• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
[4]

Got My First Lathe... Logan 1875 - With Restoration.

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

larry4406

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
50
Likes
20
I assume you are able to buy a new rear take-up nut? Or have someone make you one? You are really diving in deep on this and I enjoy watching.
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
I assume you are able to buy a new rear take-up nut? Or have someone make you one? You are really diving in deep on this and I enjoy watching.
Hello Larry.. If I cant find or buy one, I'll make one by turning a regular nut down and facing it. Someone over tightened that nut long ago, and I didn't want to risk any damage to the spindle so cutting it off seemed the logical choice. I would never be so brazen to cut off any part that was not replaceable, I would stop and ask for help on the forum or take it to a machinist.

Thanks for looking.. Mike
 
Last edited:

Nogoingback

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
478
Likes
258
Mike, if you replace the nut with another Logan part, you'll need a tool to tighten it. If that's the same size nut as on my Model 200 (1.5" dia.),
you can use a Metric (DIN 1810). 40-42 mm pin spanner. Fits perfectly. I bought mine online from J.W. Winco Inc.

Looks like this:


DSCF7113_zpsxortgckp.jpg
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
Mike, if you replace the nut with another Logan part, you'll need a tool to tighten it. If that's the same size nut as on my Model 200 (1.5" dia.),
you can use a Metric (DIN 1810). 40-42 mm pin spanner. Fits perfectly. I bought mine online from J.W. Winco Inc.
Hi Nogoingback.. Thanks for the suggestion my good man.

I have a very similar tool that I tried first but couldn't budge it....
I'm guessing someone used the take-up nut to tighten the chuck to the lathe which also
caused the bearings to bind, then after sitting for 20+ yrs the thin lubricant film turned to glue.

Even a foot long channel lock would't budge it held in a vise using 9/16 All-Thread through
the spindle held with washers and nuts fully tightened..

I tried the most common methods to loosen the nut.. they all failed, And I didn't want to chance damaging the spindle by using too much force or use of a blunt instruments.. After I removed the spindle, I figured out that I could have used my press from the spindle front to back the take-up nut and spacer off the rear bearing.

Live and learn. I've always said, Experience is what you get just after you need it.
On the plus side, Electrolysis of the headstock has been completed :)
Tool.jpg

This is strait out of the electrolysis bath, I used Mikeys method for stopping flash rust a 50/50
mix of Phosphoric acid, Remove most the water then spray it on and let it sit, rinse and dry.

The headstock was in the tank for 16 hrs @ 2 amps. there are a few patches of paint left
in the interior that will just act as additional protection after being painted.
HeadStockElectrolysisDone.jpg

Cleaned up with a very fine Scotch Bright pad.
HeadStockElectrolysisDonePolished.jpg
 
Last edited:

Nogoingback

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
478
Likes
258
Well after all that, I can see why you cut the nut off. Certainly easier than replacing than the spindle. One thing I don't understand is why it
caused the bearings to bind since Logans use ball bearings that aren't adjustable. The tension on that nut shouldn't have anything to
do with bearing preload. On mine the rear (small) bearing "floats" in the headstock with no lateral pressure on the outer race. When you
re-assemble you might want to look for some other cause for binding. What shape are your bearings in?

Looks as though you're doing your usual excellent job on the headstock casting.
 
Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
I assume you are able to buy a new rear take-up nut? Or have someone make you one? You are really diving in deep on this and I enjoy watching.
Hi Larry, Yes I can replace the take-up nut with an new original, Not all but many original parts are still available from Logan Actuator.
If you happen to have a Logan 1875 and need precise photos of the disassembly of any component, I have hundreds of them that don't make it to the forum and if you need to see a particular item I bet I have it... Thanks for looking, Mike.
 
Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
Mike, if you replace the nut with another Logan part, you'll need a tool to tighten it. If that's the same size nut as on my Model 200 (1.5" dia.),
you can use a Metric (DIN 1810). 40-42 mm pin spanner. Fits perfectly. I bought mine online from J.W. Winco Inc.

Looks like this:


View attachment 247602
Hi Nogoingback, It looks like you just added a new belt to your lathe, I love how nice your gears look - amazing how much work it is just to change a belt.
 

Nogoingback

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
478
Likes
258
The new belt was part of a bigger project to "overhaul" my lathe after I bought it. Everything came apart, repairs were made, parts replaced
(including headstock bearings) etc., etc. Of course, what I didn't do was paint it. It's a WW II era lathe with what I assume is US Army spec.
color that was applied over the Logan gray. It wasn't rusty and the paint, though showing honest wear isn't bad. And I'm lazy. And yes,
the gears were great: all perfect and only missing one change gear.

You're right, changing belts is a pain. The belt I bought came from Logan, though if I were to do it again I'd consider a cam belt from
the auto parts store: I've had some problems with slipping with the belt that I have.
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
So I started work on all kinds of stuff over the weekend and also finished painting the interior of the cabinets...

Talk about no fun at all, I don't suppose it would make much difference at this point if I called Logan and complained about not being able to remove the center cabinet shelf.. Ya know for the people that restore it 30 years later..)

There is only around 8" inches between the upper and middle shelf making it really hard to get a can in there.. I also see that it was hard for them as well via the paint runs I found in that area while prepping it.
CabinetRightPainted.jpg
CabinetLeftPainted.jpg
 

Attachments

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
The Photos below are for Headstock Parts placement reference as the head was disassembled....
Just in case anyone needs to see where a part may be orientated. 20 photos.
RefPhotoHeadStock001.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock002.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock003.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock004.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock005.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock006.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock007.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock008.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock009.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock010.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock011.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock012.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock013.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock014.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock015.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock016.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock017.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock018.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock019.jpg RefPhotoHeadStock020.jpg

As I reassemble Lathe components back to an assemble Ill try and get photos which will be
a clearer component placement view.
 
Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
While restoring this lathe, Questions concerning Oilite bearings and electrolysis came into question..
I did some research on Oilite bearings, there is lots of info on the subject along with some bad & misinformed info on the net.

The most important Question about oilite bearings is, can they be re-impregnated with oil.. Answer is Yes.
Another important Question about an oilite bearing is, can they be machined.. Answer is Yes.
should you grind sand or polish an Oilite bearing, Answer is No. These actions will close/clog the pores.

This site has some techincal info on the subject. Machining Oilite Bearings.
And this one you'll have to read threw for the recommended procedures of oil re-impregnation, not a direct link but can be found on this Bowman Oilite Page.

There are two recommended ways to rejuvenate an Oilite bearing, Note: some application require a specific Oil Type such as in contact with food.

1. Fully submerged and heat an Oilite bearing in oil to 80 deg Celsius or about 175 deg Fahrenheit, let the oil submerged bearing cool off completely. remove, wipe excess oil from bearing and its ready for use.

2. Use of a vacuum pump. Fully submerged an Oilite bearing in a light weight oil in a container, apply a vacuum to the container to pull air & moisture from the voids in the bearing for a few minutes, release the vacuum and oil will be pulled back into the voids.

While there are other recipes found on the web.. Those links are from competent sources so ill just head down that route. Till next time.. Mike.

Ps.. SAE 20wt Oil for re-lubing - I could not find an answer if this was a none detergent oil, I would think a none detergent oil because oils with detergents are used in high temp applications like engines.
 
Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
My first re-assembly photo procedure, the reversing lever assembly for the Logan 1875 lathe.
On my parts diagram it shows two rubber Orings, that fit in groves along the shaft that seats
on the spindle head, My lever does not have groves or orings.

This photo shows all the components that make up the reversing lever.
I will be using just a small dab of blue locktight on the threads during final assembly.
If it rides on a shaft it will be pre-oiled and all gear teeth will have a coat of graphite grease.
ReversLeverPartsAll.jpg ReversLeverPartsAssm1.jpg ReversLeverPartsAssm2.jpg

Take note of the Oilite Bearings in the two gears, see my previous post about how you can
rejuvenate them using a vacuum, if they are worn out you should replace them. once they
are assembled there is no way to oil them - the gears shown installed ride on a shaft that
has a felt wick to dispense oil along the shaft.
ReversLeverPartsAssm3.jpg ReversLeverPartsAssm4.jpg
ReversLeverPartsAssm5.jpg

Arrow is pointing to the oil hole which leads to the felt wick.
ReversLeverPartsAssm6.jpg
ReversLeverPartsAssm7.jpg
ReversLeverPartsAssm8.jpg

If you need a different view added here let me know, ill add it, there will be other assembly
views when its painted and reattached to the spindle head.. Mike.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
I started using Evapo-rust on some small parts.. with excellent results so far. Nuts, Bolts & Washers but tonight I'm taking the worst rust covered bolt, nut & washers and doing a comparison test. The Nut, bolt and washers at the top of the photo will get an electrolysis bath and the remaing Nuts, Bolts & Washers will go in the Evapo-Rust.

Tomorrow morning I'll pull them all out check the results, And edit this post to show it. None of these samples are terribly rusted - Just heavy surface rust mostly and the worst one I found at the bottom of the Motor Cabinet looks worse then it is.

I have absolutely abused the use of Electrolysis during this project because it was new and fun.. I did allot research and testing to see what happens when I change properties of the test, and I've learned a bunch.

For me I think there really is a middle ground for the the use of both Evapo-Rust and Electrolysis.
Can't wait till morning to see the results because these are mostly Identical parts used for this comparison test which is rare.
See you all tomorrow.. Mike.

EvapVsElectTest.jpg

The end results.. Both methods of rust removal leave behind a film layer. If Appearance is a
none issue then the Nuts & Bolts from the Evapo-Rust bath are ready for use.

The test subjects were dipped in acetone immediately after being removed from the rust
removal process.

EvaporustTest2.jpg

Using a Scotch Bright Pad, Both took about the same amount of time and effort to get to a
nice shine. The electrolysis bolt came out somewhat shinier- but may have been shinier to
begin with.. Very fine Scotch Bright pads are all that I use to shine stuff up, On the threads I
cheat and use a Dremel Tool with a wire wheel to clean out any left over crud.

EvaporustTest.jpg

Of course no real conclusions can be made from just one or even ten tests. I spent about 5
minutes each shinning these Bolts up, both were a success and look great to me.

Evapo-Rust is a bit costly so Ill reserve its use for small parts that fit in a small coffee can.
Small parts are also a hassle to use electrolysis on so the two methods are complimentary.

EvaporustTest3.jpg
 
Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
I Worked on the Spindle Pulley & Bull Gear over the weekend..

The spindle pulley just removed from the head assembly..
SpindlePulleyDirty.jpg

This Spindle Pulley Is actually two Parts, This screw keeps the gear mated to the Spindle Pulley.
Just a short turn and you'll see the oil access hole for the, lol oiless bearings.. The advantage
to tearing this whole lathe down is learning where and what lay hidden.
SpindlePulleyDirty1.jpg
SpindlePulleyDirty2.jpg

Spindle Pulley after Electrolysis.. Note the Alignment and Oil holes.
SpindlePulleyElectrolysis.jpg

All cleaned Up.. I really need to find a way to protect items like this from Re-Rusting, It took
about an hour to fully clean the gray film left from the electrolytic bath. This an all other parts
that have Oilless bearing will get a 2hr oil bath in SAE 20 none detergent oil at 180 deg.
SpindlePulleyDone.jpg
SpindlePulleyDone1.jpg

The Bull Gear just removed from the assembly..
I was relived after I removed the Bull Gear and cleaned it, I found no cracked or damaged teeth.
BullGearDirty.jpg

The Bull Gear after electrolysis.. No pre-cleaning is needed, Everything comes out of electrolysis oil, grime & rust free.
It took about 20 minutes to shine it up from this point..
BullGearElectrolysis.jpg

The finished Bull Gear..
BullGearClean.jpg

The Bull Gear locking pin Re-assembled..
BullGearParts.jpg
BullGearAssm.jpg

I had to stop by PPG to get more Scotch-Brite pads for a $1.99 Ea.. A good deal.. this and Extra fine is all I use to clean up everything.
The big orange box sells 2 half pads which is the same as this pad, for about double the price.
UltraFineScotchBright.jpg

More to come soon..!
The paint on the Lathe bed, Supports and cabinets have had time to thoroughly dry and are ready for assembly next.
 
Last edited:

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
3,152
Likes
3,075
Great job, Mike! Some lucky guy with a Logan to restore is going to thank you for your detailed pics and discussion.

Are you planning on using this lathe to make chips? I mean, that might get it dirty and that's a real concern. :nail biter:
 

RandyM

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
1,897
Likes
1,512
Mr Mike, you are having way too much fun. I am very envious. You are doing a great job. :encourage: Keep up the good work.

Mikey, your jealousy is showing. :grin:
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,194
Likes
4,389
Mr Mike, old lathes are supposed to look... OLD! Well, I guess you do not subscribe to that concept.
Very nice restoration, can't wait to see it finished.
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
Great job, Mike! Some lucky guy with a Logan to restore is going to thank you for your detailed pics and discussion.

Are you planning on using this lathe to make chips? I mean, that might get it dirty and that's a real concern. :nail biter:
Mr Mike, you are having way too much fun. I am very envious. You are doing a great job. :encourage: Keep up the good work.

Mikey, your jealousy is showing. :grin:
Mr Mike, old lathes are supposed to look... OLD! Well, I guess you do not subscribe to that concept.
Very nice restoration, can't wait to see it finished.
Hi mikey, RandyM & Bob Korves. Thanks for the compliments... And thank you guys for helping me with this project.!

Mikey.. I will absolutely be making chips on this lathe, All I ask for is a lathe in great working condition, in order for me to know that - I need to rebuild it myself. This has also been a fun learning project too, I can now visually identify and name every part and purpose except the quick change gear box and carriage, I haven't started restoring those components yet. Very soon ill be making chips, 6 months tops..

Randy M, Don't tell anyone but I have a slight case of OCD, So I tend to over do things till their the best I can get them... Its a fault - But I need it right to start with so I only have myself to blame for errors, going through this has been allot of fun.. great project.. thanks for helping.

Bob Korves, you have been a good voice of reason, and I do see your point about an old lathe should be what it is... I could have saved up and bought a new lathe, but I my mind couldn't justify the purchase, But I can trick my self into buying one thats used and spend additional funds making it look fresh, because I will learn much along the way, Kinda like a paid education.. worth every dime.

Soon I'll be begging you guys for help on how to use it - Hope you guys don't mind...:)

Thanks Mike.
 
Last edited:

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
3,152
Likes
3,075
Every one of us understands the drive you have, Mike. It might surprise you to know how many of us have completely taken our machines apart and refreshed them. We're mostly teasing you while also praising the job you've done - you're doing an excellent job of documenting your journey and this will help those who follow behind you. OCD? Check. Want your machine in top condition? Check. Possibly spending more to refurbish an old lathe than a new one cost? Check. You fit in here juuust about right, Mike! If you ask a question on using that lathe, I'm going to chip in some advice because I want to help you dirty it up!!
 

RandyM

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
1,897
Likes
1,512
Hi mikey, RandyM & Bob Korves. Thanks for the compliments... And thank you guys for helping me with this project.!

Mikey.. I will absolutely be making chips on this lathe, All I ask for is a lathe in great working condition, in order for me to know that - I need to rebuild it myself. This has also been a fun learning project too, I can now visually identify and name every part and purpose except the quick change gear box and carriage, I haven't started restoring those components yet. Very soon ill be making chips, 6 months tops..

Randy M, Don't tell anyone but I have a slight case of OCD, So I tend to over do things till their the best I can get them... Its a fault - But I need it right to start with so I only have myself to blame for errors, going through this has been allot of fun.. great project.. thanks for helping.
Mike, we are birds of a feather. Buried in that line of thinking is all the fun you are having. There some that will never understand the joy of do a total reconstruction and doing it correctly. Money and time always gets in their way. Oh, I don't think you are over doing anything, you are doing it correctly and proper. You are going to have a really nice machine that you can be very proud of and will last you until you are finished with it. Keep up the good work.

Bob Korves, you have been a good voice of reason, and I do see your point about an old lathe should be what it is... I could have saved up and bought a new lathe, but I my mind couldn't justify the purchase, But I can trick my self into buying one thats used and spend additional funds making it look fresh, because I will learn much along the way, Kinda like a paid education.. worth every dime.

Soon I'll be begging you guys for help on how to use it - Hope you guys don't mind...:)

Thanks Mike.
We are waiting in anticipation and highly looking forward to helping you with your projects. :encourage:
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,194
Likes
4,389
The really best thing is that your take down, cleanup, inspection, and polish of every part of the lathe gives you really intimate knowledge of what it is, how it works, and exactly how it was assembled and adjusted. When you are using it you will know and feel everything going on with the machine, good or bad, or just how it is. It is part of you and you are part of it. That is a very different experience from buying a machine, plugging it in, looking at the green start button, and saying "magic happens here."
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
I checked the Serial Number 71619 stamped on this Lathe against a date range at the Logan Lathe store to find the date of manufacture, If I'm reading it right then this lathe was built in 1957 - Which means it's 60 years Old..? Logan used Blue Gray paint till the 60's which is the color this lathe was before I electrocuted it. Hmm...

Edit: I ordered some parts today from Logan Actuator Co, While talking to Scott ( Parts and tech support ) I asked if he could verify the age of this lathe. Yup.. it was manufactured in 1957.

OriginalLatheColor.jpg
 
Last edited:

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
Time to assemble the back gears.. The following photos are for part identification and orientation.
Additional text only if an explanation is necessary. Parts are in their proper orientation, look closely.

BGPreAssm.jpg

During some previous assembly of the small gear that was pressed on, it galled and scraped
the metal which was pinched between the gear and shoulder - always use an anti-Seize.

The small gear is pressed to the shoulder and will leave about 3/16" of the quill end exposed,
Notice the portion near the end of the quill that steps down, press small gear on this side.

So your wondering or maybe not... The tube says aluminum - which is the main component,
color and heat range for this anti seize, it can be used on many alloy types.

Another popular anti seize is called Never Seez -
BGAntiSi.jpg

When parts need to be pressed past the end of a shaft I'll use a socket just larger then the
shaft - without a press you can use an all thread bar with nuts and washers to pull it on.
If you have never used a press watch lots of videos, Don't be in a rush, Don't use a hammer.
BGPressSmlGear.jpg
BGPressBigGear.jpg

If the play between the Oillite bearing & shaft is greater than .004 press in new ones.
BGShowSmlEnd.jpg
BGShowBigEnd.jpg
BGShowBigAndSmlEnd.jpg

The before and after -
BGCompair.jpg
Easy Peasy.. Done.

The bonus photos below :) show how the alignment should be to the Bull Gear and Spindle
Pulley when installed in the Headstock.

The Large Back Gear should be flush to the outside of the spindle pulley gear.
BGandPulleyGearMesh.jpg

The small Back Gear should be flush with the back side of the Bull Gear, Note the Bull Gear
teeth protrude past the small Back Gear by about an 1/8".
BGandSpindleGearMesh.jpg
BGandSpindle.jpg

The spindle assembly will be a different set of photos, although simple there are a couple things to be careful of, Spacing.
Thats all for now, have fun Mike.

Disclaimer - This is how my lathe is assembled, yours could be different so you should defer to your parts break down located in your manual.
 
Last edited:

RandyM

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
1,897
Likes
1,512
Mike, I find it interesting that the shaft has set screw marks on it.

You are obviously experienced at doing this sort of thing. I greatly appreciate that you are not taking any short cuts. You do quality work. :encourage:
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
Mike, I find it interesting that the shaft has set screw marks on it.

You are obviously experienced at doing this sort of thing. I greatly appreciate that you are not taking any short cuts. You do quality work. :encourage:
Hello RandyM, Yes..! those Marks are a conundrum on that piece. This is my very first lathe restoration project - fortunately the same skill set, methods and procedures apply to most machinery across the planet, I could have been an engineer in school but I chased after the girls instead, then later in life I learned machines just make more sense..! Who would have guessed :)
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
This Is the Eccentric Shaft that raises and lowers the back gears on many Logan laths.

This short series of photos show all the parts in their proper orientation.
Note that the short & long Bushings have oillite bearings, The shaft rotates but never spins
so the play between the shaft and bearings should be minimal, Pre-Oil the assembly
when Re-installing - there is no access to the right bearing after installation but the left
bearing can be oiled by removing the reversing lever if needed.
EccentricShaftParts.jpg

Notice the key is offset slightly on the shaft.. The pinion gear is slip fit, If needed use a socket
and not the bushing to convince the gear to fit flush to the shoulder.
EccentricShaftAssmEndZoom.jpg

The back gear assembly rides on this eccentric shaft which raises and lowers the back gears
to the spindle pulley & bull gear.
EccentricShaftAssm.jpg

The left and right bushings are held in the headstock with an allen head set screw at each end,
These bushings control the alignment of the back gears to the spindle pulley and bull gear &
Rack shifter and should allow very little lateral movement ( side to side ) of the back gears.
Refer to Post #173 in this thread to see the alignment of the back gear and spindle pulley.
In this photo you can see the eccentric shaft, back gears and bushings as an assembly.
SpindleBGProject.jpg
In the photo above with the back gears engaged there is a 6 to 1 gear ratio between the
spindle pulley and the bull gear.

More information and photos will be posted when these components are re-installed in the
headstock. Mike.

Disclaimer - This is how my lathe is assembled, yours could be different so you should defer to your parts break down located in your manual.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

RandyM

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
1,897
Likes
1,512
OK, now you are just showing off. :grin:

But that plastic stand for the gear train is a beauty. Sometimes it is nice to see an assembly without the surrounding hindrances. It can really let you see what is going on without mirrors and body contortions. :encourage:
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
OK, now you are just showing off. :grin:

But that plastic stand for the gear train is a beauty. Sometimes it is nice to see an assembly without the surrounding hindrances. It can really let you see what is going on without mirrors and body contortions. :encourage:
Hi RandyM. Thats why I'm building it, to show people how back gears work as a system, but the stands not done yet..
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
I love the easy ones - just surface rust mostly and scattered areas of missing & loose paint.
HeadstockCoverTop.jpg

This headstock cover was put in electrolysis, cooked over night and pulled out 16hrs later,
sprayed off with the hose then sprayed with 50/50 phosphoric acid, lightly scrubbed then I
let that stand for 2 minutes.. rinsed and dried.
HeadstockCoverTopElecBath.jpg

20 minutes of scrubbing with a Scotch Brite pad and wallah - Done.
HeadstockCoverTopClean.jpg
 

Mr Mike

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
130
The change gear cover has minor surface rust and tones of scaling paint.
It sat in the electrolysis tank over night and cleaned up with ease, I didn't remove the hinge pin
because of the angle it sits at... trying to drive the pin out without a press could damage the
casting so I left it in place and will work with it.

ChangeGearGuardRusted.jpg

After being pulled out of the tank it was hosed off and sprayed with phosphoric acid.. it sat
for about 4 minutes and scrubbed with a brush, then patted dry.
ChangeGearGuardClean.jpg

I used Scotch Brite to polish it up.. Done.!
ChangeGearGuardPolished.jpg

Guard was literally just pulled out of the electrolysis, You can see some paint still on the
part but its no longer adhered to the guard and is removed with the garden hose. I don't
show these photos because who wants to eat after seeing this.
ChangeGearGuardOutOfElectrolysis.jpg

Same as above just hosed off.
ChangeGearGuardHosedOff.jpg
Up next is the change gear assembly, after that all thats left is the Quick Change Gears, Carriage & Apron - then paint and reassemble - Woot getting closer every day... Mike.
 
Last edited:
[6]
[5] [7]