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Welding Safety

jpfabricator

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#2
Welding hoods ate sooooo over-rated! How do you think they keep those nice tans! :confused:

Sent from somewhere in East Texas Jake Parker
 

roadie33

Active User
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#4
I believe the Lens is built into the gun.
It doesn't have to be that big to shield the arc that way.
 

Cheeseking

Active User
Active Member
#6
I believe the Lens is built into the gun.
It doesn't have to be that big to shield the arc that way.
Ha. Does it protect the other guy across the table?[emoji38]
I have to admit tho on occasion I will grab my tig torch and don only the calf skin gloves and a 4" pc of filter glass in other hand just to make a small (fusion) weld or two. Of course its just me and myself in the basement. Come to think of it my hands and arms got s few liver spots going on
 

planeflyer21

Active Member
Active Member
#8
I believe it is in those fancy safety glasses. On youtube, one of Dan Gelbert's videos he starts welding with only his eye glasses on after stating something like "The radiation that damages your eyes are the UV rays and these glasses are 100% UVA and UVB blocking."

Shocked me.
 

TommyD

Active Member
Active Member
#9
If I look at anything bright for even a glance, when I look away all I can see is a big, blue dot. Don't think I'd take a chance without a welding bucket. Besides, my burning beard smells awful when I get some sparks in it.
 

British Steel

Active User
Active Member
#10
If I look at anything bright for even a glance, when I look away all I can see is a big, blue dot. Don't think I'd take a chance without a welding bucket. Besides, my burning beard smells awful when I get some sparks in it.
I get the same problem with pissistence of vision - and if you think burning beard smells bad, try a few sparks "tidying" your nasal hairs...

Dave H. (the other one)
 

British Steel

Active User
Active Member
#11
On another note re welding safety, I really hope EVERYONE knows that chlorinated solvents (e.g. brake cleaner) and welding arcs is a LETHAL cocktail, even the UV radiated (never mind the spark and red/white heat) creates phosgene, a nasty war gas that almost took my grandpa - if you get even a whiff of new-mown grass while welding you probably need immediate medical attention :(

Dave H. (the other one)
 

stupoty

Active User
Active Member
#13
I believe it is in those fancy safety glasses. On youtube, one of Dan Gelbert's videos he starts welding with only his eye glasses on after stating something like "The radiation that damages your eyes are the UV rays and these glasses are 100% UVA and UVB blocking."

Shocked me.
Thats quite shocking, he dosn't normaly come accross as a total idiot ;)

I had my hood on grind mode (stupidly) and i struck an arc, the yellow dots disapeared after about 5 minuits so yes the shade 4 and 100% uv block will stop you going blind from igniting an arc but safty glasses only?? Hummm.

I have some funny pics of welds that i think were mig welded by some idiot using the look away method, sorta wanted to say , "do you think thats why you missed all your welds?"

Stuart
 

Steve Shannon

Rocketgeek
H-M Supporter-Premium
#14
I was shopping at Enco today and I was surprised to find safety glasses from uvex, I believe, that were for welding. I suspect they were just for accidental flash protection. I'm with you; I want more protection.


[emoji1010] Steve Shannon, P.E. [emoji1010]
 
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tweinke

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#20
Real men cook bacon naked, from the looks of the picture welding should be done that way too, guess I'm not a real man.
 

savarin

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#25
I saw a good one in the Philippines once. (only 6 years ago)
Bamboo scaffolding tied up with string ending up with one tall vertical pole. Four floor high.
The welder was hanging off the pole with one hand whilst he welded something I couldn't see.
All the while the pole flexed back and forth. I had no camera with me that day unfortunately.
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#26
Until I got my auto darkening helmet I had several corneal arc ray burns (AKA photokeratitis). Not serious but spending 12+ hours in a darkened room will make you think twice. How many here have done it?
R
 

dlane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#27
I've had cucumber slices on my eyes before, takes the grind out, that was a long time ago.
Don't do that no, mo.
 

TommyD

Active Member
Active Member
#28
Doing some welding the other day and must have hit the darkening switch on my welding bucket when I flipped it up. Got all set to strike another arc, nodded my head to lower the bucket and struck the arc. Normally I have issues finding the seam,my glasses aren't quite in the right position but this time everything was crystal clear, until I figgered out the lense didn't darken:confused:. Luckily the glass was just dark enough and I realized what was going on before too long.

Another time I was welding in a shop I worked at, I lifted the bucket to notice the guys looking at me and laughing. Somehow a spark shot out a few feet off to the side of me, catching a 5 gallon bucket of garbage on fire.
 

roadie33

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#29
And everyone just stood there watching while it burned.
That is so typical.
And we wonder why no one will help themselves or another person in need. :concerned:
 

astjp2

Active User
Active Member
#30
We had someone write up as a safety near miss an orange peel on the floor in an office area, they picked it up but wrote it up, I would have been embarrassed to call it a safety problem let alone mention that I picked it up.