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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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intjonmiller

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roadie33

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When I bought my lathe I got a bucket with all kinds of bits in it. More than I'll ever use. Sizes from 1/4" to 3/4".
MoMax, Rex AAA and some Circle C and other names I can't remember at the moment. It took a better part of a day to sort thru them. I just ended up sorting by size and putting them in a divider box I picked up from HF with a see thru lid.
Jon is correct on the Circle C bits. They are hard to grind and are really shiny. But once ground, they will cut just about anything.
If I remember next time I am in the shop, I'll try and snap a pic.
 

Charles Spencer

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Last week at the dump I found about 10 or 12 rusty hack saw blades. They were held together by a bit of wire through their end holes. They seemed to be sharp, just a bit rusty. So I took them home, cleaned off the rust, and oiled them.

Today I needed to make about 30 cuts through 1" square steel bar stock using my Craftsman Hack Saw:

HPIM0831.JPG

I used one of those found blades. Worked great and made me feel smart and thrifty.
 
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chevydyl

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Nice find, I got my treadmill from the dump, brought it home gutted the motor and control then brought it back
 

f350ca

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Charlie was building a fire pit at the back of the shed for him and his buddies to drink beer around. So I said we can improve on that, sort of a hold my beer and watch this.
Had a surplus forge blower someone gave me, a piece of 2 inch pipe with an elbow and we have forced draft.
IMG_2192.jpg

Will melt an aluminum can in about 10 to 15 seconds.

IMG_2199.jpg

Greg
 

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JimDawson

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Today I made two sets of Lathe Donuts!

First bolt a 6 x 6.75 x 1 1018 steel plate down to the mill table (MDF under)

upload_2016-5-20_22-16-35.png

Then grab a 1/4 inch x 1 inch DOC, solid carbide router bit
upload_2016-5-20_22-17-38.png

Then start cutting, 0.062 DOC, 1800 RPM, 5 IPM (have to go slow because the tool is so spindly), Kerosene for cutting oil because that's what I had in the tank.
upload_2016-5-20_22-32-27.png

Let run for about 2.5 hrs while I work on my corner smoothing software mods for my router and clean the shop.;) The corner smoothing software mod worked perfectly, and I vacuumed up 55 gal of plastic chips.

The tool bit is 0.248, and the parts are laid out 0.270 apart.
upload_2016-5-20_22-23-30.png

And milling is finished
upload_2016-5-20_22-30-44.png

Next over to the lathe and drill 15/16 and bore to 1.002. Dial everything in on the first part, then ''trust the dials''. I have no idea how accurate the cross slide screw is, but it's very repeatable and in this case, that's all I care about. Drill hole, dial to 0.010, make a pass. Dial to 0, make a another pass, reverse the carriage drive, and run the spring pass on the way out, and done. I normally would have used a shorter boring bar, but that's what was in the holder.
upload_2016-5-20_22-34-0.png

And here they are. They still need set screws, but it's getting late and I'm tired. Time to quit for the day before I do something stupid.:cautious: There is always tomorrow!
upload_2016-5-20_22-46-28.png


These are used on glass blowing lathes. Here's a pic I grabbed off of the net. The ones shown in the pic are are round, but the ones I made have a 120° angle machined on them so they will close down to about 3/16. Those are 3 jaw, glass blowing, scroll chucks, both the headstock and tailstock are powered. A little different that what we normally see.

upload_2016-5-20_22-47-9.png
 
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Bamban

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Paco,

That table on wheels is nicely done, almost perfect for a lathe stand with that steel top plate. If for hire, someday I would love to commission you to build a heavy all steel stand for my ACER Trump 1236. A trip to Tucson to pick it up would be worth the short drive from Austin for such a work of art. Meeting you and Mark and a get together for a nice dinner would be the icing.

nez
 

firestopper

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Paco,

That table on wheels is nicely done, almost perfect for a lathe stand with that steel top plate. If for hire, someday I would love to commission you to build a heavy all steel stand for my ACER Trump 1236. A trip to Tucson to pick it up would be worth the short drive from Austin for such a work of art. Meeting you and Mark and a get together for a nice dinner would be the icing.

nez
Hi Nez,

Funny you should mention a "lathe stand", in fact, I started designing a rolling lathe tooling table a few months ago (in my head) to house all chucks,face plate,steady/follow rest etc, the top side will have 5C collets,QCTP rack and all 3 M/T tail stock tooling. It might be a little while before I can start another "My project" but the beauty (for me) is by the time get to it I have given the project a lot of thought as I never design on paper, sure I'll sketch a crude free hand drawing, but I build in phases with three or four "next steps" in my head. This method has proved handy for catching potential conflicts instead of re-work. I do like to follow prints/shop drawing provided by customers, but for my own stuff, I build and tweak as I go.
I would love to build your lathe stand as well as meet and break bread, I'm sure Mark would appreciate it as well. I might pick your brain on gun builds though.:cool 2:

So many talented folks here, I realize I have a long way to go but I'm constantly learning, and honing my abilities.

In closing, I had a very tragic call at work this past tour, I lost a brother from a near by FD. Someone whom I trained with and mirrored my age, years of service and skill level.
I was the first medic on scene as I'm on a pumper with two more medics arriving 2 minutes later. We gave it hell but could not clear his airway. The ER surgically removed the block deep in his airway, however was deprived of o2 for much too long. The family decided to take him off life support three days ago. I'm writing this with very wet eyes and a heavy heart as I continue to struggle with his loss and personal failure,but I want to share this with you all because if it wasn't for the shop work and the ability to create things with my mind and hands, I would be a mess. God gave me an appetite for learning and working with my hands, I choose to continue to do so despite my worn out neck, and back. If I choose to not step into the shop, then I would end up depressed, divorced and another sad statistic. Probably not the right place to write and share this event, but I just feel the need to share.
Turn and burn.....
 
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FOMOGO

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My condolences on your loss Paco. Had to be tough to be there and not be able bring him back. I can relate to the shop being a saving grace, even when the body is not so willing. Hang in there, as this too shall pass. Mike
 

Bamban

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I could only imagine the loss and guilt, brother. I hear the same stories of self imposed failures from my closest shooting buddy, a combat medic with the 101, 67-68 in RVN. It's been years with him, the memories of the kids he wasn't able to save still haunt him, but openly talking about helped him a lot. Glad you opened up about it.

Hang in there, brother.

On the stand, when the time comes we talk more about it. My requirement is very simple, the LxWxH, the rest let your imagination soar. Last thing, the heavier, the better.
 

firestopper

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Thanks so much fellas,

I tend to keep things to myself only sharing with my wife. I just wanted to encourage as many as I could to find an outlet when life throws you a screwball. It has helped me more than I can ever express. I don't need meds for coping, just some time to build something.

The services are today at 15:00, I will attend and pay my respects to a good man.
 

HBilly1022

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Sorry to hear about the loss of your brother in the field ... but glad to hear you have a method of dealing with it that does not negatively affect yourself or the ones you love. Be strong, better days are ahead.
 

intjonmiller

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Bought a surface grinder. Going Monday to pick it up. Its a 2 hour drive each way. I will post pics of course. :)
There are much worse things than a drive through the Carolinas. I only spent about 10 weeks out there but it was absolutely beautiful. Also it was June-August and I was not conditioned for that kind of heat and humidity. But very beautiful.
 

intjonmiller

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And now I scroll and see the next posts.

Man, that is rough. I can only try to imagine how that affects you both now and going forward. Thank you for your service and dedication.
 

NCjeeper

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There are much worse things than a drive through the Carolinas. I only spent about 10 weeks out there but it was absolutely beautiful. Also it was June-August and I was not conditioned for that kind of heat and humidity. But very beautiful.
You are correct. It will be mostly interstate travel so the sights wont be that great.
 

intjonmiller

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In some ways I really liked how back east only some routes have interstate options. Far more interesting drives. Out here (Utah and neighboring states) there are precious few destinations more than about 20 miles off of an interstate. You have to plan to figure out a route that will be more enjoyable (for a motorcycle ride, for instance). On the other hand out there when I wanted to get somewhere quickly it was frustrating to not have an interstate in the area. I was in Georgetown, SC (45 minutes or so south of Myrtle Beach), but I've had similar experiences in Virginia and New York-Connecticut, particularly the area east of Poughkeepsie, or anywhere east of the Hudson for that matter, and again in Kingston-Saugerties and west to Woodstock and beyond. Beautiful but slow.
 

MozamPete

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I won an old car mirror assemble station in and on-line auction for about US$85 - basically because it was constructed out of T-slot aluminium extrusion which I have a use for in a future project. Pick it up in the middle of the week and finished dimantling the mechanical side today (as it was taking up too much space in my workshop and I couldn't do and anything else with it in the way).

3f143521-adef-4838-9a16-8e7b297cd545_fullsize.jpg

Inside the bottom cabinet

e3b81b9f-3d5a-46d7-8ef7-5c4525ad1ad0_fullsize.jpg

Came away with a total of 8 pneumatic servomototors all with position sensors, 1 rotary pneumatic sevro, 6 liniear bearings and rods, 4 resistive position sensors, 4 optical position sensors, ~15 pneumatic solinoid valves, 6 pressure regulators, pneumatic filter/water trap and a fair bit of aluminum plate and brackets (the table top is made from 10mm thick Al plate) - plus over 20m of T-slot extrusion.

Still have the electrical cabinet on the back to strip down which has a full PLC with about 10 I/O cards and the screen, 4 power supplies, bar code scanner, circuit breakers, relays, rail and terminal blocks, etc which will all be stored away for future repurposing.

Quite amasing what goes into assembling and testing a car mirror these days.
 

Franko

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Great score, Peter! I, my very self, could find use for some of that t-slot aluminum extrusion.
 

FOMOGO

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Looks like you hit the jackpot on that test station. Well done Peter. Might be time to start on some kind of fantastical Rube Goldberg machine with all of that hardware. Cheers, Mike
 

mksj

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Hi Paco, sorry to hear about your friends loss. It is very difficult when this happens in front of you and there is nothing more one can do. I have coded a number of friends family members in years past, I have never forgotten when we could not pull one through. Working in the shop is therapeutic for many of us, fortunately we have our health today (and minds), and we can enjoy our time thinking and working with our hands.

Nez, you are always welcome to come up and stay at our place and have a get together with Paco.

Been busy the last couple of days building another VFD control system for a PM1340GT, this one threw me a wrinkle that had me scratching my head for awhile. This particular build uses two proximity sensors, one attaches to the micrometer stop and controls the stop position of the feed toward the headstock. The second can be used in a number of different places, either as a stop on the power cross feed or a Z axis feed stop in the Z direction toward the tailstock. There have been a few occasions where this could be handy if you are doing a repetitive procedure between two positions, or to prevent crashing into the tailstock center when you reverse the machine direction. I can think of a number of occasions when this would have been handy, especially small stock with an extended nose center.

So the quandary with this build, I originally had though that the two proximity stops connect be connected serially, kind of like Christmas tree lights. It ended up that the sensors need to be attached to power on input side and a load on the output side, there is also a negative power supply connection. Well if you have two in a chain the first one will not see the load and the second one won't turn on, and the second one ends up shorting its input to the negative side of the power supply until it turns on., so it shorts the first sensor to the negative. Fortunately these proximity sensors are internally protected from overload and it shuts down if the current limit is exceeded. I finally figured what was going on by measuring the current/voltage in different wires. The solution was to limit the power to negative side of the power supply of the second sensor by adding a resistor in this this lead. This allows the first sensor to turn on without overloading and supply power to the next sensor which then turns on. At least that is what I think is happening. Anyway, all finished with the system build, all the VFD logic works correctly.

This system build has a wide range of features incorporated into it, so it is a very tight fit. The lathe control box on the PM1340GT is very small, this control board will fit in with almost 0 clearance on either side. The lathe has a 240VAC single phase coolant pump, so a breaker and a coolant contactor was incorporated into the build, the contactor is only activated when the lathe spindle direction switch is engaged. A joystick operates the jog in either direction, two braking rates (fast and slow) that defaults to fast (1 second) if the sensor or safety stop switches are triggered. The front panel controls are all 24VDC, the VFD input terminals are on a separate control circuit operated by the relays. There is terminals for 24VDC and 12VDC to run low voltage lights, tach, etc. The proximity sensor holder for the micrometer has some additional tweaks and was finally able to find a higher quality micro limit switch which switches the system down if the P sensor fails (or operator error). Next will be the installation and the VFD programming, hopefully that go smoothly at this point.

PM1340GT Build 1.jpg
PM1340GT Build 12.jpg
 

kvt

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Got a deal at the auction this week end, John Deere 3000 psi Gas powered pressure washer, Looked like heck but has a Honda engine, extra hose etc. Took a whiff of the gas, BOy was that something must have been old when they put it In there. Put new gas in it, kept trying to start, still nothing. Finally took the carb off cleaned it and everything, Put it back together and finally got it started. Then the longer it ran the better it did. Now have a fully functional pressure washer, all for under 100,
 
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