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Error/accident Rates...

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astjp2

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#1
I am doing the research for my final paper for school, does anyone know what the accident/error rate is for a new employee vs. an experienced one is?






up to 12% for new
.7 for experienced

It just demonstrates that you cannot prevent all errors/accidents but some companies feel that they can eliminate them all. My current employer is doing this near miss program, people are writing up that a carpet corner (one of those throw rugs) was kicked up and they called facilities to come and fix the safety issue instead of bending over or kicking it back into place, but the OSHA and NFPA violation get ignored.....or at least marginalized. Just frustrates me to no end. Tim
 
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TOOLMASTER

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#2
the idiots I worked with yeeeeears ago thought it was a good plan to lose a hand to get 5000 bucks. didn't matter new or old.
 

4gsr

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#3
Guys, keep your messages nice and clean here. We are a "G" rated audience.
 

Uglydog

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#4
"up to 12% for new, .7 for experienced"

I'd be extremely interested in getting a link to this research data!

Daryl
MN
 

stupoty

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#5
I think you might need to separate or clarify accident vs mistake. It sounds a little vague to me. Every new guy puts the wrong staples in the big stapler but not all of them have an accident ?

In the UK most jobs have compulsory risk assessments to help avoid silly easily foreseen accidents from occurring. I was having fire training as part of an induction with one employer when I realized we were being told to spray the water extinguisher in the direction of a louvered door with "danger high voltage" signage on it, made me laugh a bit :)

Stuart
 

vtcnc

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#6
"up to 12% for new, .7 for experienced"

I'd be extremely interested in getting a link to this research data!

Daryl
MN
Agreed. That discrepancy is suspect when one considers the nature of real accidents.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
 

Baithog

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#7
I also have a problem with with statements of fact that include, 'as much as', 'could be', and so forth. If you don't know what the number is, then don't try to make your point with a guess. Untestable statements without conditions are meaningless.

In my experience, the poorly trained and inexperienced make more errors. Those that have been doing it for long enough to loose respect for the consequences have accidents.
 

Uglydog

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#8
Is this a course paper?
Program capstone?
Degree thesis? HS? Certificate, Associate, Bachelors, Masters, Phd, Other?

I believe that you will find that error identification and reduction is related to education, training, experience, work place culture, as well as socio-political-economics.
How far do you want to take this? It's difficult to discuss errors without an exploration or at least a definition of "quality" and tolerances.
While my focus has been emergency response (and a fascination of the parallels with machining and fab) I believe that other arenas aren't significantly different.

What have you got for sources thus far?
Is this original research or a meta-analysis?
How many pages?

Daryl
MN
 

planeflyer21

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#9
I'd believe rates like that.

When you look at statistics for motorcycle wrecks, the vast majority happen to two sub groups of riders: those who have been riding less than six months and those who have been riding a new motorcycle less than six months.

Make it past that initial half a year on a new bike or as a new rider, your chances for getting in an accident drop dramatically.
 

vtcnc

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#10
Where did this paper end up? Is it something that could be shared with those interested here on the forum?


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astjp2

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#11
I went to Alaska last week to do the interviews for people who work in Alaska, I ended up with 17 interviews. The number one concern was personal injury with frost bite. I will have to find the actual paper that I was referencing and post it. Tim
 
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