1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. We want to wish everyone a healthy, happy New Year, full of joy and success. God bless you, and thank you for supporting The Hobby-Machinist.

    Dismiss Notice

[How do I?] Setting A Huan Yang Inverter Vfd

Discussion in 'ELECTRICAL ISSUES - POWER YOUR MACHINES & SHOP' started by randyjaco, Jul 14, 2016.

  1. randyjaco

    randyjaco Reserved Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    117
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Friendswood
    State:
    Texas
    I just purchased a 7.5 kw Huanyang Inverter VFD cheap off EBay. The manual is terrible but the VFD is running the motor, so at least it works. I have been in contact with the seller but there is a language problem, but he's trying. He just informed me that the VFD is factory set at 50hz and that I need to reset it to 60hz. I can’t find anything in the manual about setting the input frequency. Does anyone know how to make this change?

    Thanks
    Randy
     
  2. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    990
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Tucson
    State:
    Arizona
    I would look at the previous threads on this subject, the first is the settings, the second has the manuals. It sometimes helps to give the model number or type as there are various models/series. The manual language issue is a common problem, and they often overstate their ratings. Another issue is the terminals take very small spades for the rated current. Make sure the motor settings are also correct.
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/huanyang-vfd-wiring-setup-vfd-newbie.34107/#post-408335
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/huanyang-vfd-basic-input-wiring.46329/
     
  3. cathead

    cathead Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    343
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Bemidji
    State:
    Minnesota
    A few months ago I set one up for a friend and changed the cycles from 50 to 60. I don't have the booklet
    but do remember making the change. The manual is written in what some call "chinglish" thus making
    adjustments somewhat challenging. If you need me to read in my friend's manual and relay the information,
    I would be glad to do so but it might take a couple days to accomplish. Maybe others will be able to help you
    sooner.
     
  4. randyjaco

    randyjaco Reserved Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    117
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Friendswood
    State:
    Texas
    OK, thanks for the replies. From reading old posts I think I am beginning to understand.
    The VFD is a model GT-7R5G-2
    The motor is @50 year old 5hp 220 three phase
    3600 rpm
    Type Y
    Frame 660
    Style 163xp
    Rise 50
    60 cycle

    For programming I have figured out the obvious. But now, how do I determine how many poles the motor has?

    TIA
    Randy
     
  5. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    990
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Tucson
    State:
    Arizona
    Synchronous speed for 3 phase motors at 60 Hz would be:
    3600 RPM for 2 pole
    1800 RPM for 4 pole
    1200 RPM for 6 pole
    900 RPM for 8 pole
    So you would have a 2 pole motor. Given the age of the motor, I would not go beyond the base speed of 60Hz, match to VFD voltage to the motor, and not get to aggressive on the VFD PWM frequency to minimize insulation damage,
    mark
     
  6. randyjaco

    randyjaco Reserved Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    117
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Friendswood
    State:
    Texas
    Thanks Mark, I would have gotten the poles wrong.
    Now, one more question : What P code (or whatever you call it) do you use to indicate the 60hz input voltage?
    Randy
     
  7. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    990
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Tucson
    State:
    Arizona
  8. randyjaco

    randyjaco Reserved Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    117
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Friendswood
    State:
    Texas
    Thanks again Mark. Wow, is this starting to get complex. My Teco's were much more simple. All I am planning to do is turn the 3 phase motor on and off. Are there any other esoteric electronic /programming tid bits I need to be aware of?

    Randy
     
  9. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    990
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Tucson
    State:
    Arizona
    Agree that there are a lot of program variables, but it allows better control and adaptability to a wider range of applications and motors. It is a bit daunting up front, but after you have programmed a few of these it starts to make sense. Biggest problem is the manuals are so poorly written and information is fragmented through the manual. The newer inexpensive Teco's may not work as well as some of the older ones, and some of the lack of features gives poorer motor control.

    The only other commands that may need to be changed would be for remote functions (Terminal Control Mode) for For/Rev, speed, or programming other inputs (P5.01-P5.07) , etc. and what you want the VFD to do control wise. I usually Auto-Tune the motor which measure winding parameters (P2.06-P2.10) of the motors and stores them in the VFD memory. PO.16 usually set to 1 autotuning with rotation, this must be done with the motor not mechanically connected to the drive system, otherwise use 2 static autotuning. This is done once and then reset this parameter to 0.
    Mark
     
  10. rnmerritt

    rnmerritt United States Swarf Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    City:
    Fort Bragg
    State:
    California
    I have the same vfd
    And the book is awful. Do you know how to get to the parameters to set up the speed pot on the keypad.???
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  11. johnnyc14

    johnnyc14 Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    380
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    St.Albert
    State:
    Alberta
    I installed a Hyanyang VFD on my newly acquired Bridgeport clone mill and I am happy with the results. I have it set up with a remote panel with switches for run, forward/reverse and jog as well as a variable speed potentiometer. I removed the old electrical box from the side of the mill and gutted all the old electrical stuff out of it. I mounted the box on an adjustable pedestal with the vfd and switch panel inside so it can be reached easily. After I got all the settings right I wrote a up a document and drew a schematic in case anyone else wants this information. The switch panel in the picture is temporary. I plan to make something prettier later, I just wanted to get it up and running fast for now.

    P2210791_zpsllxnbgpr.jpg

    P2210790_zps2mgdnjri.jpg


    Huanyang Inverter (VFD)


    -Model number HY03D023B

    -Input 240 Volt single phase

    -Rated output 220 Volt 3 phase 4 HP or 3KW 13 Amps (220 volts X 13 Amps = 2860 watts) (1 HP = 746 Watts) (4 X 746 Watts = 2984 Watts)


    Initial Set-Up


    -Instructions from vendor (eBay seller “Solar Jean”) suggested the frequency parameters be set in the following order: PD05 set to 60HZ, PD04 set to 60HZ, PD03 set to 60HZ, PD72 to 60HZ. I connected the 240 Volt single phase input power to terminals S and T and the 3 legs of the 3 phase 3 HP motor to terminals U, V, and W. I plugged the VFD in with it temporarily just lying of the table of the mill and it powered up. I set the above parameters as suggested and the Run, Forward and Reverse functions worked from the unit’s built in keypad.


    Advanced Set-Up


    -I wanted to use a remote mounted control panel to allow remote function of Run, Forward/Reverse, Jog as well as a Potentiometer controlled variable speed. Since the mill has a variable speed head I see no reason to run the motor at more than the rated 60HZ. Using the supplied manual I then made the following switching, wiring and parameter changes to achieve the functions I wanted. I used the schematic on page 37 as a guide for the 3 wire Run, Forward/Reverse switches and the schematic on page 12 for the wiring of the Potentiometer. Page 36 explains how the output terminals can be re-configured for multiple uses. I drew the following schematic after researching the manual. The information on pages 19-26 of the manual details which parameters and settings support the different functions. Since my custom settings are all basic they are all covered on pages 19-20 except PD72 which was part of the initial setup for 60HZ power. These are the connections and parameter changes I made to make the VFD function as I wanted:


    See the schematic on the next page, Switch 1 is for D1, Switch 2 is for D2 and Switch 3 is for D3.

    -PD01 set to 1 to support use of external input controls.

    -PD44 set to 1 to change the function of the “FOR” terminal to D1. When set to 1, D1 is now the Run function.

    -PD45 set to 5 to change the function of the “REV” terminal to D2. When set to 5, D2 is now the Forward/Reverse selector. When Switch 2 is open you get forward rotation and when closed you get reverse. See page 37 of the manual for these instructions.

    -PD46 set to 6 to change the function of the “RST” terminal to D3. When set to 6, D3 is now the Jog function. It works in forward or reverse depending on the position of switch 2.

    -PD02 set to 1 to support the input from the external Potentiometer for speed control.

    -PD11 set to 10. This sets the lowest frequency of the variable speed to 10HZ so the potentiometer can adjust the speed of the motor from 10HZ to 60HZ. The factory setting is 0 so when the pot is turned all the way down the motor stops.

    -PD14 set to 5 to change the acceleration time (0Hz to 60HZ) to 5 seconds when run is selected. Factory setting is 20 seconds.

    -PD15 set to 5 to change ramp down or deceleration time (60HZ to 0HZ) to 5 seconds. I was cautioned to go no lower than 5 seconds without connecting an external braking resistor. The VFD must be given time to dissipate the energy created by the motor as it slows (it acts as a generator when slowing). The internal braking circuits in the VFD cannot support aggressive deceleration and an external braking resistor must be added to slow to a stop quickly. Using the information in the manual, and some internet searches I settled on a 200 ohm, 200 watt resistor. I have ordered but not received it yet so the one show in the schematic is not wired in currently. I will update this information when I get the resistor and experiment with aggressive slow down times.


    VFD%20Schematic_zps8fn7xg1w.png


    John
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.

Share This Page