.

    Check the readings at 12, 6 and 3, 9 Don't worry about 4, 8. So far it really sounds like the ''nod'' is off a bit. You just need to adjust it. After traveling, if the head was in tram I would be amazed.

    To adjust the nod, loosen the three bolts (blue arrow), and adjust using the worm screw (red arrow)

    To adjust the rotation, loosen the four bolts on the front of the head (green arrow) and adjust using the adjuster screw (cyan arrow)

    upload_2016-9-3_6-54-14.png
     
  19. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    Thank you ! This will help tremendously. I agree it is probably just out of tram. I don't remember the measurements, but on both sides there was an increase as the DT moved towards the front.
     
    JimDawson likes this.
  20. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

    Likes Received:
    19,156
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Tyler, Texas
    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Have you proven the tram ring? Rotated it 180° to see if the high spot stays?
     
    4gsr likes this.
  21. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    I rotated it during the check. I had run the check several times too. I guess the only thing I have not done is place on my inspection block.
     
    bss1 likes this.
  22. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

  23. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    Looks like it would work fine. I had one that looked just like it on my old mill. I know nothing about that particular manufacturer.
     
    AxeMaker likes this.
  24. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    155
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    wood dale
    State:
    Illinois

    -Return to Top-

    I do like the pump lever handle on that one vs the pull knob style on my bujur. I'm betting it will be tons cheaper also. Get yourself a gallon of Mobil Vactra 4 and you'll be set.
    I give mine several shots before using and work the table and saddle full travel to spread the oil around. If course a day later theres oil dripping out all over and pooling on the base casting that gets wiped clean.
     
  25. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    155
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    wood dale
    State:
    Illinois

    -Return to Top-

    I just noticed the one you posted is made by the same company Changhua Chen Ying (Taiwanese) as the one Tormach sold me with my pcnc1100. Not sure how good or bad it is yet but so far after 1+ yr of use it works fine, no issues, leaks etc. Oil is definitely gushing from every orifice on the mill that I know. If its a good price I'd say go with it
    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1473191773.035551.jpg
     
  26. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    It was $62.55 on eBay. The oiler that is on the mill now is the bujur with the pull knob. What caught my eye is the pump handle on this one like you mentioned.

    I have a couple gallons of Vactra on hand because of my import mill I have.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for a X-Axis Power Feed? I see quite a few on eBay, but I am not sure I want to just buy one out of the blue without some owner feedback etc...
     
  27. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-


    I do believe you can set the amount of oil that is dispersed with those electronic oilers. That might stop the overflow you are experiencing. I just went to the Tormac web site as I was typing this and I think that I may have found the one you have. According to the description you can adjust the stroke length and lessen the amount of oil that gets pumped into the ways.

     
  28. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    155
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    wood dale
    State:
    Illinois

    -Return to Top-

    $66 sounds like a winner. Perfect for a manual BP. The auto oilers are a couple hundred if i remember. You are correct tho they can be adjusted. I went that route because I am all about excess oil and intentionally have it set to gush. It really help keeping things clean and nice when your compelled to wipe it down frequently. Given the fairly low cost of way lube its cheap insurance. Having acquired and cleaned my share of grungy, neglected tools, it something you want to not let happen.
     
  29. AxeMaker

    AxeMaker United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Buford
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    So I received the oiler that I purchased. It is well made, mostly metal.
    The exceptions are the three items I noted in the pic below. All in all, for $62 not too bad.



    OIL PUMP.png
     
  30. TakeDeadAim

    TakeDeadAim H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    87
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Hartford
    State:
    Wisconsin

    -Return to Top-

    I have the exact pump pictured above and it works fine. Metering in manual oiling systems is usually done with a set of orifices that you can put into the lines leading to various areas on the machine. On large machines this is a real process when your volume is effected by distance from the pump etc. I just remember it taking me a week or so to get the system fine tuned on a large boring mill, (6x15' table with a 15' tall column). This was before electronic oiling systems of course. I find on this little manual pump you can regulate how much flows by how far you stroke the handle. If you run Vactra 4 in that pump the handle will take a bit to return to the normal position as the oil is quite viscous. I would not throw away the old Bujur. Someone like Keith Rucker at Vintage tools might like that for a restoration. Besides the staining of the plastic, which takes about six months, you can't kill one of those pumps. One plus of a Bridgeport is there are a ton of spare parts out there.
     

Share This Page