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What The Heck Does This Mean?

kingmt01

Active Member
Active Member
#1
Well this isn't a milling machine, lathe, or even a common shop tool. However I do use them outside the kitchen at times for spacial projects & I bet someone here can answer it.

So the listing on a small blinder says "400 power watts/250 blending watts". What exactly is the difference? Makes it sound to me like the motor isn't power efficient. I know what a Watt of power is but not blending watts.
 

doogledee

Active Member
Active Member
#2
I would guess 400 watts is the max power the motor can handle, and 250w is the max power the blender will draw during use. Possibly there is a limitation in the drivetrain between the motor and the blender blades that can not take more than 250w.
How the system regulates this, I dont know.

Just a suggestion, I am sure someone who knows this for sure will soon chime in.


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mksj

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#4
The efficiency of most single phase motors is probably around 60%, so the load at the wall socket would be 400W, the motor produces 250W of power (assuming this is peak). You see all kinds of funny stuff with Hp and watts to make it sound that it is bigger and badder than the competition. Like 5Hp (peak Hp) shop vacuum cleaners that you plug into a 15A wall socket.
 

David S

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#6
King to try and sort this out can you give us the nameplate information, assuming it is UL listed.

David
 

kingmt01

Active Member
Active Member
#7
Sorry but no David. I was reading a listing for it on Rural Kings web site. It's a blinder I was considering getting to have for those odd projects since my wife claimed my last one as hers now.
 

Keith Foor

Active Member
Active Member
#10
It's probably similar to the nonsense that they pull with the rating of many electric motors on things like vacuum cleaners.
They will take the current draw of the motor with the rotor locked and then do a current and voltage calculation to come up with a wattage number and then convert it into watts and from there horsepower. That's how you get a 6.5 HP rated shop vac. So my guess is that the 400 number is the rotor locked number, and the 250 is the actual operating peak when you are grinding ice or mixing concrete with it. All those numbers are so inflated that it's not funny. But consider what a 6.5 HP shop vac would require to run. First it would need to be 220, and it would need to be on a 50 amp circuit with a number 6 wire cord and a Twist Lock or welder plug. But that don't stop them from rating them that way.

Lawn implement engines are rated that same way. What use to be a 3.5 HP motor is now a 6 or 7 HP motor. No change in displacement, no change in fuel consumption (which would have had to double). They quit rating them at the torque times RPM at the operating RPM (typically 3600) and take the peak torque and the maximum no load RPM and multiple them giving them the number they use as the HP rating on the motor.
 

tq60

Active Member
Active Member
#11
400 watts and 250 watts are close and small numbers.

Guessing total power of 400 is electric power gross into cord.

Blending power likely net power available from the blade into the materisl.

Look at vita mix planners that create hot soup demonstrated at Costco.

That heat is from friction caused by powee moving blades...that power must be the blending power maybe?

Like washing power for presure washers where they multiply water volume by water pressure to create a universal number to compare them.


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Reeltor

Active User
Active Member
#13
Might be the power actually applied to the blades.
I think jim is right on this. 250 is the power applied at the blades after losses due to gearing etc.

If you want to go crazy try to compare KitchenAid mixers, seems like every retailer has a mixer made to their own specs.