• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

Albrecht Chuck Problem

Howardd

Iron
Registered Member
#1
I have a 1/2" Albrech keyless chuck that has less than 5 hours on it, a year and a half old. When I tried to use it today in my mill the drill bit fell out. I tried it a couple of times with the same result. A couple of times I tried to pull the bit out with a pair of pliers before starting the mill and the bit held fast.

I brushed out the chuck to make sure the jaws were clean. Any idea what the problem outdoors be.

Thanks

Howard
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
Director
#2
Are you turning the spindle backwards by chance? Is the bit bottoming out in the chuck when tightening? This can prevent proper tightening.
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#3
The commonest cause for an Albrecht chuck to loosen in use is oil on the spindle threads. I suggest you pull it apart and clean the threads and the threaded section of the body with lacquer thinner to remove all traces of oil.
 

Heckle and Jeckle

Active Member
Active Member
#4
I would disassemble it as the very last resort. If in fact as mentioned above it is oil causing problems and it could be. And is supported because the chuck does clamp the bit, using lacquer thinner or mineral sprits, as an oil remover. Mineral sprits being preferred because it has a lubricating quality, where as lacquer thinner does not.

Put it in a pan jaws open and facing up poor it down the hole. Bathe it with a brush, should wash out any excess oil. Once dried hose it down with some WD, let it set to drain. Not necessary to take the chuck a part, would not take the chuck apart, no reason to take the chuck apart.
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#5
Albrecht recommends that the spindle threads be completely oil-free for proper functioning of the chuck. In addition, there are 25 ball bearings just in front of the spindle that do require lubrication for the chuck to function properly. So, while it is certainly optional to not take the chuck apart, its actually the only way to remove oil from the part that needs to be oil-free and leave the lubrication where it needs the lubrication.
 
Last edited:

tq60

Active Member
Active Member
#9
Notice the tray...

Do work in a pan or tray as you will get a surprise when opening the Chuck and the bearings depart.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

Bill Gruby

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#10
I use the tray also accompanied by a clear plastic bag large enough to get both hands in and work. Anything that decides to go elsewhere on its own stays in the bag where I can find it when the time comes. Haven't lost a small or large part since I started using the bag.

"Billy G"
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#11
I recall one Albrecht chuck I did - I dropped all 25 bearings on my garage floor FOUR times. If you saw my garage you would realize what a disaster this was. I found all of them with the help of a magnet on a stick but it wasn't that much fun. Whatever you can do to contain those little suckers, do it.
 
Last edited:

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#13
I've rebuilt 9 of these chucks and I was a total klutz with that one for some reason. Once I got it done and mounted on my drill press it runs with about 0.0005" of runout.
 

sanddan

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#14
I just got an Albrecht 1/2" chuck off ebay and when checking it has about .005" runout. It also feels "gritchy" so I plan on taking it apart to clean and inspect. Anything I should specifically check regarding the cause of the runout?
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#15
Run out can come from the spindle, arbor or the way the chuck is mounted to the arbor. Personally, when I get an Albrecht off ebay, I remove and replace the arbor with one I trust. I disassemble, clean and re-lube the chuck and then clean up the chuck and arbor tapers before remounting the chuck on the arbor. I must be paranoid but I prefer to trust an arbor I put in myself.
 

sanddan

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#16
It's not the spindle (I checked another chuck and got 0" runout) but could be the shank as it is used. I had planned on switching to a straight shank but want to make sure the runout issue is fixed first. I can see that removing the R8 shank should be easy using wedges but how do you remove one that has a straight shank? My other chuck with a 1/2" straight shank doesn't have a lip the wedge can push on.
 

sanddan

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#18
Thanks for the link Mike.

Unfortunately the link to the rest of the article doesn't work but it did cover the disassembly. Tom Lipton has a good video on this also but he didn't cover removing a straight shank but I'm sure it can be done.
 

coffmajt

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#19
I picked up a 1/2 in capacity chuck off e bay cheap, but when it arrived it was very rough to open or close, so I used the Tom Lipton rebuild video to take it apart and get it clean and lubricated only in the right places. The results were outstanding, it now opens and closes so smoothly that it is a pleasure to use and it holds tight on all that I have used it on. Please don't soak yours in solvents to try and "solve" a problem, because taking it apart is not that hard == Jack
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
Director
#20
Tom Lipton has a good video on this also but he didn't cover removing a straight shank but I'm sure it can be done.
Smack the arbor on the side, near the chuck end with a round steel shaft. It sets up a shockwave in the arbor that will loosen the taper. Yes, it puts a bit of a divot in the arbor, but that's what files are for.:)