• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
[4]

Is .003 To Much Taper Over 24 Inches?

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Scruffy

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Messages
451
Likes
247
#1
I've had this lathe proably 2 years now and never turned anything very long. Well yesterday I was turning a piece of 1.75 stock down to 1.40 and took a measurement.
It is running .003 in bigger at the chuck end of lathe . Question is should I try to get it better, or this close enough?
I don't do work for nasa, just hobby.

Thanks ron
 

4gsr

HM Chief Foreman
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
4,458
Likes
2,754
#2
I call that pretty good. You can play with adjusting the tailstock but depending if that is coming off your 16" American or you're Logan 820. Can make a difference. That's about the same amount I get off my 13" Sheldon that's 60 years old! It does have some wear in the bed, too. Ken
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
4,351
Likes
3,592
#3
.003" @24" doesn't sound too bad.
a slight amount of twist may be present or as Ken said you could have slight misalignment of the tailstock, or wear or the combination of all.
try to correct for half of the TS error and test again, you may surprise yourself
 

Scruffy

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Messages
451
Likes
247
#4
I should have said , it' the American that's doing it. It was made in 54 and has very little wear. I don't know what it had been used for.
I think I will set up a dial indicator and try adjusting the tail stock.
Thanks ron
 

4gsr

HM Chief Foreman
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
4,458
Likes
2,754
#5
I bet your tailstock has worn enough that it is low on the centerline. May have to put some shims between the joint in the tailstock to raise back up on center.
 

Wreck™Wreck

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
1,943
Likes
1,512
#6
Only you may answer this question.

There is no standard, rule of thumb or conventional wisdom. What the Customer requires is what you produce. If the component works for the amount of time required then it is acceptable. if not then adjustments must be made, accuracy is application dependent. If this were not so every simple mechanical device would be significantly more expensive to produce, do you measure the diameter of the lead screw in a Chapstick™ dispenser or the thread lead of a lipstick package screw?

Make the parts so that they work together, this is the only important consideration, one could spend the remaining days of their lives chasing tenths, if however so inclined have at it.
 
Last edited:

12bolts

Global Moderator
Staff member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2011
Messages
1,929
Likes
368
#7
Something else to consider. If you find that the TS is low due to wear, it won't be consistent along the length of the bed. So shimming it at x position may make it high at y position

Cheers Phil
 

4gsr

HM Chief Foreman
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
4,458
Likes
2,754
#8
Something else to consider. If you find that the TS is low due to wear, it won't be consistent along the length of the bed. So shimming it at x position may make it high at y position

Cheers Phil
Possible and wouldn't rule it out. But the wear ratio between the bed ways and the bottom of the tailstock is like 1 to 20, for every 1 thousandth worn off the bed you will take off 20 plus on the bottom of the tailstock. This is if the bed is harden. And of course how well it has been oiled and ways wiped down over the years. Oh, you also have the issue of wear of the tailstock barrel or spindle wear and tear, too! Don't forget...
 

Big Bore Builder

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2012
Messages
67
Likes
79
#9
If the shaft does not have to be exactly straight, do not worry about it.

Tailstock is likely offset a thou or so. Aligning a tailstock is like a dog chasing its tail. Trial and error over and over again.
 

4gsr

HM Chief Foreman
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
4,458
Likes
2,754
#10
That's why God developed the Cylindrical Grinding Machines. Or was that Brown & Sharpe? He knew the lathe would not cut exactly straight as the customer wanted it. They were made to grind to exact OD's with near zero taper from end to end on a shaft with the correct setup. Ken
 
[6]
[5] [7]