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[How do I?] Painting A Machine. How To Spray Or Do I Brush?

Discussion in 'MACHINE RESTORATION & WAY SCRAPING' started by countryguy, Jun 26, 2016.

  1. countryguy

    countryguy United States Active User Active Member

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    First test project: http://www.hobby-machinist.com/thre...lathe-a-few-qs-and-1-issue.48244/#post-407375

    To paint this I may as well make darn sure the paint job comes out exceptional with this much work going into the unit.

    How should I paint this economically? I think brush will be a disappointment. Can I pick up one of the diy paint sprayers. Wagner stuff? Or do you guys call up a paint shop? It'll be stripped down and ready. Would that be a few hundred? Several hundreds?

    Thanks for the help here !!!
    Having a great time on this. Very relaxing. Feels good knowing how well this can come out when done right
     
  2. TOOLMASTER

    TOOLMASTER you don't want to know Active Member

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    I like to brush on hammer paint to get a nice texture..2 coat min

    IMG_0716.JPG
     
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  3. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Depends on the 'perfection' you will be happy with...

    I have painted a lot of dark blue Rustoleum (Royal Blue) with a brush... note this is oil based paint... and the results are quite acceptable.
    Note the finish is by no means like an auto... but acceptable.

    Rattle cans, to me, are not really high quality paint... they chip and ding and are sensitive to chemical issues.

    As always... preparation is the key to a nice paint job.
     
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  4. countryguy

    countryguy United States Active User Active Member

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    I think the lathe gods are happy with me today. I bought this spray system in the early 2000s and totally forgot about it. My post set off the light bulb. Yep still here in the barn in my cubby space. Thank goodness her garage sale antics did not find it.
    Manual says it can do oil based enamels. I think I will give this a go on some test items when ready to paint. Suggestions stl very welcome. Clueless when painting anything but walls.
    image.jpg
     
  5. countryguy

    countryguy United States Active User Active Member

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    That hammer paint looks really nice! Do you remember the paint mfr name.

     
  6. TOOLMASTER

    TOOLMASTER you don't want to know Active Member

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    that is diamond vogel paint that i bought about 10 years ago.. good stuff
     
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  7. TOOLMASTER

    TOOLMASTER you don't want to know Active Member

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    the blue is nice too ;-)
     
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  8. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    You can buy a "smoothing" agent at most well stocked paint stores. Can't remember a brand name or the proper terminology but the stuff allows the paint to flow out before drying. I've used with brushes and I got near spray gun quality finishes.

    Tom S.
     
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  9. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    You can get similar results with Rustoleum paints... might thin them just a tiny amount with mineral spirits.
    Plan on two coats, and use a quality brush.
     
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  10. Larry42

    Larry42 United States Swarf Registered Member

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    Hard to beat a spray finish BUT it takes some practice to do it correctly. Prep time will far excede painting time. Surfaces must be CLEAN! Any imperfections in the surface will show. Make sure every bit of it has been sanded. Paint will not bond to chaulky old paint. A coat of primer/surfacer wet sanded will fix minor scratches and when wet let you see imperfections. The finish will lay down better if you have the right reducer and amount. Reducers are available for use at different temperatures. I used to paint our truck fleet with Imron from DuPont. Great paint, Urethane based, very durable, expensive. But you get what you pay for. Don't buy cheap paint!
    Is the painting equipment in the photo an airless outfit? If so, good for painting big surfaces, lacks controls for doing fine finish work. You would be better served with a gravity gun from Habor Frt. They aren't high quality and won't last long but are adjustable.
    Tip- remove the masking tape as soon as you can. Don't let it stay on until paint is dry! Doesn't matter if it is just covering something and not meant to separate two colors on one surface. But don't leave it until paint is fully hard or it may be dificult to get it off cleanly. Several just wet coats are better than one thick coat. Catalized finishs all have a window, the time that you can't apply another coat. Read the instructions! Do a test on somethingbefore the main event.
     
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  11. oldboy1950

    oldboy1950 Active Member Active Member

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    i like to add penetrol to enamel paint.
    it helps the paint flow out better and gives you more open time which almost eliminates streaks providing you have a good brush .
    i must confess that i usually use a throw away brush for most of my painting.
    Dan
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2016
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  12. MozamPete

    MozamPete South Africa Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Me too, especially with enamel - costs more in turpentine to clean the brush or roller than it does to just go buy a new one.

    My tip of the day - between coats I put the brush or roller in a ziplock bag and into the freezer (everyone needs a freezer in their workshop for shrinking shafts etc, and the occasional cooling of beverages). Stops the brush drying out and you don't have to bother cleaning it when you know you are going to be using that colour again in the next couple of days. Bit of fresh paint on it and it quickly thaws out and your away again.
     
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  13. cjtoombs

    cjtoombs United States Active User Active Member

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    I have had very good results spraying RustOleum oil based paint through a cheap HPLV gun I got from Home Depot years ago. I thin it 2:1 with acetone. For a more durable finnish I spray automotove acrylic enamel with the same gun. The automotive paint stands up to solvents better, which is kind of nice on a machine tool. Of course the RustOleum is about $9/qt and the automotive is around $35/qt and requres activator, which is also costly. If I'm spraying the cheap paint I use the RustOleum gray primer, for the expensive stuff I use Direct To Metal (DTM) epoxy primer. The cheap paint seems to hold up well as long as you keep solvents away from it. For stuff like cabinets and stands that are not likely to get oily, it works great. It does take some practice not to get runs in the paint, and if you don't have the surface clean of oil you will get fisheyes (that's with either paint).
     
  14. Sblack

    Sblack Canada Active Member Active Member

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    Please make sure to tape off all machined surfaces including anything that a fastener will bear on and please don't paint the fasteners. Nothing looks worse.
     
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  15. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Ditto about Rust-Oleum enamel. Gloss Royal Blue 7727. Try to thin as little as possible for the best rock-hard finish.
    Degrease parts (I use camping fuel) and use a good brush. Cheap and very satisfactory. DSCN0186.JPG
     
  16. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    One of the nice things about Rustoleum 'Royal Blue'...

    Is it is close to PM (Precision Matthews) blue.
    Now the white... that is not an easy match with a stock Rustoleum color.
     
  17. countryguy

    countryguy United States Active User Active Member

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  18. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

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    If you are going to spray it I would use the hardner. It does help, Also ensure that if you need to thing it you use the correct reducer for that paint. They are not all the same. The wrong one can actually congeal the paint. Don't ask how I know. Also do not mix the whole thing at one time. Only mix what you need. Depending on the temp will depend on how much working time you have with the mixed paint and hardener . Auto paint you can get hardener and reducers that have different dry times based on the temp you will be working in. And they help.
     
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  19. Splat

    Splat Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Brush. I hate rattle cans, though they have their uses, but you're paying a good chunk for the propellent. I was going to see about getting that Majic Tractor and Truck paint but nearest vendor was 1+hour away and shipping would'a been $$$ so I went with Rustoleum. I brush painted my Johannson mill and my Heavy 10 lathe with 2 coats of their "Stops Rust" oil based protective enamel and it's held up very well. Better than I thought it would, actually. Use Acetone for surface prep and at least 2 coats of paint and you're good to go.
     
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  20. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I like using a foam roller and then as already stated make sure to use hardener. You can get the rollers in varying sizes and gives you a nice uniform kinda orange peel look. I think it is perfect for a machine tool finish. I also use a good Valspar paint.
     
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  21. coherent

    coherent United States Active Member Active Member

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    I know it's all a matter of cost & how much time and effort vs quality you want to achieve, but I've used cheap rustolium enamel (pint or quart cans, not rattle spray cans) and a cheap Harbor Freight spray gun with excellent results. A few tips...

    -Dismantle, clean, tape, wipe down with acetone all your parts. Just like with any other paint job. The better the prep, the better the final finish and longevity.
    -Prime with rustolium primer 2 light coats should be fine. The primer will dry faster than the enamel. You can use the rattle cans to prime, or buy a pint (or larger) and thin and prime for best results.
    -Thin both paint (and primer) with 1 to 4 or 1 to 3 parts acetone. (I prefer 2 parts paint to 1 part acetone). It's thinned more than they say on the can, but it works great believe me. Without thinning it takes forever to dry. Days or a week or more depending on the temps. Paint it in the winter and weeks to dry thoroughly. You can use naptha for good results also, but I've been happiest with dry time, quality and hardness using acetone.
    -Buy a cheapo harbor Freight HVLP gun to spray it with. They are about $15 and less with a coupon. They also make disposable paint cups. Toss the disposable paint hopper when you're done and just run/spray a little plain acetone or naptha through the gun to clean. All in all pretty easy cleanup.
    - Spray 2-3 thin coats vs one heavy coat unless you're in a dusty area. let it dry a day or two before you reassemble. Use light coats. Let the previous coat tack well before spraying on the next. I waited and hour or more between coats. Put the last coat on a bit heavier. Remember its thin (like water) so spray carefully (good gun control) and don't over do it to avoid runs. It will dry to touch by overnight depending on you mix/thin and how heavy you coat, but let things harden well to avoid marring the new paint job during assembly. A day or two may be fine, but the longer you give it the tougher it will be. Once again it just depends on your thinning ratio and outside temps/humidity.

    The cheap harbor Freight HVLP spray guns are one of the better HF products for the money. (I think the current model is anodized purple). I've used some pretty good (and expensive) guns over the years and I was impressed the first time I tried one especially considering the cost. Definitely good enough for farm and machinery spray jobs. Do a little searching on the web for spraying rustolium. Lots of info and videos out there. There are folks who have painted cars with rustolium (really!) and with some pretty amazing results.
     
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  22. Andre

    Andre Active User Active Member

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    I believe camping fuel might be kerosene, which is a light oil/solvent. I don't think it's a degreaser, but it's one helluva good cleaner!
     
  23. Reeltor

    Reeltor United States Active User Active Member

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    It has been a long time since I've taken the time to paint a machine, I'm afraid that if I took it apart it may never go back together. On the other hand, I do like some of the excellent tear-down, clean, repair and paint jobs that many have posted.
    Pittsburgh Paints used to sell Industrial Enamel, it brushed on beautifully and provided a hard, solvent resistant surface.
    Use a good natural bristle brush like a Purdy. I like the sash style brush.
     
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  24. neshkoro

    neshkoro United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    In the olden days, I was told that repainting a machine reduced its value. People seem to want original. I worked for a company some years back. The boss wanted to paint all the production machines. He decided to let the operators choose the color they wanted. It looked like a carnival. Once they are painted, they stay that way!

    Bill
     
  25. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Camping fuel is naphtha, also called "white gas" in the before-time. It MIGHT have a very small amount of light oil in it, but I have evaporated the Coleman product on paper and not noticed any stain-It's about the same price as acetone so take your pick. Acetone can sometimes have a small amount of water in it, IIRC.
    MS
     
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  26. AJB

    AJB United States Active Member Active Member

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    Rustoleum colors can be mixed for a "custom" color, and the one time that I used it, I found that a brushed on finish leveled out very well.

    My mix was one-half of a pint of blue to a quart of smoke gray. This is a pic before I moved it into my shop:
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2016
  27. Reeltor

    Reeltor United States Active User Active Member

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    That's a good looking color for a machine. Paint looks very good.

    Mike
     
  28. AJB

    AJB United States Active Member Active Member

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    image.jpg Thanks Mike,

    I played with the mix to try to match the original color. It was close, but I probably added a little to much blue. Overall though, I was pleased with the outcome. The rustoleum really leveled out pretty darn well, which is a tribute to the paint, not the painter...



    Tony
     
  29. GLCarlson

    GLCarlson United States Active User Active Member

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    Tony, your Standard Modern turned out very well indeed. A superb job.
     
  30. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I tried a 4" foam roller on my Burke mill this spring, with rustoleum paint. . The finish turned out substantially better than if Imhad used a brush. Still need a brush for tight corners and various touch up spots.

    BTW, Rustoleum chips pretty easily. A bit disappointed with it...
     
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