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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

f350ca

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Doing repairs on the thumb of an excavator. The bushings came loose in the caps, maybe stretched? Bored the caps oversized to remove the taper in the bore then made new aluminum bronze bushings. Need to warm the caps up with a propane weed burner to about 600F for a 3 thou shrink fit.
KIMG0447.JPG

Greg
 

Tony Wells

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Probably will shrink the bushing ID a bit once in place, so unless you are line boring them in situ, make sure your pin fits properly.
 

f350ca

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Been there before Tony and got bit. Have the bore 2 thou over. Its going on the old shaft that has some wear, if it was a new shaft I'd bore them after shrinking them in.

Greg
 

rdean

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Finished up a project for the wife. She wanted to try her hand at making wooden pens and one of the first steps is to drill a hole through the wood blank for the bushing. I saw a two jaw chuck made for just this process but didn't want to spend the money they wanted so I decided to try and make one.
This is the finished chuck with an extra long piece of wood blank installed and mounted on a face plate.
GEDC3332s.jpg

What it looks like from this end.
GEDC3321s.jpg

The thumb screws adjust the wood sideways to find the center.

The slots I milled for the jaws turned out very nice and tight..
GEDC3313s.jpg

And a shot of all the parts made.
GEDC3309s.jpg

It is not nearly as accurate as a 4 jaw but it doesn't have to be. There is quite a bit of extra wood that needs to be removed so if the hole is not exactly in the center it doesn't matter.
Ease of use was a primary goal for the wife.
Very easy to adjust and use.

Thanks
Ray
 

sanddan

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Been there before Tony and got bit. Have the bore 2 thou over. Its going on the old shaft that has some wear, if it was a new shaft I'd bore them after shrinking them in.

Greg
Right on, I used to use a 75% rule of thumb on bushing shrink fits. The bore would reduce by 75% of the interference. It does vary somewhat based on dia and bushing thickness. The larger the dia and/or thinner the ring the closer you get to 100%.
 

zmotorsports

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Right on, I used to use a 75% rule of thumb on bushing shrink fits. The bore would reduce by 75% of the interference. It does vary somewhat based on dia and bushing thickness. The larger the dia and/or thinner the ring the closer you get to 100%.
Similar to what I've used. I would use the .001" per inch of bore for the interference fit then anticipate the ID reducing by approx. 75% of the interference calculated. Not always exact but usually damn close.

Mike
 

zmotorsports

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I was able to get some more work done on my work bench cupboard doors last night. Welded some strap down the hinge side to give a little more support then wiped down and painted with Rustoleum Hammered paint to match the benches themselves.









I also scrounged through my limited supply of sheet and found some 16-gauge brushed aluminum that is just enough for the two doors but not enough for the one side of the storage compartment on the 6’ bench. I was able to also find some 16-gauge polished ATP but seeing as how I have nothing else in the shop that is ATP nor polished I think I will install the ATP with the flat side out and tread in so it more closely matches the coloring of the sheet on the doors.


While the paint was drying on the door frames I took my patio furniture from the deck and put it up on the mezzanine so it will be out of the weather throughout the winter.

Tonight I was going to finish them up but just got a call from my upholstery guy and he can possibly get going on my Jeep seats tomorrow afternoon if I can get them to him and he had a cancellation for next week and jump right on my coach seats/couches then so for the next couple of nights I will be removing interiors.



Mike
 

f350ca

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Probably will shrink the bushing ID a bit once in place, so unless you are line boring them in situ, make sure your pin fits properly.
Got propane for the weed burner and warmed the housings today. Totally by luck it reduced the bore 0.002 as planned. Even blind squirrel finds an acorn now and then.

Greg
 

zmotorsports

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I was able to get my doors for the work benches tonight.

I also closed in the side of the 6’ Work bench.
c7b2850af689edf68f93a3ed0a0ec4ac.jpg

The 16-gauge aluminum measured and marked for cutting.
0f20af7fa4c02f2191499d8068106347.jpg

After cutting to size and deburring I marked out a line 4” in from the perimeter to add a small kustom touch.
b5e344db2dad67d044f42f301b3265c6.jpg

Dug out the bead roller and installed the step dies.
43734d458ac027aac69b19fb5059faee.jpg

I think it gives the doors a bit of dimension.
98b7f9f563ac175c75a109f5087ab12e.jpg

I picked up some inexpensive small tapered brushed finish handles a few weeks ago. I thought these would be low profile enough to not catch on my shop apron while working at the bench.
b38ce12430843279f497106a05abcda8.jpg

I think they finish off the work benches quite nicely.
e65a2d9384f30abf5849746212053af3.jpg

a1c43008535aaffe8186e07d9146ec23.jpg

f3b3a1eef4bdddbe22714a994cc9018f.jpg

That’s another small project marked off the to-do list.

Thanks for looking.

Mike
 

firestopper

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Nice work Mike, very clean indeed. Tell us more about your bead roller, it looks like nice quality and light considering the mass. Have you considered modifying the mount to fit your 2" receiver you incorporated on your bench? Faster and safer for a one man show IMO.
Shop is looking great Mike.
 

zmotorsports

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Nice work Mike, very clean indeed. Tell us more about your bead roller, it looks like nice quality and light considering the mass. Have you considered modifying the mount to fit your 2" receiver you incorporated on your bench? Faster and safer for a one man show IMO.
Shop is looking great Mike.
Thanks Paco, I appreciate the feedback. Shop is coming together and I LOVE working in my new shop. If I didn't have to sleep I would spend every waking minute out there.

My bead roller is a Mitler Bros. powered unit but I wouldn't exactly call it light, it is still quite heavy and awkward to move around but works out much better for me where I have it somewhat portable and don't have to have it set up all the time. It originally had a stand where it either could be bolted to the ground or a roll cart but when I purchased it I cut the base off and welded the flat strap on it to clamp to the welding table and I could store it by hanging it on the wall vs. on the floor in the corner of the shop somewhere. I may build a hitch stub to fit into a 2" receiver and then weld another receiver or two under my welding table. I like the height that it is when used at my welding table vs. my work benches so I doubt I will use it at the benches.

I really haven't used it too much in the past couple of years but back when I was racing and building sand rails I used it a lot for building fuel tanks, coolant tanks, aluminum side panels, etc. and really like the fact that it is powered. The footswitch is a rheostat so the speed can be varied somewhat which is nice for turning corners or even bead rolling flames into a panel. My buddy has a Pexto manual unit which is a very high end roller but where you have to crank the handle it becomes very cumbersome to use in my opinion. On small panels such as fuel tanks the manual one works fine but on long parts like the side panels to a sandrail that are 6-8 feet in length the manual one really needs two people to make a smooth uniform bead and not look jagged or notched on curves. The powered one is so nice and smooth to do curves with. Even small parts such as tank rolls I still like the powered unit for ease and fluid movements.

Thanks for the comments Paco.

Mike
 

firestopper

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Thanks Paco, I appreciate the feedback. Shop is coming together and I LOVE working in my new shop. If I didn't have to sleep I would spend every waking minute out there.

My bead roller is a Mitler Bros. powered unit but I wouldn't exactly call it light, it is still quite heavy and awkward to move around but works out much better for me where I have it somewhat portable and don't have to have it set up all the time. It originally had a stand where it either could be bolted to the ground or a roll cart but when I purchased it I cut the base off and welded the flat strap on it to clamp to the welding table and I could store it by hanging it on the wall vs. on the floor in the corner of the shop somewhere. I may build a hitch stub to fit into a 2" receiver and then weld another receiver or two under my welding table. I like the height that it is when used at my welding table vs. my work benches so I doubt I will use it at the benches.

I really haven't used it too much in the past couple of years but back when I was racing and building sand rails I used it a lot for building fuel tanks, coolant tanks, aluminum side panels, etc. and really like the fact that it is powered. The footswitch is a rheostat so the speed can be varied somewhat which is nice for turning corners or even bead rolling flames into a panel. My buddy has a Pexto manual unit which is a very high end roller but where you have to crank the handle it becomes very cumbersome to use in my opinion. On small panels such as fuel tanks the manual one works fine but on long parts like the side panels to a sandrail that are 6-8 feet in length the manual one really needs two people to make a smooth uniform bead and not look jagged or notched on curves. The powered one is so nice and smooth to do curves with. Even small parts such as tank rolls I still like the powered unit for ease and fluid movements.

Thanks for the comments Paco.

Mike
Nice unit, light in comparison to a steel one with the same design. Aluminum billet is strong as hell. Reminds me of our Amkus spreaders (jaws of life) we use . Stout billet construction, still heavy but light compared to steel. My welding tables also incorporate 2” receivers for the same reason you mentioned.
Lastly, what model is the bead roller?
Thanks Mike
 

zmotorsports

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Nice unit, light in comparison to a steel one with the same design. Aluminum billet is strong as hell. Reminds me of our Amkus spreaders (jaws of life) we use . Stout billet construction, still heavy but light compared to steel. My welding tables also incorporate 2” receivers for the same reason you mentioned.
Lastly, what model is the bead roller?
Thanks Mike
Paco, the model I have is the model 202-24. Here is a link:
https://www.mittlerbros.com/24-adjustable-shaft-bead-roller.html

Things I really like about it compared to my buddies Pexto are the 24" deep throat. This makes turning much easier and allows the ability to put steps or bead much further into a panel. Secondly the fact that both wheels are driven which almost completely eliminates skid marks or drag marks on the surface.

Mike
 

zmotorsports

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very very nice Mike, really clean and neat.
wont let me place a like
Nice, Mike. The server isn't allowing likes at this time.
Absolutely beautiful job on the panels. How did you keep the lines so straight and the turns so uniform? <Like>
WOW! Thanks for all of the kind words and comments guys, I'm flattered. I'm pretty happy with the way they turned out and last night was the first night walking into the shop without seeing the items in the openings and it actually "felt" finished.

As for the lines, I merely marked then with a straight edge 4 inches in from the outside and then used a 3" diameter piece of tube to draw in the radius. Once I got the panel in the roller the key is to keep moving and especially don't stop on the turns, you want the turn to be smooth and fluid as you turn the panel while the rollers are drawing the panel through them. I actually filmed part of the panel stepping process in one of my videos for my youtube channel to show the process but I haven't edited or posted it yet.

Mike
 

zmotorsports

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A shop can never really be "finished" can it?
Especially with so much empty space in there!

-brino
Correct Brino. It is an evolution with no ending. It is the projects that get finished. :encourage:
You're both correct, that they are never really done. My last shop I was in for around 25 years and it went through several renditions in that timeframe.

I was more trying to express that when walking in now and not seeing the open compartments it has the "feeling" of being finished for the first time since I have moved into it about 4 months ago.

I am sure this one will go through variations over the years as well but I also hope I thought enough ahead to have power outlets that won't have to be moved, unlike my last shop.

Mike
 

RandyM

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You're both correct, that they are never really done. My last shop I was in for around 25 years and it went through several renditions in that timeframe.

I was more trying to express that when walking in now and not seeing the open compartments it has the "feeling" of being finished for the first time since I have moved into it about 4 months ago.

I am sure this one will go through variations over the years as well but I also hope I thought enough ahead to have power outlets that won't have to be moved, unlike my last shop.

Mike
Mikey,
There are certain things that will tend to find more permanent homes. But, never say never. Hope your power outlet location calculation is a good one. I planned on the other scenario when I started my shop 25 years ago. I assumed that my power requirements were going to change. I also realized I am building a shop and not the den in my house, so I put all of my electrical in conduit on the outside of the walls. A half a dozen changes have proven I made the correct decision. I also have visions of more wiring changes in the future. I have never regretted my choice. Besides, when someone does come into my shop for the first time, the electrical isn't even noticed. Some of my friends have inquired and my response is, "I go to my shop to work on projects and play, not to look at the walls". I admit buried wiring is nice, but not for a shop. Oh you have a work den that anyone can and should be proud of. I know how you feel when you walk through that door every time. It never gets old. :encourage:
 

zmotorsports

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Mikey,
There are certain things that will tend to find more permanent homes. But, never say never. Hope your power outlet location calculation is a good one. I planned on the other scenario when I started my shop 25 years ago. I assumed that my power requirements were going to change. I also realized I am building a shop and not the den in my house, so I put all of my electrical in conduit on the outside of the walls. A half a dozen changes have proven I made the correct decision. I also have visions of more wiring changes in the future. I have never regretted my choice. Besides, when someone does come into my shop for the first time, the electrical isn't even noticed. Some of my friends have inquired and my response is, "I go to my shop to work on projects and play, not to look at the walls". I admit buried wiring is nice, but not for a shop. Oh you have a work den that anyone can and should be proud of. I know how you feel when you walk through that door every time. It never gets old. :encourage:
I seriously considered doing all surface mounted electrical like we have in our maintenance shop at work when I was in the planning phase (like the last several years) but in the end I couldn't bring myself to do it. It seems like more crap collects on the conduit than I care for. I like my clean walls but I did run extra wiring overhead for future drops if needs be. Also as far as power I had a 200-amp panel and MORE than enough electrical than 5 guys in a shop could utilize let alone one. My contractor kept telling me I was crazy putting in as much electrical as I was but I basically told him I was calling the shots and not him. Worked out well but I did have to end up doing much of the electrical myself as sweat equity as my GC still didn't calculate in as much electrical as I instructed him originally. In the end will never run out of power, that is one thing I can be certain of.

You are also correct, that walking into a shop that you are proud of never gets old. I thought my last shop was nice and I was very proud of that one, but this one is on a whole different level.

Thanks again Randy.

Mike
 

MontanaAardvark

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Well, my project was much smaller than that. I made a set of soft jaws for my lathe. A version of this project I found linked on Pinterest.

SoftJaws-LMS.JPG

It's a Little Machine Shop 3540, a version of the Sieg SC4. I ended up needing almost everything in my shop. I cut the slices on my Sherline micro mill because it's the only thing I have a slitting saw for. Faced and thicknessed on this lathe, and then drilled and tapped on my G0704, because it's my best precision drill press.
 

EmilioG

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doing some more work on the lapping plate, got the feet milled into it, and after machining I checked for distortion and it seemed to have stayed the same, as you can tell by the bluing, during cutting the cross-hatch my cutter broke, so I made note of what line the program was at and when I get the replacement I will finish it out, I don't think I will scrape that surface, as the squares are pretty small, bout 1/4x1/4
View attachment 120555 View attachment 120556 View attachment 120557 View attachment 120558
What type of metal did you use and is it hardened? Looks great. Do you mind sharing the dimensions and other details? I have one of these on my project wish lists.
 

woodchucker

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You are also correct, that walking into a shop that you are proud of never gets old. I thought my last shop was nice and I was very proud of that one, but this one is on a whole different level.

Thanks again Randy.

Mike
Mike, I'm drooling. What are the black tops on the benches ? Granite, Soapstone, just plastic laminate?
 

kvt

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Yea, If that is what drives the compressor, what size if it. The Exhaust for that motor looks like about a 4 inch, and the muffler looks about as big as him. That compressor must need to generate one heck of a lot in a hurry.
 

RIMSPOKE

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I AM PLAYING WITH WIRES . NOT MY FAVORITE JOB , BUT IT MUST BE DONE .

THE WIRING HARNESS I HAVE FOR MY TG-500 IS ACTUALLY A KR-200 HARNESS
THAT I AM MODIFYING TO WORK IN THE 4 WHEELER .

I NEED TO RUN EXTRA WIRES TO THE REAR FOR THE THREE ADITIONAL GAUGES .
I ALSO NEED TO RUN ADITIONAL GROUND WIRES FOR ALL THE GAUGES & LIGHTS
BECAUSE OF THE FIBERGLASS BODY PANELS .

EVERY ONE OF THE WIRES IS BEING SORTED & NUMBERED .
THEN I WILL MAKE UP A WIRING SCHEMATIC .

WHEN I HAVE IT ALL IN PLACE AND WORKING , IT WILL BE WRAPPED WITH HEAT SHRINK
AND CLOTH ELECTRICAL TAPE . THIS WILL TAKE AWHILE .

DSC_0844.JPG DSC_0845.JPG DSC_0846.JPG DSC_0781.JPG
 
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