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Set Screw For Tool Holder

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Kroll

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#1
Guys I am missing some set screws for some of my tool holders and some are most of them are just cheap screws.What can I get that won't crack or maybe not rust that is of good quality?I look over at McMaster-Carr and there is several to pick from,but what is a good material?Thanks---kroll
 

kvt

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#4

4gsr

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#5
Most of the Asian made tool holders for the Aloris style tool post are made with sloppy screw holes for the metric socket set screws supplied. And some of it is the set screws themselves. I have replaced most of mine with socket head cap screws that have been modified a little. You have to turn the head down a little so you get side clearance for the screws when installed and I've faced them off to get the ends flat. So far they are doing fine. So much easier to tighten down without having to worry about rounding the hex out on the screws, too.
 

Tony Wells

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#9
I have split out a few sockets on the standard set screws they furnish, and decided that the length can be important. If they are long enough to stand up and allow the hex recess to be unsupported by the internal threads in the tool holder, they can be broken. The proper length should put the hex recess slightly below the top surface of the holder. I've never broken out one selected to suit that requirement. Once you break out the hex socket, it's time for vise-grips or a pipe wrench......both time consuming and aggravating. Naturally, you may need to keep a couple of different lengths on hand to cover all the different stackup heights of whatever tool you put in, but it's worth it. Now maybe I am being a gorilla when tightening my screws, but whatever. I put them in by hand, and remove them with a cheater, just to minimize that snap when they break loose.
 

Kroll

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#10
Thanks guys for all the suggestions and thoughts.What Tony discribe is what has happen to me,I never gave that any thought.Ordering my 3/4 length setscrews which is perfect for my tooling.I do also like those square head screws so going to order one box just to check it out and see if I can still adjust the height of the holder.
 

intjonmiller

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#11
I just replaced all of mine with 5/8" length 5/16"-18 stainless 18-8 set screws. I got a pack of 25 on eBay for something like $8 with free shipping. I forget the name of the manufacturer, but they were purchased a while back by Dorman, and it's a U.S. company, though made in China like everything else. I had trouble finding any that were made in America for less than $1 each (including shipping).
 

Wreck™Wreck

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#12
I just replaced all of mine with 5/8" length 5/16"-18 stainless 18-8 set screws. I got a pack of 25 on eBay for something like $8 with free shipping. I forget the name of the manufacturer, but they were purchased a while back by Dorman, and it's a U.S. company, though made in China like everything else. I had trouble finding any that were made in America for less than $1 each (including shipping).
I would not use stainless set screws or fasteners in any application unless required, these will not last long at all with constant use. Stainless is a rather weak alloy of steel and lacks toughness above all, most SS alloys used for fasteners can not be made very hard. Use stainless if required by the FDA/customer, for appearance or if corrosion resistance is paramount otherwise do not use stainless fasteners at all.
 

Bob Korves

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#13
When you have set screws or other fasteners that are tightened and loosened regularly, don't settle for anything less than the best:
http://www.holo-krome.com/index.html
Lots of suppliers have them, and they are noticeably better than other fasteners as soon as you look closely at one up close. A few uses and you will also be a believer. And they are not noticeably expensive.
 

Bamban

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#15
I have some ChiCom AXA tool holders coming, which of these quoted screws are the correct ones.



You're kinda vague, but if you are talking about setscrews for the QCTP tool holders for the lathe, these are what I use in the imported AXA size:

Nonmarring Flat Point Socket Set Screw
Alloy Steel, M8 Size, 20mm Length, 1.25mm Pitch


http://www.mcmaster.com/mv1466081869/#93245a145/=130chp6
I just replaced all of mine with 5/8" length 5/16"-18 stainless 18-8 set screws. I got a pack of 25 on eBay for something like $8 with free shipping. I forget the name of the manufacturer, but they were purchased a while back by Dorman, and it's a U.S. company, though made in China like everything else. I had trouble finding any that were made in America for less than $1 each (including shipping).
 

chips&more

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#16
I’m with the folks above that said no stainless and make sure the set screw is nested below the top of the threaded hole. And I have gotten decent alloy steel set screws from Enco…Dave.
 

Bamban

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#18
"Nonmarring Flat Point Socket Set Screw
Alloy Steel, M8 Size, 20mm Length, 1.25mm Pitch"

"I just replaced all of mine with 5/8" length 5/16"-18 stainless 18-8 set screws."


I am curious as which of these tool holders use M8 x 1.25 and which ones use 5/16 x 18
 

dulltool17

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#19
I'll cast my lot with the gentleman from Sacramento, Mr. Korves. Holo-chrome is top-notch and only pennies more than cheap hardware. Run-of-the-mill cap screws are OK in a pinch, but we put money into our tools for good reason.
 

Tony Wells

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#20
If I'm not mistaken, H-K and Unbrako merged and are still about the best there is. Unbrako was already probably the number one competitor for H-K, so they just bought them out. I spent a little time in the wholesale/industrial fastener market, and have seen many, many tests first hand and H-K has always come out on top. Best import used to be Brighton-Best, but can't say for sure. It's been a few years and like a few things, imports have improved in order to keep market share.
 

intjonmiller

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#21
"Nonmarring Flat Point Socket Set Screw
Alloy Steel, M8 Size, 20mm Length, 1.25mm Pitch"

"I just replaced all of mine with 5/8" length 5/16"-18 stainless 18-8 set screws."


I am curious as which of these tool holders use M8 x 1.25 and which ones use 5/16 x 18
The two are pretty close if my mental math is correct. But mine (the 5/16-18) are for a four-way toolpost of unknown origin on an old Logan lathe. I would not expect the import toolposts, quick change or otherwise, to have fractional set screws, but I've never owned one.

My brother fixed the A/C in my wife's Sequoia today. In the process two bolts on the evaporator broke so he sent me to a bolt supply house down the street. I'd never been there but I'm glad I did. I got a dozen new black oxide set screws and the replacement bolts and they just asked for $2. I gave them $3 and still felt like I was taking advantage after all the prices I had seen online.
 

4gsr

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#22
"Nonmarring Flat Point Socket Set Screw
Alloy Steel, M8 Size, 20mm Length, 1.25mm Pitch"

"I just replaced all of mine with 5/8" length 5/16"-18 stainless 18-8 set screws."
As sloppy as the threads are, you can get 5/16-18 set screws to go into the holes and probably work fine. But technically, there is a slight difference between a M8 x 1.25 and 5/16-18 UNC threads.

EDIT: I don't recommend mixing thread pitches like this combination. It could cause long term problems that maybe harmful to your health.... Using words you don't normally use.
 
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Bamban

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#23
4gsr,

Thank you. I just want to order the correct replacement screws for the ChiCom oversized AXA tool holders I have coming from All Industrial. M8 x 1.25 it is.

nez
 

Wreck™Wreck

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#24
I have some ChiCom AXA tool holders coming, which of these quoted screws are the correct ones.
There is no "correct", there are only choices that last longer then others and on occasion perform better.
A more useful question would be "What works well in this application"?
 

Bamban

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#25
There is no "correct", there are only choices that last longer then others and on occasion perform better.
A more useful question would be "What works well in this application"?
OK, I'll bite. What works well in this application, holding the cutting tools?
 

4gsr

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#27
Socket set screws with a flat point are sometimes difficult to find. It is very easy to set up and face off set screws to remove the cup point they come with. Yeah, they are a little tough to cut, but with a good carbide tool, it's no sweat to make it happen. That's how I did the one's I use on my holders.
 

TakeDeadAim

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#28
I strongly advise against stainless set screws. Unless they are hardened the sockets will wear and round out much easier than a good quality alloy steel screw. This is an area, any screw used for holding, that needs adjusting or frequently gets tightened a lot, like on a tool post, needs to be high quality alloy steel. I also put just a dot of copper base anti seize on them every once in a while. When they start to feel lose on the wrench I replace them. The wrenches you use are important as well. Quality wrenches that fit well are worth the extra money. If you use a lot of tools like I do its worth it to accumulate a bunch of tool holders and keep the frequently used tool holders mounted in them. I am selective with the tool holders I buy to minimize the number of holders I need but it really saves time to be able to pull the drawer open and grab the tool you need all adjusted and ready. While Im at it the nuts that come on the import toolholders sometimes need replacement as well.
 

EmilioG

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#29
BoltDepot.com is a good source if you need standard fasteners. They can be purchased one or 100.
McMasters has very good selection., and like someone posted above, you can cut them to size. I did this recently.
I use SS fasteners all the time for certain applications and have had no problems. I also use a good metal free Molykote
anti seize lubricant for threads from Dow Corning. Never had a problem, even with auto exhaust bolts.
H-K doesn't seem to make short fasteners, at least not in set screws.
 

Bob Korves

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#30
(snip)I also use a good metal free Molykote
anti seize lubricant for threads from Dow Corning.(snip)
I thought "whoa", Moly in Molykote stands for Molybdenum. But I chased it down, and sure enough, metal free Molykote, Emilio. Sort of like gelatin free Jello... Anyway, thanks for the tip, though I really don't know why I need it compared to the other products I already have.
 
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