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10ee VFD Conversion

deek

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Oct 30, 2014
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Hi All,

I wasn't going to post my conversion, but my buddy talked me into it saying he thought it might help others facing the same issues.

Here's my story...

I've been wanting a 10ee for some time. Out here on the west coast they are few and far between. I haunted auctions, used equipment dealers, and, naturally CL. I finally found one pretty close that didn't appear to be completely trashed and was a reasonable price. I bought from a really nice machinist in Oakland whose shop could have been a museum of classic lathes. He bought 3 10ee's at auction keeping one and selling the other two.

I got the beast home with no issues. Many thanks to Screwy Tuesday guy Chuck B for suggesting a hydraulic drop trailer. That made the move incredibly easy.

Once home, the fun began. I have single phase 220 to the shop, so I thought about what I should do. The 10ee is a 58 Wiad, so I could have run the lathe on single phase. It had been demo'd on 3ph 440, so I knew everything worked. I read all the opinions and finally decided to pull the Wiad and go with a VFD. There are a lot of good reasons to go either way - repair and use or replace with modern electronics. What turned it for me was that after reading all the materials on the Wiad several times, I still just couldn't get a handle on it. My brain just doesn't accept the magic of electronics as real. I really wanted to want to go with the DC stuff, but, in the end, I just didn't.

First pic is the machine in its original position.
10EE-03.jpg

First job was removing the motor and electronics.
IMG_0669.JPG

So these things are super heavy. I could barely pull the motor out onto a piece of plywood. There after I used an engine hoist to move things around. The electronics are also heavy. There's a handle that you use to pull them out of the drawer. The slides were damaged so it was no easy feat. Once I got it out of the compartment, I went to lift the assembly by the handle. Nope. Couldn't even budge it.

The motor and electronics found a good home to a guy who wanted to use them to repair his 10ee. We traded a steady rest and 4 jaw chuck for it. Really nice fella.

Next was to clean the motor compartment.

Before

: IMG_0667.JPG

After

IMG_0671.JPG

It was a dirty job, but my wife wouldn't do it.

I chose to use a 5hp with the back gear. Here's a couple of pics of the conversion
IMAG0177.jpg

IMAG0176.jpg

IMAG0179.jpg

IMG_0672.JPG

I decided to use a lovejoy connection and make the shaft adapter for the back gear. There are a pair of bearings and an oil seal on that shaft plate. I cut a key in the shaft and bored and broached the drive gear. The dogs on the shifter were worn, so I tig brazed them and then ground them to size. The key to this build, I believe, was thinking through the process and getting the order right to preserve alignment (although the lovejoy helps with any small discrepancies). I went this way because the motor required no modification, which will make a change out easier if needed in the future. I was a little nervous about boring the drive gear, but read that it was't hardened and had enough meat to take the 1 1/8 shaft with a key. Thanks to the guys who have previously shared their experiences. It's a pretty straightforward conversion, but takes some time. I think I put three long weekends into that part of the conversion.

I'm by no means a pro. I'm a hobbiest and pushing myself to learn more. My first lathe, a southbend 8k was an experience in tuning up a new machine. This was way more fun.

I mounted the motor on the original plate with spacers to clear the plate leveling screws.
IMG_0679.JPG

I had planned it so that the pulleys would sit 1" lower so as to accommodate standard belt sizes. That worked out just fine.

The back gear lever had enough adjustment to accommodate the 1" without further modification.

Next was the VFD. I used a Yaskawa V1000 rated for 5hp. I really thought about using one of the cheaper imports on ebay based on recommendations from many members from many different forums. In the end, I got the pricier VFD because the documentation was outstanding. I couldn't be happier with this VFD. It controls the motor quietly and the options for programming are endless. I've put in an external resistor and the stop switch will stop the motor in a fraction of a second. I put the controller in the middle compartment.

IMG_0680.JPG

I used 16ga wire for contact switches and shielded wire for the speed control. I used the original speed control knob with a new claristat pot. It took a while to figure out how to integrate it with the VFD. For the longest time I was fussing with the programming and pulling my hair out when I realized I had the legs of the pot wired incorrectly. I put the VFD on an angled plate so I can slide it out for service. I also put everything in water tight flexible conduit. I got that all buttoned up and added an emergency stop.

I decided not to use the 3phase coolant pump. Not sure what I'll do with it. I'm not crazy about using coolant too much. Again, I'm not really doing production, so I can go light cuts and take all day. lol.

I ordered the VFD with a remote because the thought of trying to run the lathe from the main control panel seemed impractical. I decided to make use of the end of the lathe. Granted, it's not easily seen, but the keypad easily comes out of the mount so I can use it if I need to. Mostly, I run the lathe from the speed knob and RPM meter.

IMAG0187.jpg

Now some of you will notice the 4x4 timbers the lathe is on. Those were attached to transport to make the whole thing more stable. When I got it home, I liked the height so much that I just left them on. I'll start a new post to show their replacement.

The conversion is not without frustration. I just kept chipping away at it until I got everything squared away. I was lucky to have a mill and lathe that were working so I could fab any part or fixture I needed. The speed control is excellent. The VFD can be programmed for constant torque, which is what I'm doing. I've taken some pretty aggressive cuts and haven't stalled the motor. The slow speed without cogging and without the back gear is about 300 rpm. With the back gear it's a fraction of that. I thought a long time about the 7.5 hp, but decided I just didn't need the power. Plus, the 5hp fits so nicely. I'd read stories about guys who had trouble getting everything inside the cabinet. I can run the lathe from the keypad, but I really like the original speed controls and switches. I did wire in the spindle lock cutout. It was a pain getting everything right, but pretty freakin' cool to be able to run the lathe as it was intended. I haven't figured out the back gear solenoid yet. I can't tell what voltage it's supposed to receive from the electrical diagrams... I think I said it was all magic. lol.

I can honestly say I'm very happy with the conversion. We'll see how it holds up over time.

Peace.
deek

10EE-03.jpg
 

Eddyde

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Oct 13, 2014
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Nice job, Thanks for sharing.
 

deek

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Oct 30, 2014
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Removing the Moving Timbers...

Ok, so I like the height of the timbers I used to transport the lathe, but they were rather clumsy and did not allow for proper leveling. I'm also tight on space and frequently need to move things around to accommodate different projects.

Here's my solution
IMG_0696.JPG

The reason I'm showing this pre-install picture is because I've put plates where the original leveling bolts go. The lathe is intended to rest on those three points, so I fabbed these up to make that happen.

Here they are installed

IMG_0698.JPG

IMG_0701.JPG

What I like about this is that the base is now wide enough that I'm not worried about it tipping over. The leveling feet raise the wheel just off the ground, so the machine is only on the wheels when moving. The leveling proceeds by leveling lengthwise, then crosswise. I made it so the lathe is approxmately the same height as it was when it was on the timbers. I'm 6'2" so a little height was a great relief.

I wanted to make something that was reminiscent of that era of industrialization, so I drilled the gussets to be a little more decorative without losing too much strength. You can see that detail in this picture.

IMG_0699.JPG

You may have noticed the tailstock. It was gummed up and rusty, so I took it apart, cleaned it, put new felt, and painted it up. Here's a closer shot.

IMAG0190.jpg

I'm using a product called Hammerite. It's pretty amazing. This is 5 coats of spray. It's pretty rugged and resists solvents well. It imparts a texture and color variation to the surface, which I think complements the cast parts. I'm not a huge fan of using a bunch of body filler to smooth everything out. First because I like the texture of the cast and second I just don't want to spend all that time getting the surface perfect. You guys who have done that have incredible looking lathes. But that's just not how I want to spend my limited time. Mostly, I'm looking to get a good paint on a clean surface to protect from rust as well as provide some good aesthetics. I do tear everything down completely to clean, repair, replace, and refurbish, but surface perfection is not my gig.

peace,
deek
 

Doubleeboy

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Dec 3, 2014
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Hopefully you saved the innerds of the WiaD so that another can live or be refurbished. As you most likely know WiaD parts are worth some $. I for one would be interested in your C16J tubes if they are good. PM if interested

Nice clean looking conversion
 

deek

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Oct 30, 2014
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The Wiad went to a really nice guy who needed the parts to repair his. I traded him a steady rest and 4 jaw chuck for that stuff. I was happy that stuff found a good home and that I got a nice chuck and steady rest for the 10ee.
 

Silverbullet

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May 4, 2015
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I like the paint job, the bronze shade suits machines just like the different grays. Even the different grays with blue mixed. I'm not keen on red or orange. But to each his own. Nice machine hope the conversion last as long as the original did.
 

Karl_T

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Oct 14, 2014
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IMPRESSIVE!!!!

Great job. Did you fabricate that adaptor from the motor to the back gear unit from scratch? That ewould be a huge job. all by itself.

You are going to LOVE the 10EE. There is no other lathe like it.

My only suggestion. Get a top end DRO, like a Acurite. Most lathes can use any old DRO, but this one will easily work to 2 tenths on diameter.
 

deek

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Oct 30, 2014
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Thanks. I bought the housing, but fabbed the adapter plate from 3/4 inch aluminum plate.

The lathe came with a newall dro that I'm pretty happy with. I'm shocked at how accurate the whole thing is and the finish on parts is really a joy.
 

T Bredehoft

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Dec 27, 2014
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I'm envious of your 10EE, I'll never have one, (too late in life, no need). I would, however do something about those red and black trip hazards. I'd be on the floor half the time running that lathe.
 

deek

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Oct 30, 2014
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I'm envious of your 10EE, I'll never have one, (too late in life, no need). I would, however do something about those red and black trip hazards. I'd be on the floor half the time running that lathe.

Actually, I got a couple of HD 5 gal buckets, cut out part of each and placed them over the wheels. Got a bright orange cover and a foot rest at the same time!
 
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