• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

Not really restoring, just fixin' it up

larry2c

Iron
Registered Member
#1
I'm new to the forum and new to actually having a machine in my garage but a long time machinist. I bought a Husky 8X30 knee mill last week and I've been cleaning the years of cutting oil & gunk off of it for the last few days. At this point I'm not interested in making the machine look show room new but I want to get it cleaned up so I don't get slimed every time I use it. Besides the years of gunk on the machine, there are many places where the paint and I assume filler below the paint have chipped of (big patches actually).

So my question is this, what is the process for getting the paint back somewhere near normal? I know over the years in the shop we repainted a number of Bridgeports and lathes and the paint always wrinkled up either immediately or as soon as cutting oil or coolant got on it. Is there some paint that works better than others? I'm going to be limited to brush & roller or rattle can for this job so that may limit my options.

I did a couple of searches on the forum but didn't find anything on specific paints or methods. If I wasn't searching in the right sub-forums (this seemed like the place) please let me know.

Thanks!
 

rmack898

Active User
Active Member
#2
I've had very good results using the industrial alkyd enamels from both Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore.

I use a brush and trim roller and get a very nice finish.
 

larry2c

Iron
Registered Member
#3
Thanks for that info Mac! What sort of filler would you use to patch up what's come off the machine, just regular old Bondo?
 

drs23

Active User
Active Member
#4
Thanks for that info Mac! What sort of filler would you use to patch up what's come off the machine, just regular old Bondo?
Seems to be what the factory used and that's what it does. Unless someone can verify differently I would get it as clean as possible so it'll stick and then have at it.
 

rmack898

Active User
Active Member
#6
The last machine I did , I used a filler called "Icing". It's similar to body filler but it's lighter and sands easily but it is limited to filling 1/8" or less.
 

Keith Foor

Active Member
Active Member
#8
Hate to bring up an old post but this bears an answer. Alot of the pro machine rebuild houses use automotive body supplies and paints when rebuilding a machine. Yes, it's over kill but consider that automotive paint has to stand up to oil, gasoline, wind, weather in all seasons and environments. It would stand to reason that it would be a great finish for a machine tool. It's easy to obtain, easy to apply (reasonably easy anyway) and leaves a nice finish. As far as "Bondo" or other plastic fillers, they can be applied to a sand cast part and then sanded smooth as glass in preparation of the finish being applied and is going to be compatible with the paints made for automotive use. It's certainly time consuming, but the end product is better visually than any machine coming right off the line new.
 

astjp2

Active User
Active Member
#9
I use PPG aquapon 35, its chemical resistant but requires good prep and a good primer. I like either variprime or DP40 for primer. if you are going to disassemble to paint, why not look at what is worn and see about scraping in the worst items. Food for thought. Tim