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Lathe Painting Questions.

kvt

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#1
Ok, I'm tearing down repairing, and repainting my used Federal tool Taiwanese 10 x24. I have found a bunch of loose paint, Rust, and rust under paint, Thus I am scraping where loose, and then sanding the rest to ruff it up to get it ready for paint. My question is what do people do to keep from messing up the ball oilers on their lathes when they paint them. Putting tape over them would be a real pain. And I would think there should be something that you could put on them to keep the paint from sticking.
The ways, etc I will use blue painters tape on. But those little oilers. How do others do it, and any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Ken
 

4gsr

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#4
Yeah, a dabe of grease or wipe the paint off immediately after painting. Used to work for a company back in my college days, when they got ready to do "Saturday Night Paint Job" on a machine, they smeared grease over all of the surfaces they didn't want paint on them including grease zerks, oilers, and such. When the paint dried, took rags and varsol and wiped off all of the grease. Paint job was done!
 

4gsr

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#6
Chewing gum, that's a new one.
 

British Steel

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#8
I take oilers, bolts, screws etc out. Then plug the threads/holes with foam earplugs, after painting run a craft knife blade around the hole and they pull out leaving clean, fresh threads :)

Dave H. (the other one)
 

kvt

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#9
I still have a ways to go, still cleaning things up, the problem with removing them is that I would have to replace them, and not sure if they are all the same size or where to get them or the cost of them. I guess I could knock one out and measure it. Does anyone know where a good place to purchase ball oilers from.
 

4gsr

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#10
......snip......Does anyone know where a good place to purchase ball oilers from.
I would rather replace all of those ball oilers with standard oil cups. Yeah I know, some of them have to be ball oilers. I have an assortment of sizes, I think they are 1/4" and 5/16" I bought some time of another. I know you can buy them from McMasterCarr also. look under "Lubrication-oilers" or this link https://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-oil-cups/=15o8hhu Don't know why they are listed there but they are.
 

tq60

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#12
Double stuck tape or weather stripping or any other thick and rubbery peel and stick stuff can be used.

For ball oiler try a paper hole punch to punch out a blank to stick on it

Remember it is a lathe and after a month or so it will be messed up anyway...

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

kvt

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#13
Yea, but for the month it will look good, and besides it is going to keep some rust down. Did not like it much when I figured out moisture was under the paint. And I do not have a coolant system So some of the humidity is getting in. I fight enough with the parts that do not get painted
Have found that it has been at least 4 different colors,
Top gray
under that Light Gray
some color green
Under that White
under that emerald green
I think part of the problem is no one took care of the problems before they put a new coat on which is why I am finding rust under some paint spots.
 

4gsr

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#14
At least you didn't uncover a layer of burnt orange paint. Usually indicates "lead" in the paint.
 

kvt

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#15
No the original primer is what looks like the old redish primer. Not sure if that is the one you are talking about, It is a 1977 vintage lathe according to the plate on it.
 

12bolts

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#16
Ken,
If the problem is as bad as that you might be better off stripping back to bare metal and starting again. Otherwise you risk your new paint lifting because the layers underneath arent adhering.

Cheers Phil
 

tq60

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#17
For fast cheap easy stripping go to sams club and get the grill cleaner.

It is a 3 pack of quart size bottles of oven cleaner with a spray head for about 9 bucks.

It will attack the paint and water rinse.

If you have any painted label take remove them first

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

4gsr

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#18
For fast cheap easy stripping go to sams club and get the grill cleaner.

It is a 3 pack of quart size bottles of oven cleaner with a spray head for about 9 bucks.

It will attack the paint and water rinse.

If you have any painted label take remove them first

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
Man, don't do that! That stuff has lots of caustic materials in it. Don't get me wrong, I tried that on my 20" L & S, it caused more rust on every thing around where it was used! You're much better off using a paint stripper that is not too tempermental with metal rusting, just removing paint. Ken
 

tq60

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#19
It is lye based oven cleaner for food preparation apparatus.

Lots safer than any oil based solvents.

Yes it could rust but it is easy to control via pant thinner in a spray bottle to wet it down after rinsing.

If you have bad surface preparation that requires yiu to get to bare metal then that is the magic stuff.

Any sheet metal that can be removed should be.

For carefull control use a pump up garden sprayer with a strong dawn mix and you can focus the rinsing to keep the mess under control.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

12bolts

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#20
I like electrolysis. Its slow, methodical, doesn't harm anything its not supposed too, painfree, cheap and simple.

Cheers Phil
 

kvt

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#23
Yea, the Electrolysis will remove the rust but will it get the paint off where it has rust sealed under it. I would have to have some way for it to get into that are first. The bad spot are being taken down with a top scrape and then wire brush and treat, then move to the next little area. This may take a while but do not have anything big enough to submerge the whole bed in at once to do the electrolysis either. Do not like oven cleaner as it has a tendency to etch the metal a bit more, And even if you cover the ways etc it seems that it will get under the edges of the tape and etch the metal.
I may be wrong. Also when I did my Band saw with rust removal, It was doing surface rust almost as fast as I was washing the stuff off.

By the way I'm looking at the harmerite paint to go on it. seems like a good choice and can stand oil etc.

Ken
 

12bolts

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#24
Ken the electrolysis will cause the entire surface to lift. Good paint, bad paint, rust. It will all come off. You will be left with bare metal. And perhaps some bondo. It will want to surface rust very quickly. So have some rust preventer handy.
You dont need a big plastic tub. You can make a 1 off use bath out of wood and line it with heavy plastic membrane.

Cheers Phil
 
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