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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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DoogieB

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For my next mill project I will need to use a slotting saw. The blades were bought on Ebay a few months ago, but I still needed an arbor so I made one today.

arbor_1.jpg

It's for blades with a 5/8" hole. I copied the design from downloaded plans.
 
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firestopper

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Firestopper, no a simple manifold will not be sufficient, you need check valves installed into both gas lines, before they Y into one, also need dual flow meters, if one bottle is higher pressure it could backfill the other bottle.... it was kind of a pain for me to get the mix right without having check valves installed. Ended up waisting more UHP helium because my argon bottle was higher pressure...
Sorry, I was assuming one would have the basic regulator/flow meters installed on cylinders prior to blending. I did fail to call out CV, my apologies.
 

BGHansen

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Not a "did it yesterday" project, just a quickie that saves me a lot of time with my 5-C collet chuck when changing collets. My Clausing 5418 has a CDCO 5-C collet chuck that takes a whopping 30 turns of the chuck key to loosen/tighten collets. The chuck key is something like 9 mm square. I didn't show the grinding operation, but started with a 1/4" hex to 3/8" adapter, mounted it in a 5-C collet in a square collet block and ground the flats to make it a 1/4" hex to 9 mm adapter.

I use a $15 HF 12V cordless drill to run the adapter. At that price it's dedicated to the lathe.

Bruce

20151228_133125.jpg 20151228_133149.jpg
 

BGHansen

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I use collets for a lot of my projects which involve turning brass. Advantages are easily under 0.001” run out (at least with my set up) and no marring of the brass when chucking up in collets. Pretty rapid stock changes too with the lever style adapter on my Grizzly G0709 lathe.

One thing I don’t like about my lever style closer is changing collets. I can get about a half-turn on the hub adjusting sleeve by hand, need 10-12 full turns to tighten/loosen the collet. Not a big deal other than it takes time and patience.

My solution was a drive hub for the back side of the draw bar tube and a driving adapter powered by a cordless drill. Materials at hand were a 2” round of 303 stainless for the tube hub, a 1 3/8” aluminum round for the drive adapter and a piece of ½” CRS for the drive arbor.

Pictures detail the project. Pretty happy with the end result, the cordless drill makes short work of spinning the draw bar tube when changing collets.

Bruce

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zmotorsports

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For my next mill project I will need to use a slotting saw. The blades were bought on Ebay a few months ago, but I still needed an arbor so I made one today.

View attachment 117587

It's for blades with a 5/8" hole. I copied the design from downloaded plans.
Another project of mine that is on the "to do" list. My cheapie boughten one is junk.

Mike.
 

ebgb68

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Just a simple project on my new to me mill . An easy way to center things up.on the lathe.
47edf044c9e67cc0ec060acc6d7c09a8.jpg

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
 

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ebgb68

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For my next mill project I will need to use a slotting saw. The blades were bought on Ebay a few months ago, but I still needed an arbor so I made one today.

View attachment 117587

It's for blades with a 5/8" hole. I copied the design from downloaded plans.
What material did you use and we're the plans uploaded here ? I just needed one of these myself thanks for posting.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
 

chevydyl

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Firestopper, yes I assume everyone has the regulators as well, what are you gonna do without them lol, not what I meant tho, what happened to me was I had a brand new bottle of argon, what like 2000psi, and the UHP helium was about 500psi, so just using a y connector to tie the two gases together prior to getting to the machine is not sufficient, argon will flow into the lower pressure bottle, I was able to get it to work but it was very finicky, I would get both regulators showing a 10cfh flow rate, stop and go again and I could tell that the argon bottle was forcing the helium out, it was inconsistent, the inline check valves are a must because of the pressure differential, well as long as you want to maintain your set flow rate.
 

Charles Spencer

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My latest project took several days and doesn't look very impressive at all.

I saw a set of angles on ebay and the price was pretty good, but I didn't know if I already had a similar set so I refrained from bidding. There was no time to check before the auction ended.

To avoid this in the future, I made a "property book" similar to the ones the military uses. I did a pretty good inventory then entered everything into an Excel spreadsheet. I assigned each item a group code and an item code. I also entered size, cost, brand, model, etc.

It turned out that I had quite a bit more than I thought, but did not have the set of angles that I didn't bid on.
 

chevydyl

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There was a bad boy forest fire a few miles from my place this summer, I took pictures of all my stuff, lucked out and the wind shifted, so it didn't cross the river and get me

Supposedly some idiot working on demoing an ol car dumped gas on the ground and lit it off, why idk lol
 

DoogieB

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What material did you use and we're the plans uploaded here ? I just needed one of these myself thanks for posting.
I had to think about this for awhile because at the time I just printed-out the plans and kept them in the shop until needed, but I remembered they were from a Ebay auction. Search on Ebay for "sovereignmachinetool" and in the auction pictures for the arbor they are nice enough to include the drawings. Not that there is anything new here as all these arbors seem to follow the same basic design.

I just used 12L14 for the arbor. It's not like I'm going to wear it out using it a few times a year.

Since many people seemed to dig this project, here's an action shot on the lathe.

arbor_2.jpg

The arbor is ~1.0" at it's largest diameter but you can only get ~3/4" through the old SB's spindle hole so I had to use the steady rest. It worked-out pretty well. Here's you can see the one piece about to be parted-off. Next I was able to do the drilling, tapping and boring in the main part without moving the rest. After that was done, the rest was removed and a bull-nose live center was used to support the work for the turning down to 3/4" at the one end.

It was a fun project. Hopefully I'll be able to see how it works in a few days.
 

magu

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Today I brought home my new to me bridgeport. It is a 1948 series one round ram with the m head. It is small by bridgeport standards, but will be perfect for my small garage.

I loaded it in my s15 (s10) pickup and drove it 3.5 hours home to pittsburgh. From there, it took me an hour to unload the mill with nothing but a harbor freight engine hoist, some not appropriate for the job tools, and a loose understanding of physics.

I got it pretty cheap from a vendor my company deal with because someone had supposedly friction welded a collet into the spindle.... after about another 45 minutes I had the collet and drill chuck out. It Turns out that someone didn't understand how the self extracting drawbar works and in their attempt to remove the tool, they messed up the drawbar, but the collet wasn't particularly stuck.

mill at fps.jpg
View attachment 118023

edited to remove duplicate photos. mill in truck.jpg View attachment 118024
 

Bellwether

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1451451887306.jpg I got my mill with the mechanical tach broken so an electronics whiz friend of mine made me a digital one with some parts he had laying around and some open source code that he found online. I made the housing and put in place of the orginal tach. Works great, looks great. I'm happy.
 

Franko

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Those look great, Carlos. What kind of tool did you cut them with? (I've never made a gear)
 

extropic

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I got my mill with the mechanical tach broken so an electronics whiz friend of mine made me a digital one with some parts he had laying around and some open source code that he found online. I made the housing and put in place of the orginal tach. Works great, looks great. I'm happy.
Any chance of you posting a "How to" thread on your tachometer build/install. Not being an electronics whiz, I would love to see it.
 

brino

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after about another 45 minutes I had the collet and drill chuck out.
Good work magu!
It's great when you rescue a machine and even better when it turns out better than predicted.
Congrats on the "new" equipment.
What's your first project?

-brino
 

Charles Spencer

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Magu, that looks like the size I'd want. Congratulations.

+1!!! It's always surprising how much we all have invested in our avocation.
Yeah, it ran to thirteen pages and a higher dollar value than I thought. I emailed a copy to myself. I figure that way I can check it if I'm out some place and see something. I think I'll make a slimmed down version for ease of reading on my phone by deleting a few columns.
 

Round in circles

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My latest project took several days and doesn't look very impressive at all.

I saw a set of angles on ebay and the price was pretty good, but I didn't know if I already had a similar set so I refrained from bidding. There was no time to check before the auction ended.

To avoid this in the future, I made a "property book" similar to the ones the military uses. I did a pretty good inventory then entered everything into an Excel spreadsheet. I assigned each item a group code and an item code. I also entered size, cost, brand, model, etc.

It turned out that I had quite a bit more than I thought, but did not have the set of angles that I didn't bid on.

Where is the spread sheet stored ..on the computer , on a stick / flash card or in a third party cloud ?
My bro & I live 250 miles apart I hold a 16 GIG memory stick that has the details of all their possessions including photos from several angles & he holds similar for mine just in case of flood ,theft or fire at our homes. When he dies if it's before me I will place all my stuff on a cloud server instead .
 

ebgb68

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I had to think about this for awhile because at the time I just printed-out the plans and kept them in the shop until needed, but I remembered they were from a Ebay auction. Search on Ebay for "sovereignmachinetool" and in the auction pictures for the arbor they are nice enough to include the drawings. Not that there is anything new here as all these arbors seem to follow the same basic design.

I just used 12L14 for the arbor. It's not like I'm going to wear it out using it a few times a year.

Since many people seemed to dig this project, here's an action shot on the lathe.

View attachment 118018

The arbor is ~1.0" at it's largest diameter but you can only get ~3/4" through the old SB's spindle hole so I had to use the steady rest. It worked-out pretty well. Here's you can see the one piece about to be parted-off. Next I was able to do the drilling, tapping and boring in the main part without moving the rest. After that was done, the rest was removed and a bull-nose live center was used to support the work for the turning down to 3/4" at the one end.

It was a fun project. Hopefully I'll be able to see how it works in a few days.
Thanks for the link to the drawing I snagged a copy . Thirtyone bucks is not too bad for that but buying stuff we can make isn't whats its about.
 

extropic

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I had nothing to do with the electronics portion of it, but here are some pictures of the housing I made.
Are the electronics available commercially? They look like a 'kit' rather than 'built from scratch'. Can you post the 'what' and 'where to buy' regarding the kit?

There seems to be a brand name on the main circuit card. Looks like "Pro? Tri?? The wiring is obscuring. Please post details.
 

great white

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Mounted the Cycltrol 150 in the lathe cabinet, started wiring the control panel for it and painted the Baldor 3/4 hp motor to get ready for mounting.
 

royesses

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"Are the electronics available commercially? They look like a 'kit' rather than 'built from scratch'. Can you post the 'what' and 'where to buy' regarding the kit?

There seems to be a brand name on the main circuit card. Looks like "Pro? Tri?? The wiring is obscuring. Please post details."

Don't know if you want only the tach he has, but the Machtach kit is a great tach/sfm kit. I've built 3 of them so far and love them. Henry Arnold the designer is a great guy who is very helpful to deal with.Here's a link:
http://www.machtach.com/
 

f350ca

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Wood working and machine shops do mix. Im building a set of stairs with closed stringers. Nice to have a mill to make the router guide for letting the treads and risers into the stringers.

IMG_2006.jpg

Greg
 

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Bellwether

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Are the electronics available commercially? They look like a 'kit' rather than 'built from scratch'. Can you post the 'what' and 'where to buy' regarding the kit?

There seems to be a brand name on the main circuit card. Looks like "Pro? Tri?? The wiring is obscuring. Please post details.
It's not a kit. I was asking my friend if he could recommend a digital tach and he told me that he could make me one. I honestly know nothing about how he made it. He makes custom superconductor testing robots and prototype electronics for major companies for a living so he has tons of electronics in his shop so he's has the ability to just whip something like this up. I really can't help you out with how he made it..
 

chevydyl

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Got the main body turned for the probe, I still have to flip it and face the one side, prolly throw an angle on it leading up to the styli opening. That 7075 is amazing to work with, stunning shine, just beautiful. But this will be it for the next week or so, back to work at my day job. It'll give me time to finger out the mounting more clearly.
20151230_201841.jpg 20151230_204911.jpg 20151230_204926.jpg
 

extropic

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Don't know if you want only the tach he has, but the Machtach kit is a great tach/sfm kit. I've built 3 of them so far and love them. Henry Arnold the designer is a great guy who is very helpful to deal with. Here's a link:
http://www.machtach.com/
Thank you for throwing a life preserver. The Machtach looks like it will be perfect for me.

It's not a kit. I was asking my friend if he could recommend a digital tach and he told me that he could make me one. I honestly know nothing about how he made it. He makes custom superconductor testing robots and prototype electronics for major companies for a living so he has tons of electronics in his shop so he's has the ability to just whip something like this up. I really can't help you out with how he made it..
Thanks anyway.
 
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