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Is This Worth Restoring?

Izzy

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#1
So I recently acquired a 1972 Bridgeport series 2 for a hell of a deal and I've been learning as much as I can about machining, tooling and setups just as much as I can about machining in general. I'm currently working on getting the machine converted to 230vac operation as I would like to see it running before I go ahead and start with any sort of restoration. I figured you guys would know best so I got some close ups of all my ways and I'm wondering what you guys think, is it worth salvaging!?
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Billh50

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#2
If you were closer to me in CT I'd say no and have you just ship it to me for scrap. It has to be better than my drill press with a cross slide for milling. Depending on what you plan on using it for. I would get it hooked up and running first to see if it could hold close enough tolerances for the type of work I do. Then go from there.
 

Izzy

Active Member
Active Member
#3
I really would like to fix it up, this is really all I can afford and I don't mind putting some hard work into it if it means having a like new machine I've got the time that's not an issue. I do plan on getting it running first but I guess I'm wondering what would be involved in getting it back to atleast somewhat good condition the rust is alot worse than I thought but for only 300cad I can't complain...
 

Billh50

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#4
As I said. It may hold close enough tolerances for what you will be doing. That's why I would clean it up and hook it up to see how well it does first. The go from there as to what the problems are with it. If any.
 

Izzy

Active Member
Active Member
#5
What's the best way to go abouts removing the rust from the ways? And as far checking for tolerances I just put I dial indicator in a drill chuck and check the travel full stop to full stop?
 

Uglydog

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#6
She isn't a Jig Bore. But, then she never was.
As Billh50 wrote: tolerances.
What are you trying to do with her?
How tight/sloppy is the spindle?

Daryl
MN
 

Whyemier

Active User
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#7
Do as BillH says, you may find it does everything you want/need and then just a coat of paint would make it nice for you, IMHO.
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
#8
What's the best way to go abouts removing the rust from the ways? And as far checking for tolerances I just put I dial indicator in a drill chuck and check the travel full stop to full stop?
to remove the rust, sometimes steel wool can be your best friend
you can lightly stone the table and ways with a stone soaked in mineral spirits, diesel fuel or kerosene to remove high spots
be careful to wipe up remnants of the process and re-oil before use
you can mount an indicator on the column and sweep the table in both directions
you can mount an indicator on the table to sweep the knee travel
you can mount an indicator in the spindle and sweep for tram of the head
 

4gsr

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#9
Those ways are chrome plated. Do not use any acid or electrolysis to remove the rust. If you do, you may remove the rest of the plating. Get you a oil stone and some mineral spirits and hone the ways a little to remove any dings, ridges from the surfaces. To get the stone under the dovetails, take and grind a bevel on the back side of the oilstone on your grinder or use a side grinder. The bevel on the oilstone needs to be a shallower angle than the dovetail on the slide. Use the rest of the mineral spirits to clean the components with. Ken
 

Andre

Active User
Active Member
#10
Ken is correct. Those chrome ways are very nice, but be careful cleaning them. I can't imagine the chrome is very thick, even though they had to be plated thick enough to grind.

Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk
 

westsailpat

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#11
Well of course it's worth restoring , Is it a J head (step pulleys) , that's my favorite . Varidrive is a PITA in MHO . I have had both . From looking at the pics. the ways , I think are looking good . The brown stuff might be just dried oil . I say just clean it up and make chips . Just sayin' .
 

4gsr

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#12
Yeah, the chrome is only a couple thousandths thick. You can see where the chrome is starting to peel/wear off. I wouldn't loose any sleep over it. Use it like it is until something better comes along. Some day in the future, if you wanted to replate the slides, I know some people in Red Deer that do plating. It's not cheap, but can be done. Ken
 

Izzy

Active Member
Active Member
#13
She isn't a Jig Bore. But, then she never was.
As Billh50 wrote: tolerances.
What are you trying to do with her?
How tight/sloppy is the spindle?

Daryl
MN
its just going to be a general purpose machine for me it's my first machine so plan on making some small tooling for myself like 1-2-3 blocks, tap blocks and little things like that I also do alot of automotive type stuff, repairs custom made parts etc... Might be resurfacing the odd cylinder head here and there. How would I go abouts measuring for slop in the spindle? It feels pretty tight when I turn it if that's what you mean?

Well of course it's worth restoring , Is it a J head (step pulleys) , that's my favorite . Varidrive is a PITA in MHO . I have had both . From looking at the pics. the ways , I think are looking good . The brown stuff might be just dried oil . I say just clean it up and make chips . Just sayin' .
thanks ideally I would really like to just clean it up and make chips the last thing I wana do is go into a full rebuild even though I know it's going to need one soon but if I can get some use out of it before hand that'd be great! Its a 4j head they don't make these anymore unfortunately. one more reason I wana keep it, I like old vintage type stuff that doesn't exist anymore I think thats cool lol
So basically the general consensus is I should just clean it up and make chips and not worry too much about the ways? The spots that are missing the chrome seem like they are gouged so I was worried about that and the z axis takes quite a bit of stamina to bring from full stop to full stop is that just cuz of its weight or could that be another issue?
 

JimDawson

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Director
#14
the z axis takes quite a bit of stamina to bring from full stop to full stop is that just cuz of its weight or could that be another issue?
I assume we are talking about the knee. It's heavy!;) Get the ways cleaned up and everything oiled up and grease the screw and it should be easier.
 

Izzy

Active Member
Active Member
#19
Thank you! I think I was very lucky to get it I honestly never thought I'd be able to afford something like this but I know what these machines can do and I couldn't pass up such a cheap machine! I dated it to 1972 the series number is 872. I thought it was an 81 at first because of the date on the wiring diagrams but then I ran the serial number and found out it was even older lol
 

Whyemier

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#20
Nice! :you suck:

Figured I should throw that in there now that I'm jealous. I'll just have to keep limping along on my old RF30. Dang!
Ah well. Prob'ly couldn't have afforded it and trailered it home anyway. Dang!
 

Billh50

Active User
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#21
So your telling me you don't want to scrap it ?


Just kidding.....great score !! Wouldn't be giving up machining if I could find something I could afford. Good luck with it.
 

Uglydog

Active User
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#22
As wetsailpat has identified don't be displeased with those belts.
If the spindle turns smoothly/freely and you don't notice any lateral play when you grab the collet end of the spindle and pull it back and forth (motor off and unplugged) then clean her up and make chips if you find that you are unable to get the tolerances you want then you may have to do something more. Then you will have to identify the problem.

Run her at slow speeds initially, until she gets warm. Listen carefully does she purr, grind or whine?

Nice Score!!

Daryl
MN
 

Izzy

Active Member
Active Member
#23
I think it may have been part of my sneaky bidding scheme but I'm honestly surprised nobody bid more than 300cad for it! I later paid the person who stored it anothet 200cad for the tooling so it came out to a total of 500cad. (just shy of 380usd) I'm glad to hear that it should be fine as long as it runs! I just wana make chips! Planning on getting a stone to hone the ways today and was looking at this one http://m.homedepot.com/p/DMT-8-in-D...iamond-Precision-Flat-Sharpener-D8F/203381318 is that about what I'm looking for?
 

Billh50

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#24
It was a great deal. I lost out on 2 deals like that and can't afford one now unless it is with small payments. But I don't think that will happen.
 

JimDawson

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#25
Planning on getting a stone to hone the ways today
Before you start honing, just get things cleaned up. Those ways don't look that bad. My favorite is fine Scotch-Brite pads and kerosene or diesel. Then make sure the lube system is working, I would flush it out with type A ATF, if you you can't find type A, then Dexron would work. Then flush that out with whatever you want to use for way oil, I use 90W mineral gear oil.
 
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Izzy

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Active Member
#26
Any specific way of checking the lube system? There's a hand prime that you're suppose to pull but it's not moving bad sign?
 

Billh50

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#27
Jim is right....just clean her up first with a scotchbrite pad and some Kero or diesel. When cleaning if you notice some burrs sticking up you can stone those but I wouldn't go overly enthusiastic with the stone. Also get that lube system working and flushed out. You might have to take the pump apart to get it unstuck. Just be careful and watch out for springs and balls that may fall out when you take things apart. I usually take stuff apart either in a box or over a clean rag. That way stuff doesn't go rolling under that bench or fly across the room to some obscure place.
 

JimDawson

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#28
Any specific way of checking the lube system? There's a hand prime that you're suppose to pull but it's not moving bad sign?
It depends on the type of pump. If you have an electric pump, it could be just in the up position and you wouldn't be able to pull the plunger up any farther. Can you post a picture of the pump?

As far as checking out the lube system, get the pump working and then make sure you have oil coming out of all of the fittings. Everything that moves has an oil fitting(s) on it.
 

Izzy

Active Member
Active Member
#29
Its a Boehm brand pump I believe or something along those lines I don't have any pics of that but I know the plunger is at the bottom as it's almost flush with the rest of the pump and just has a little handle sticking out above it I'll get it cleaned up and post some more pics!
 

Dabbler

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#30
wonderful score! You need to lube the length of ways with way oil after cleaning even if your pump is working. I use a cardboard wiper and squirt gun until the ways have a light but detectable coating. then and only then do I use the one-shot lube and move it around... The pump may have seized due to non-use. I have seen this before on old and slightly abused machines. It might be quite simple to disassemble and get working again. If not, no big loss, new pumps can had (but for about half of what you have invested already!)