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Msc Milling Machine

Discussion in 'QUESTIONS & ANSWERS (Get Help Fast Here!)' started by Billh51, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. Billh51

    Billh51 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I am looking for some information on an MSC mill model #x6323. There is one for sale within a reasonable distance from me and looking at the pictures of it, seems to be in nice shape. I know looks can be deceiving and a thorough check and inspection will tell the tale.
    What bothers me is you don't see a lot of these machines and I am wondering is it worth looking at? It is a Bridgeport style knee mill with a 9x42 table. Power feed on the X travel and a two axis accurite dro. Comes with a 6" vice but no tooling. There asking $3750 or BO.
     
  2. kd4gij

    kd4gij United States Active User Active Member

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    I have not used one of there mills. Have however used a couple of there lathes. If it is in good shape I would not hesitate. There equipment seams pretty good. And twain made.
     
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  3. Billh51

    Billh51 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the reply. I am heading out tomorrow morning with the trailer hooked up, just in case it's a good one in nice shape. It's about a three hour drive so I hope it's not a wasted trip.
     
  4. Martin W

    Martin W Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Good luck with your road trip. Hopefully its in nice shape.
    Martin W
     
  5. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I bought one of their Bridgeport clones,and had to return it. The front edge of the table was GROSSLY too high compared to the back edge. Should be a LITTLE higher to allow for cutting pressure,but this one was WAYYYYY too high. And,I wasn't about to take off the 600# 42" table and re scrape a brand new machine.

    This mill was for my shop at the museum where I was the toolmaker. I had a DECENT Taiwan made Bridgy clone at home,which I still have. No problem with the table being cockeyed with my Wilke Machine Co. mill,bought in 1986. They stopped selling machines many years ago,though.

    I think this one was made in China,but it has been a long time. I bought a higher priced Taiwan made model from them instead. They gave me a good deal since the other mill wasn't satisfactory. It was much better,and should have been as it cost a LOT more. Larger column and 49" table.
     
  6. Billh51

    Billh51 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the replies everyone, I made the trip and wound up coming home with it. It is a 2001 model and had been in a limited use R & D shop. It is in very nice shape and feel very lucky to have it. This is just the type of machine I have been looking for and I think it will work out well for me.
    I had been considering a bench type mill but when I saw this one I couldn't pass it up. I will post some pictures of it soon after I get it off the trailer and sitting on the floor.
    I will be looking for some help choosing a VFD as it is a three phase motor. The motor is a two speed 240 volt which gives you a rpm range of about 75 rpm to 4800 rpm. Not quite sure how the two speed motor works out with a VFD but I know you guys will help me through it. Looking forward to making some chips.
     
  7. cathead

    cathead Active User Active Member

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    Billh51,

    The two speed motor will work fine on a VFD. I used the lower speed set of wires but either set will work. My mill is an ENCO
    and has the two speed motor. ENCO and MSC are connected together somehow so your MSC mill may be the same as a similar
    ENCO mill. I went to the VFD because the switch on the mill finally wore out. My mill is a step pulley model as yours is
    as well from what I read in your posts. I'm using a TECO FM50 VFD and have been very happy with it so far.
    Congratulations on the new mill!
     
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  8. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Put a dial indicator into the spindle and run it forwards and backwards across the table. Being careful of the T slots,of course. The indicator is easily knocked out of whack by them. Or,better,lay a flat piece of precision grownd tool steel across the width of the table and run the indicator on that. MAKE SURE IT IS STRAIGHT!!

    The front edge can be a thou and a half higher than the rear. Mine was about 3X that. So,back it went. A PAIN to send a big machine back!

    It could be that my MSC mill was defective. I hope yours is o.k..
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2016
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  9. Billh51

    Billh51 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    George,
    I checked the Y travel with an indicator and a presission strait edge. Front edge is .001" higher on the front, so I think all is good to go. Thanks for the advise
    .
     
  10. Billh51

    Billh51 United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Cathead,
    Glad to hear I can run a VFD, I was thinking I may have to go to a RPC. I got it off the trailer today and positioned where it's going to sit in the shop. I did it by myself which didn't go to bad, just took my time and planned the moves carefully.

    I didn't get any manuals or schematics with the mill so I may need some help identifying which set of motor leads to use when I hook up the VFD. I did take a few pictures of the ordeal and will post some in a few days. Just glad to have it sitting on my shop floor.

    I was checking EBay for VFD's and was wondering what horsepower rating you used?
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2016
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  11. cathead

    cathead Active User Active Member

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    My mill has a 2HP motor and I used a 3HP TECO FM50 VFD. I have wired up a Chinese VFD unit but the instruction
    book leaves a bit to be desired so went with the TECO. They can be had quite cheaply though so maybe worth consideration.
    The hard part comes with the programming because the Chinese units are written in a dialect of english some call "Chinglish".

    I'm glad to hear you have the mill on firm footing. I remember when I unloaded my mill off the trailer by myself. I knew one rafter
    probably wouldn't support the mill so laid a log between 3 rafters and lifted against that. It worked out fine.

    Your motor will have 6 wires coming out of it I would think. Three are for low speed and three are for high speed. If in
    doubt, you can use an ohm meter or continuity tester to determine which wires belong to which speed. I taped off the
    high speed wires and ran the 3 low speed wires to the VFD. Your mill speed can be determined quite easily by using
    the frequency reading on the VFD. Sixty cycles would result in the speed your belt chart reads. Thirty cycles would
    be half the belt speed and 120 cycles would be twice the belt speed ETC so quite easy to know what speed your mill is
    turning.

    Hopefully this is useful information for you.

    Cathead
     
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  12. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    VERY glad to hear that your MSC mill is good! The trouble with Chinese stuff in general is QUALITY CONTROL!!! A friend ordered a JET lathe,and found the carriage was CLEAR FULL OF CHIPS!! I wonder if that sabotage was committed by a factory worker who was disgruntled. He decided to send the lathe back,and get a better model. The next was o.k..

    There are so many stories about castings full of sand,etc..

    I have had my step pulley(I won't risk a variable speed head on my OWN mill!) Those things have a million parts in them. Even Bridgies develop trouble from plastic bushings(I think). Since 1986 my mill has been great. I had its brother at the shop too. It is still going strong,and has had a LOT more use than my mill at home. Too bad mine is single phase,a VFD would do a lot to eliminate belt changes. But,I made that choice in 1986.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2016
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  13. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Just wondering why ied want the front of the table .001 higher than the back ?.
     
  14. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It is standard to let the table be a little higher in front to be slightly pressed down under the pressure of cutting tools,as I already mentioned above. about .0015" is standard for this model machine,which is a pretty flexible(bendy) machine.

    Check my first post in this thread.

    P.S.: The same applies to drill press tables. They will bend down under pressure of a decent size drill bit.
     
  15. roboelle

    roboelle United States Swarf Registered Member

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    Question for you guys familiar with MSC knee mills - I have one in my shop and it's acting up at low speeds. I want to see if I can repair and replace anything that's mucked-up but don't want to take it apart without a little more information about it (other people use the mill so I can't put it out of commission for too long).

    Is there a manual for this mill that anyone knows of? I'm striking out finding one online. Or any other advice would be appreciated - I've worked in shops for about 8 years, but haven't taken a mill apart to fix it up yet.
     
  16. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Variable Pitch Sheave drive, also commonly known as a Reeves Drive. Mechanical variable speed device with 2 sliding sheave parts that are prone to wear, I once owned a Clausing lathe with one for the spindle drive, replaced or repaired twice in twenty years and I ran this lathe 20-30 hours per week.
    In typical hobbyist use they should last the life of the machine owner however, when worn they vibrate a good deal and are very noisy, not a bad system in it's day.
     
  17. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The MSC mill I'm sure is a Bridgeport clone of a 2J mill. Look for a manual for a 2J Bridgeport mill or go to Grizzy's website and match up your mill with one of theirs a down load their manual. Could be a good place to buy parts from, too without going thru MSC. BTW- have you called MSC and see what they have to offer? As for a fix, I believe Wreck has pretty much pin pointed the possible problem.
     
  18. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Wreck Wreck,of course my Hardinge HLVH also has the variable pitch pulley drive on it. After cleaning the surfaces of the pulleys,and installing a new Hardinge belt,the HLVH runs so smooth I can balance a penny atop the headstock,and run the lathe through all the speeds,both in high and low speed range,without the penny falling over.

    A problem I have found in Asian variable pitch pulley drives is their belts are not completely even in width every where,causing an un wanted vibration that gets worse in the higher speeds.
     

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