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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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mmcmdl

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Had to make a pin setting gage at work last night with four .250 slots equally spaced at 11.000 . Our shop mill ( Clausing Kondia ) has a 48" table with a non-working x axis readout and x axis power feed . Wouldn't you know it , couldn't get the 33" travel I needed . So , I put 2 tooling holes in the 67.5" long gage and had to pick them up and work backwards , then forwards and also compensate for the backlash . After cutting these slots , the boss realized we had a bigger mill in our lower shop with a working DRO that I could use to check the true position of the slots . I had 3 perfectly spaced slots at 11.005 instead of the 11.000 needed . Leadscrew error ! Tonight I will make the 4 blocks over , then take and re-machine the slots on the bigger mill . After the results , the big man said he will allocate the $$$ and we will now be getting a new workable DRO for our mill finally . Hot darn .
 

HBilly1022

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I finished the mounting plate for my new QCTP.
upload_2016-5-13_21-45-29.png

Here it is with the old one on the left, the plate that came with the QCTP in the middle and the new one on the right.
upload_2016-5-13_21-47-37.png

and mounted in the compound.
upload_2016-5-13_21-48-48.png

the QCTP mounted on the compound and all looks good
upload_2016-5-13_21-50-40.png

until I check the tool height. With the adjuster set as low as possible it is still too high.
upload_2016-5-13_21-55-53.png

I took 0.065" off the bottom of the tool holder and all was good again. Then I welded a cap on a steel pipe and concreted it into the ground for basketball hoop for the grandsons. One of them helped by painting the pole, helping dig the hole and mixing the concrete.
upload_2016-5-13_21-59-24.png
 

JimDawson

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I had to rework a few plastic parts I made for a customer. What happened is that I made them on the router out of a 48x96x1 sheet of UHMW. There were stresses built up in the plastic and when I machined the top features, the plastic tried to curl up across the width and I lost the vacuum then things really went to he!! before I caught it and screwed the parts down to the table. The edges were messed up so I had to take a profile cut on the outside to clean it up.
upload_2016-5-13_22-19-29.png

So how to hang onto a part and touch all of the outside edges? The good news is the the parts have six 1/4 inch screw holes in them. So I grabbed three 3/4 inch aluminum drops off of the shelf, drilled and countersunk them and bolted them down to the table. Then took a cleanup pass to provide a flat work surface.
upload_2016-5-13_22-18-41.png

Then drilled & tapped a 1/4-20 hole pattern to match the part hole pattern, I used flat head philips screws so that the countersink taper would tend to center the part on the holes. Easy to install and remove with my little Botch 1/4 drive impact. The parts finish at about 0.020 undersize, but this is a non-critical dimension so no problem. I'm not about to buy another $1000 sheet of plastic just for this little issue.;)

upload_2016-5-13_22-25-37.png
 

dave_r_1

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The only thing to come out of my shop today was frustration and a deeper realization of just how much I have to learn. Nothing like spending an hour+ to prep a tool only to snap it after 10 minutes of use.

I'll try again tomorrow. If that doesn't work maybe I'll go back to just woodworking. But I doubt it.
Someone, somewhere, had a tool snap on them resulting in a significant portion of it winding up inside them. Today, that person was not you.

Tomorrow, who knows?
 

Charles Spencer

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started cleaning mine, arghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
I like cleaning my little shop. Yesterday I took a couple of hours for cleaning and maintenance. The day before I had gone to Lowes and looked for metal for the first time. The prices weren't bad so I bought a few bars. Then some aluminum I had ordered came in. I put that away and noticed that a couple of my chip trays (cookie sheets) were getting kind of full so I emptied them. I had recently put an old Atlas drill press together and that had reminded to lube the one in my shop. So then I cleaned both my lathes and oiled them thoroughly. I had done the same to my mill about a week or so ago. And of course I swept up and put everything away.

Today is supposed to be a beautiful day here. After I run a couple of errands I will walk into my nice clean shop, leave the door open, and make things while listening to the afternoon baseball game on the radio. Fun!
 

intjonmiller

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Someone, somewhere, had a tool snap on them resulting in a significant portion of it winding up inside them. Today, that person was not you.

Tomorrow, who knows?
Fair enough. Though my good habits of safety gear and standing out of the path of a tool's arc as much as possible certainly help reduce the odds of that.

I have dozens of parting tools which are all 0.100" too tall for my tool post. I currently have a budget of whatever is in my loose change jar for a qctp or new parting tools (obviously I will go with the former) so I figured out how to mount my t-style T15 tool steel cutoff tools upside-down in my screwless vise, level and protruding from the top of the vise without owning a set of parallels, and I ground down the bottom in the surface grinder. Do you know how long it takes to grind 0.100" of T15 CPM on a surface grinder? Do you know how many other operations I would have preferred to be doing? But I was determined to make it work with what I have. I only got halfway through the 4" aluminum.

I had thought my skills were sufficient to make a 4" aluminum cylinder for use as a sacrificial glue chuck. Apparently I'm not even there yet. I'll finish with the hacksaw today so at least I can keep going on this part. Wishing I hadn't loaned out my sawzall...
 

intjonmiller

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One of those days. We had to mow the lawn, and then I was free to spend the rest of the day in the shop. The three older kids are at their mother's house for the weekend and my wife is going shopping with her sister and their sons. Freedom! Right?

Nope. Riding lawn mower won't start. Battery is charged (and has a solar battery maintainer permanently connected), I've cleaned all the contacts, and I can't get it to turn over. Not even a click. Battery voltage doesn't drop in the slightest when I turn the key, so where's the problem??

Forget it. I am NOT spending a free day fixing an old mower. I have a plug-in electric that I use to run around the perimeter and tight spots. I'll just use it to mow the whole thing today and get it done.

Nope. It tripped a breaker. 12 gauge cord, 13 amp motor, so that's not the problem. I'll have to dig in after all.

Fascinating that both are having electrical problems at the same time. I blame the ranting about electricians that is going on in the Bozos thread lately. Bad karma or something. :(
 

TOOLMASTER

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i played the dead battery game monday...dragged my battery to wally world..they were all out..drug it over to auto zone..they had a nice high amperage battery for mowers...starts great now
 

intjonmiller

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I previously removed the battery pan from this thing and made a newer, much larger one to hold a serious battery. I will be very surprised if that's the problem (especially since there is no voltage drop when I turn the key).
 

intjonmiller

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So... Who wants to help me troubleshoot this thing? :)

I've replaced all sorts of AC motors, up to 7 HP 480V 3 Phase, but I have no experience and minimal knowledge about DC motors. I know there's a bridge rectifier, a safety lockout switch, and a two pole brushed DC motor. (Are they all two pole?) There is a tiny crack in the surface of the bridge rectifier, right next to the mounting screw, and charring on the motor mount right beside/above the rectifier. Seems to me that the rectifier is fried.

9e9f88169b9e8673d238868d4c905bda.jpg

A new one is $9 on Amazon. I would be delighted if that's all that's wrong here. But how do I determine if that's all that's wrong here? It seems to me that it is unlikely that the charring could have come from heat/sparks thrown by the motor itself because it's too focused right there. If it had come from the windings/brushes/stator/commutator/whatever below it would probably be more spread by this height.

A few more photos for context:

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6537616afa739773ed3feb187951b7cf.jpg
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$9 is a great price for a repair part on a project like this. But I have no interest in paying that if there's something else wrong. I have a Greenlee TK-30AGFI multimeter, so with instructions I can theoretically do any tests it's capable of. Less accessible are my brothers' professional models, but AC motors are not their field so I'm asking here since there's such a great group with a wide range of knowledge and experience.

Thanks? :)
 

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Franko

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I've had very good experience purchasing batteries at a web site called 'Battery Shark.' I've purchased motorcycle and ATV batteries that would cost me $70 — $100 locally for $25 — $35, shipped.
 

intjonmiller

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Looks like these rectifiers go out with some regularity. I think I'll add a better heat sink (I have several in my to-melt aluminum scrap bin) and some thermal paste to hopefully prevent this problem in the future. Seems like some actual air circulation would also be in order. The cover is clearly designed to seal "completely", yet there was an incredible amount of grass clippings (roughly 1/3 of which, by height, had turned to rich soil) all around the top of the deck and base of the motor. The seal isn't working anyway, so perhaps adding a filtered air vent would be a good idea.


When it was connected in the back yard it tripped the breaker. But in the garage it didn't, so I'm thinking that's when it actually blew. And that has me concerned about my garage wiring (which I've wanted to upgrade anyway; only one 20 amp circuit for 120V and one 30 amp circuit for 240V). No GFCI, and presumably a poor ground connection. I guess this was a good thing to happen after all. :)
 
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cathead

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A bridge rectifier is simply 4 diodes hooked in a ring. You can test all four
diodes to determine if each one conducts one way but not the other.
Usually a bad diode will be shorted if it fails from an overload. If it trips
the breaker, you can be relatively sure the diodes are shorted.



edit: For clarification, this can be accomplished with any simple analog
or digital volt-ohm meter. Personally I prefer an analog meter
for these kinds of tests but a digital one would work as well.
I use the X100 scale in resistance (ohms) for this as
one can quickly see the forward and backward resistances.
 
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hman

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One way to test the motor itself would be to totally disconnect it from everything else, then connect a car battery across it with some jumper cables or something similar. Obviously, it won't run at full speed ... but it should at least turn over. If it shows no sign of wanting to turn at all, the motor is probably bad. If it goes at all, it's probably OK, and your problem is likely elsewhere else (like the rectifier, switch(es), wiring, etc.
 

intjonmiller

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Today had to be productive. I would have kicked myself all week at work if it hadn't been. I got a lot of stuff cleaned up in my little shop. It's so crowded (1950s excuse for a 1 car garage, with wood and metal working equipment) that any project makes a huge mess, even though it really isn't that much stuff.

One thing that has been driving me nuts is that I don't have anywhere for lathe tools yet. I'm planning on building a cabinet with many shallow drawers below the chip tray, but that's going to have to wait until I wrap up some other things. The space above/behind the lathe is also wasted, so that's where I focused today.

I made two shelves. The lower shelf is 5" deep, the upper 10". Size was dictated by the scrap on hand. Both are made of 1/2" plywood on top with a 2" plywood skirt around the sides to stiffen it. The shelves bridge the window, which is why the reinforcing skirt was necessary instead of just more brackets.

I had a 20" strip of LED lights leftover from another project, so I mounted them on the underside of the upper shelf, about 3" from the front. That way it casts light well in front of the lathe, but my eyes are shielded by the shelf skirt. My dad is the only other one I expect to use the lathe at any point in the foreseeable future, and he's my height so this should work very well.

I also have a 4"x6" grid of LEDs (MUCH brighter) which I will mount on an articulating arm (just as soon as I build it...) for more focused and intense light where/as needed.

Finally the lathe and the light will be on the same power strip switch, so the light will serve as a reminder when I'm leaving the shop that the lathe still has power. By switching it off at my head-height my 6 year-old son won't be able to turn it on should he feel so inclined.

10ab9958180a68036635ab76044d0d76.jpg
 

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intjonmiller

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A bridge rectifier is simply 4 diodes hooked in a ring. You can test all four
diodes to determine if each one conducts one way but not the other.
Usually a bad diode will be shorted if it fails from an overload. If it trips
the breaker, you can be relatively sure the diodes are shorted.
Thank you for all the tips! When I searched for how to test a rectifier the results I found showed guys using power supplies and a diode test mode on a much nicer multimeter than mine. I'll test the impedance of the rectifier and the lower voltage motor test tomorrow.
 

dave_r_1

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Bought a Snapper 52 hydro walk behind mower and then worked on servicing it. Lubed and changed engine oil/filter, sharpened blades. Used my fancy home-made blade sharpener, which worked great. The blades were so dull, after sharpening each side of a blade, I had to adjust the grinding wheel down.

Still to do:
-replace the hydraulic fluid/filter [not done because I couldn't get the filter today]
-figure out how to inflate one of the front tires. can't get it to seal along the bead, tried wiping/rubbing the tire and rim surface down with a rag, spraying on windex [helps with making it seal just enough to get air pressure to hold it on the bead, didn't work], trying green slime around the bead on each side overnight and see about inflating it tomorrow. If that doesn't work, see I can get proper "rim sealant"
-fix the deck height adjustment screws. it's stupid that they are way up at the front of the deck and sticking up above the frame, so something solid can hit them and bent them over a bit, and they are threaded screws...

It's a little tricky to drive, left and right levers on a horizontal handlebar, you have to hold both in the 'middle' of their range of travel to be stationary, you release [so it goes forward] one or both levers to turn forwards/go forward, and pull one or both levers to turn in reverse/go in reverse. And it's faster than my Gravely Zero Turn. There will be a little bit of a learning curve for me.

Bone-headed mistake of the day: while warming up the motor to change the oil, was leaning over to look at the hydraulic system, and placed my hand squarely on the spinning air inlet on the top of the motor [the grill just over the fan that pushes air over the rest of the motor]. Fortunately, the bolts holding the grill only damaged a bit of my thumb, rest of the fingertips just have a good rubbing-burn thing happening.
 

bmw rider

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This was a welding project not machining, but had to make room on my welding cart for a new TIG welder. The cart was a donation from a friend originally and I had made it work for my MIG and Gas setups. I had to do a bit of reworking when I upgraded my MIG to the Miller 211 from the cheapo one I started with. Still, it was an ugle abomination of a cart. This time I had to do a bit more work to fit the new TIG. I cut half of the top deck off and fabbed up a two tier rack to hold the welders. I decided it deserved a coat of paint this time as well rather than the bare rusty metal it had always been. Haven't tested the new welder yet, have to get a bottle for it yet. I'll be doing lots of practice to learn the process as I've never used a TIG before. Lots of gas welding in years past though, so I understand the basic technique, just need to learn to apply that to TIG welding. I've found a few good tutorials online, but am open to any direction to other good sources. Once I figure out plain steel, I'll move up to aluminum and stainless which are part of the reason for the TIG.

2016-05-13%2011.04.55.jpg

2016-05-13%2011.05.08.jpg
 

xman_charl

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finished my static rotor balancer last night after a ton of futzing around and it works! It always stops with one part of the flywheel down and will even reverse direction to rotate to that point if it goes past it. Didn't have time to do an drilling and testing last night, that's on the list for tonight. Really excited about getting this balanced better and having a nice smooth motor on the lathe.

View attachment 128930 View attachment 128931
Do you have access to another lathe? Might put it between centers on another
lathe, check it will running. Indicate for run out first.

Charl
 

mattthemuppet

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Do you have access to another lathe? Might put it between centers on another
lathe, check it will running. Indicate for run out first.

Charl
good idea, but sadly just the one lathe. If I'd thought it through, I would have used the LH threaded arbor I made to turn the flywheel true before taking the other pulley off the motor (and before painting the flywheel!). Just never thought it would be that out of round and out of balance!

I did get it largely balanced, much less vibration now. I'll post pics in a bit :)

I am however doing what you suggested for another treadmill motor - truing the pulley and flywheel between centers (actually, 4 jaw and center) before doing the same balance job I did for my lathe motor. Hopefully that'll cure any vibration problems before they start :)
 

mark_f

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good idea, but sadly just the one lathe. If I'd thought it through, I would have used the LH threaded arbor I made to turn the flywheel true before taking the other pulley off the motor (and before painting the flywheel!). Just never thought it would be that out of round and out of balance!

I did get it largely balanced, much less vibration now. I'll post pics in a bit :)

I am however doing what you suggested for another treadmill motor - truing the pulley and flywheel between centers (actually, 4 jaw and center) before doing the same balance job I did for my lathe motor. Hopefully that'll cure any vibration problems before they start :)
Is there a reason you are using the treadmill flywheel? Why not take it off and put a pulley on.
 

mattthemuppet

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bunch of reasons:

- smaller pulley than I can get with a V-belt (min. 2in diameter - what I put on originally - for a 1/2in belt and even then it slipped occasionally). I wanted to gear down the motor so the spindle rpm range was more useful
- less slippage, although that's not a big deal as there's only a 3/8 v belt going to the spindle
- pulley should be concentric to the motor spindle = less vibration (ha!). It wasn't trivial adapting a V-pulley to the motor spindle and although it worked, it was hard to get it running true. If I'd made on from scratch with the LH threads and right bore size, that would probably not have been a big deal
- more mass/ rotational inertia for heavy or interrupted cuts. Motor speed used to vary a fair bit (simple MC controller), now with the flywheel on it doesn't vary much at all, even though I have only a couple of hours on it.
- built in fan. I made one for mine out of a 120mm PC fan which worked wonderfully until I accidentally moved the lathe a smidge and forgot to move it back. V belt pushed fan into fan shroud = no fan = hot motor :(

The smaller pulley (and larger countershaft pulley) alone has made a huge difference - low gear is now 300-1000rpm instead of 600-2000rpm, which means I don't have to use the back gears quite as much. My lowest useable speed is now 30rpm :)
 

mark_f

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Are you using the control from the treadmill or some other power supply and controller? I looked at the PWM controllers on the Bay for cheap, but I would need a 90 VDC supply at 10 amps which is difficult to get. So I get a DC motor controller for about $80 of the Bay.
 
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