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Gloves in the shop

Roger Taylor

Swarf
Registered Member
#1
I recently conducted a welder personnel certification test for several welders at a local metal fabrication company. While supervising the test, there was a big hub-bub next store at the small tooling area. Here they had a lathe, mill, band saw and several other machine tools with one toolmaker staffing the shop. Apparently, this fellow was wearing mechanic type gloves and tried to flick a chip off of an end mill on the vertical mill. The result was the loss of the ends of two fingers when the glove material caught and was pulled into the machine tool. I have seen several of the on-line machine tool you-tubers work on rotating machinery with this type of gloved hand protection and feel that it sends a bad example to neophyte and experienced machinists as well. I spent 38 years teaching machine shop at the high school level and gloves were out of place when students left the welding or sheet metal area. Nitrile rubber gloves seem like a good alternative if you don't want to get your hands dirty but anything that can drag you into a rotating machine part should be a no no.

Old retired metal shop teacher
 

mark_f

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium
#2
I agree. I have seen too many fingers turned into hamburger over the years from people wearing gloves. :( I don't even like rubber or latex gloves as they dull the sense of feel. Feeling the vibrations in a machine running is important to me as you can tell a lot about what is going on. I often rest one hand somewhere on the machine so I can "feel" changes in it running. I think if you don't want dirty hands, you should not really aspire to be a machinist, but that is my opinion.
 

orjo

Active User
Active Member
#4
Here in Belgium we have to wear gloves at our work, even working on machines. I ones had an accident with a drill press. Tried to remove chips with my hand from the workpiece with the drill still running. I was wearing gloves and got caught by the drill, I did not lose any fingers only minor injury. The assurance company first asked if i was wearing gloves if I didn't i would not get payed for the days i was not able to work.
What I learned is the following. Your hands should never be near a piece that is turning. Want to remove chips? take a brush or use a tool to remove the chips.
 

Cactus Farmer

Active User
Active Member
#5
A few cuts and oil come wit the job........or be a cook! Not that I don't cook too but not with gloves either.........
I agree. I have seen too many fingers turned into hamburger over the years from people wearing gloves. :( I don't even like rubber or latex gloves as they dull the sense of feel. Feeling the vibrations in a machine running is important to me as you can tell a lot about what is going on. I often rest one hand somewhere on the machine so I can "feel" changes in it running. I think if you don't want dirty hands, you should not really aspire to be a machinist, but that is my opinion.
 

ogberi

Active User
Active Member
#6
gloves are for working with chemicals, not running machines. The only time I wear gloves working with power tools is with the welder, some grinding operations, and the chainsaw. Splinter/bug protection. If I pick up so much as a screwdriver, safety glasses go on.
 

David S

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#7
I think it is prudent to always brush off chips with a long handle brush and if necessary pull long chips out with smooth handle needle nose. I do wear disposable nitrile gloves when I am working on brass clock parts and plates. I hate getting them in for repair seeing previous repairers finger prints etched into the plates.

David
 

hermetic

Active User
Active Member
#9
with rotating machinery, rings off, watches off, sleeves rolled to the elbows, no loose clothing or necklaces, long hair tied back (the pic is me in the eighties, I now have dreads down to my Ar*e, which I have in a hairnet/old pair of tights at work.) and definitely NO GLOVES.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#10
The worst kind of gloves are the knitted fabric type. I saw a guy last year who got one of these hooked in a bandsaw and cut his hand off. It was reattached but functions poorly. Please be careful out there!
R
 

gi_984

Active User
Active Member
#11
Agreed: NO GLOVES! Had to "remind" a student who transferred into the machine tool program from the automative side. He kept on wanting to wear the mechanix brand gloves in the shop. Stop the machine and use a chip rake or similar to remove swarf. 0952009-23.jpg
 

T Bredehoft

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#13
Having seen a farm hand jump from a stake bed truck and leave his wedding ring behind, (including finger) I stopped wearing mine. Don't know where it is now. Still have the wife, though. And all 10 fingers. Two got broken when a 165# part fell from a faceplate on a lathe and a thumb got a screw driver slot in the end from a band saw, but that's all after 55 years of active work.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#14
I work at the Lansing Grand River Assembly plant in Lansing, MI. Our leadership required team members on the floor to wear gloves when working on the car to prevent mutilations from rings, etc. on the painted car. Then we had a team member use a gloved hand to hold a socket/bolt on center when driving the bolt. A gloved finger got snagged in the Atlas-Copco motor and he lost his finger. One the plus side, plant leadership changed the gloved team member rule figuring it's easier to fix a scratch on a car than it is to replace a missing finger.
 

great white

Active User
Active Member
#15
Hands, finger and loose clothing don't belong anywhere near rotating bits or anything that cuts while its in motion. Gloves or no gloves.

I also make sure I am not in line or in front of the cutting surface.

These two simple rules have gotten me through my 50 years of life with all my digits and no injuries to speak of over a career of working on, around and in machinery.

And yup, I wear gloves pretty much everywhere. Mechanix gloves all around the shop and a rubber/latex coated fabric glove (pretty much like a layer of skin) around the lathe.

It's not about the gloves, its about keeping your mind on the task at hand. Reaching in to a work area with your hand to grab a chip or curl is bad practice no matter how you slice it. Slice it is the key word here.

I'm almost always wearing ear defenders around anything that makes more than conversation type noise (a lifetime around jet engines and bad tinitus as a result will do that to you) and eye glasses go on (and come off) at the shop door. Rings, watches, etc are things I don't wear, just something I picked up when I started in aerospace soo long ago. Not even my wedding band.

Lots will disagree wih the way i look at it. So be it.

SA is king as far as I'm concerned. If you stay aware, you stay alive. That's the way it is at my work and my shop at least.

:)
 
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silence dogood

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#16
I worked with machinery and electronics(much if it was hi-voltage tube) so I don't wear any jewelry of any kind. One time a woman at a restaurant noticed that I did not wear a wedding ring. I explained to her that my wife knows that I love her so that was not an issue. Also she loves me enough that she does not want me to lose any body parts or worse.
 

timvercoe

Active Member
Active Member
#17
I have used some gloves occasionally. What I found is that it gives me a false sense of security and I become reckless then do stupid things. So far no finger loss, "knock on wood." I remember hearing or reading "no gloves in the metal machine shop" because of safety and because you loose that tactile sense of cleanliness, when mounting tooling and work on the machine. I.E. are there any chips/swarf that are going to foul my set up?
Tim
 

atunguyd

Active User
Active Member
#20
It's not just the metal work shop... We had a lawyer who got his tie caught in the office paper shredder. It pulled his head almost to the machine before someone managed to help him.

I guess some people are just accident prone.

Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk
 

kvt

Active User
Active Member
#22
I normally wear the nitrile gloves, when working on things, and any where oil, alcohol, acetone or anything else that is going to be used, Have very bad skin condition, where my fingers split open, and I have to do something if I want to play around with things. One of my doctors thinks it form spending to much time with my hands in contact with chemicals etc. So now I do wear gloves all the time.
I do not wear any rings, watches, etc and always have on the glasses. my wife only lets me wear the rings etc when we go out, as about 30 years ago, I was working on a car, and somehow my wedding ring wound up welded to the metal on the car, and I had one nasty burn on my finger, After that it was like she would rather me have all my fingers than wear a ring when we both know we love each other. Watch had a big blob of weld get in the glove and behind the watch band one time, Left a nice scar and now I rarely were a watch, and never when working on things. Lost my class ring in the fender of a kids car working on it when I was in School. I guess you might say I'm one of those accident prone people, but have all my fingers and toes just a few scars on them.
 

juiceclone

Active Member
Active Member
#23
Shop I worked at once had (fake) leather gloves with the fingers removed we were supposed to wear. Theory being you're less likely to get caught up in a moving mill or part that way. It was voluntary, and I don't remember anyone in my department wearing them.
 

planeflyer21

Active Member
Active Member
#24
My buddy said in another shop once, a guy was running the bandsaw with latex gloves on and got a snag on the running blade. Requested my friend's help at the first aid station.

One tiny hole in the glove, yet when they removed the glove the guy's finger was only hanging on by a couple of millimeters of skin.
 

yendor

Active User
Active Member
#25
I was taught by a master mechanic back when I was working my way thru college that the reason the top center drawer on the tool box had a lock was to put all your stuff in it when you came to work.
And to keep a scrub brush in the bottom for clean up when your done.

Still do - still have all 10 fingers & toes
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
#26
i almost never wear gloves in the shop unless it's for welding. i'm a feel type worker.
when i use latex or nitrile,
it's only when the job is exceedingly messy- but never while operating machinery with rotating blades or chucks
 

mattthemuppet

Active User
Active Member
#27
It was 18F in the garage the other night - if I didn't wear gloves (with the tips cut off) I wouldn't last long before I lost feeling in my hands. That would be way more dangerous in handling tools than wearing gloves. Now my feet, they can go completely numb as long as I don't fall over :)
 

mattthemuppet

Active User
Active Member
#29
necessity is the mother of invention :) I keep a hair dryer handy for when I need to warm up my dial indicator and a heat gun/ blow torch for when I need to get things unscrewed - like that chuck back plate I made!