1. 75Plus

    75Plus Active Members Active Member

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    Here is a very ordinary hump back clock that I picked up. There was no makers identification on the movement and the dial was recovered.

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    Here is the movement as found. You can see why no one would want to claim it!!

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    This is the back plate after a session at the drill press with a little valve grinding compound and a leather lap.

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    Makes a difference doesn't it?

    Joe
     
  2. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Active Members Supporter Active Member

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    Hey, Joe. The only problem now is that you'll have to put it on the mantle backwards with the door open. :biggrin:

    Looks great.
     
  3. Bryan Smith

    Bryan Smith New Member

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    You took what looked like a German mov't and made it look like an English Smith's brand clock. Nice job. I've done similar with a wooden dowel in a drill press and a sand and oil slurry on my motorized bicycle clutch cover. Your spacing is superb to mine and the valve compound is preferred.


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    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  4. churchjw

    churchjw Active Members Supporter Active Member

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    Great job. I keep wanting to try this on something but never have.

    Jeff
     
  5. 8ntsane

    8ntsane Active Members Active Member

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    Joe
    You have done a fine looking job on that clock. Looks great (':thumbzup:')
     
  6. 75Plus

    75Plus Active Members Active Member

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    And in gunsmithing it is called jeweling as in "Jeweled Bolt"

    Mark, I did this before I got my mill. I used the set-up described by Steve Conover in his "How to repair Herschede Tubular Bell Clocks". The instructions run 6 pages and requires making fixtures to control the spacing. The same job can be done on a mill, in much less time and with greater accuracy.

    Joe
     
  7. Bryan Smith

    Bryan Smith New Member

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    Jerry, it's a Grubee Starfire GenII 50cc bicycle engine from China. These types of engines are copies of Older Russian bicycle engines from the 1940s and 50s. Similar kits are available on Ebay.
     
  8. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    One of the better fabricators I have had the pleasure to work with had the jeweling down pretty well. He did it on nearly all the aluminum jobs we did. He did it a little larger, because of the scale of the pieces, and basically freehand, using only a single straightedge and a 4" grinder with a flapwheel. He tried to teach a couple of the younger hands, but I don't think any of them ever got it. The only time I've ever done it was smaller, and I used a dowel and valve grinding compound in a mill.

    I have a couple of tools I wouldn't mind going over.
     

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