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14X54 American Pacemaker

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itsme_Bernie

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#31
I am stuck to this thread like glue.

Beautiful machine, and beautiful work. Wow. You are really saving a piece of American History.



Bernie
 

woodtickgreg

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#32
I'm with Bernie, I too am really enjoying your work on this grand old lathe. I enjoy every post!
 

rmack898

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#33
I'm glad you are enjoying this project because I'm about burnt out on it. I have done this type of work to quite a few other machines in my shop but it has never been at this pace. It took me 4 years to finish the Burke #4 mill and I think the fastest I have ever gone through a machine was 3 months for a DoAll band saw. I have a very lucrative job pending that requires this lathe and that is why I have been going full tilt on it, if I finish it this week it will have been about a 6 week job but I don't want to jinx myself.

I got some young guys from my day job to come over at lunch today and get the apron mounted on the carriage. It took 3 young guys and myself to get it up into place and bolted on to the carriage as the thing weighs about 250#s.

I got another batch of parts painted and got some more of the taper attachment mounted.

I really didn't want to get back into stripping paint and filler but the tailstock was just in way too bad of shape not to strip it down and do it right, I have way too much time and labor invested in this lathe to start cutting corners at the end of the job. I have applied one coat of stripper and I think that I can sand the rest rest of it to the point that I can start applying filler so the paint will look nice.

I go back to work tomorrow so the compound will go with me and get put in the parts washer. Once the tailstock and compound are done, that should be about it for the lathe. The only thing left to do will be to get the electric control box done and figure out how I'm going to run power to the lathe after I figure out where I'm gong to put the lathe. I have moved this lathe twice since I brought it home and once I figure out where to put it, I don't want to move it again until I move out of NJ.

#110.JPG #107.JPG #109.JPG #106.JPG #111.JPG #112.JPG
 

rmack898

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#34
I just went out to the shop to get a beverage out of the shop fridge and almost tripped on the lead screw and feed screw so I guess I am not as close to being done as I thought I was. See what happens when you work too fast.
 

drs23

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#35
I'm glad you are enjoying this project because I'm about burnt out on it. I have done this type of work to quite a few other machines in my shop but it has never been at this pace. It took me 4 years to finish the Burke #4 mill and I think the fastest I have ever gone through a machine was 3 months for a DoAll band saw. I have a very lucrative job pending that requires this lathe and that is why I have been going full tilt on it, if I finish it this week it will have been about a 6 week job but I don't want to jinx myself.

I got some young guys from my day job to come over at lunch today and get the apron mounted on the carriage. It took 3 young guys and myself to get it up into place and bolted on to the carriage as the thing weighs about 250#s.

I got another batch of parts painted and got some more of the taper attachment mounted.

I really didn't want to get back into stripping paint and filler but the tailstock was just in way too bad of shape not to strip it down and do it right, I have way too much time and labor invested in this lathe to start cutting corners at the end of the job. I have applied one coat of stripper and I think that I can sand the rest rest of it to the point that I can start applying filler so the paint will look nice.

I go back to work tomorrow so the compound will go with me and get put in the parts washer. Once the tailstock and compound are done, that should be about it for the lathe. The only thing left to do will be to get the electric control box done and figure out how I'm going to run power to the lathe after I figure out where I'm gong to put the lathe. I have moved this lathe twice since I brought it home and once I figure out where to put it, I don't want to move it again until I move out of NJ.
You Go Man! Very impressive workmanship and finished product to this point. Great job.

My favorite thread at this point!

Dale
 

rmack898

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#36
Well I have had a lot of things that got in my way of making progress this week so I didn't get too much done.
I did however manage to get the cross slide and taper attachment all completed and installed.

I'm still working on the tailstock and it will probably take me 2 days to get it done but this weekend will be a bust as I will be out of town and next week is filling up with side work. I might have to take a day off from work to get something done on the lathe.

#113.JPG
 

rmack898

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#37
Well I survived a weekend of social events in NYC and a Monday of day job.

I got home and started in on the tailstock casting. Spring is here and the weather has warmed up to the point that I can work outside in 65 degree temps. That makes a big difference when working with adding filler to castings. I can mix up a batch and apply it and be able to sand it in about 15 minutes. I was able to get 3 coats of filler applied and sanded on the tailstock tonight.

I had previously painted the base of the tailstock and got it put on the ways tonight along with re-assembling and installing the hand crank gear for the tailstock, it glides on the ways so smoothly.

I assembled and installed the threading dial too. When I took it apart I was unable to get 2 of the drive screws that held the instruction plate off so I ground the off flush. I installed the instruction plate with 2 new drive screws and used a 2 flute carbide drill chucked up real close to drill the old drive screws out. The 2 flute drill is a bit more rigid and since I only had to drill .325" deep with a hand drill it worked great and I was able to drill the old screws out and use the original locations.
It seems as if I am getting down to the end as I have no big pile of parts laying around the shop, just the tailstock and a few plastic bags of parts left to go through. I never did get the electrical control box painted and re-installed so between applying filler and sanding the tailstock tomorrow I think I will attack the electrical box.

They are calling for rain tomorrow so it should be an early day home from work so I should be able to get a fair bit of work done on the lathe.

#114.JPG #115.JPG #116.JPG #117.JPG #118.JPG
 

tertiaryjim

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#38
It's really nice to see such solid machinery and the fine work your doing.
Thanks for posting this.
 

rmack898

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#39
Well its been a week since the last update. It seems that time is the one thing I don't have enough of, between the springtime domestic chores, my day job, and side work that is booming, it doesn't leave much time left to work on the lathe. But I did however get some things done this week.

I finished prepping and painting the tailstock and I got it installed on the ways. There are shims that go between the base and the tailstock a since its so heavy, I had to use the shop crane to set it down nice and easy without moving the shims. The tailstock has a pinion gear that is used to move it up and down the ways, it has a square shaft and I had been using a Crescent wrench to turn it but I didn't want to keep doing that so I decided to make a crank handle.

I got all of the electrical controls re-installed but still need to run power to the lathe from the RPC. I finally got the compound apart and it needs 2 new bearings that I have on order, with any luck they should be here tomorrow. I got the micrometer stop back together and installed.

The only thing left untouched is the 10" 3-jaw chuck, but I should be able to get it apart and cleaned up this week.

- - - Updated - - -

I forgot to add the pics.

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GK1918

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#40
Amazing work Mac. Gotta thank you for the wonderful idea you gave me. We will name it "the tailstock mover". My GK 1918 takes a man
an two boys to move it. I should think an alum. bracket and rack gear should do the job. thanks
sam
 

stevecmo

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#41
Very nice work Mac! Boy, I really like that color more and more. Thanks for the update.
 

rmack898

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#42
Well the bearings that I needed for the compound rest did show up and I got it all put back together and installed. The compound caused me the most headaches and frustration on this whole lathe. I had 2 bad bearings and because one of them had seized, it could not be disassembled as it was put together. After about 3 days of just looking at it I decided that I had to take the bearing apart in place. This meant using a Dremmel tool with a stone to grind a radius in both the inner and outer races so that I could remove the balls which gave me enough wiggle room to get the shaft out.

It's all back together now so I can move on. I got the chuck disassembled and cleaned up. It's a 10" Union3-jaw with-piece jaws. It's old but it looks to be in good shape. I should get it back together and mounted tomorrow.

#131.JPG #132.JPG #133.JPG
 

Ray C

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#43
... Just want to say I've been enjoying your thread. Thanks for taking the time for documenting it...

I'd love to have a piece of beef like that. Machines like that are magical and I still miss the 15-54 Leblond I grew-up on.

Good luck with your machine!


Ray
 

rmack898

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#44
Thanks all, I'm glad you are enjoying this.

My last post is from yesterday that I didn't hit the submit button on till tonight.

Today I got the chuck back together and mounted back on the spindle. I will work on getting the tool post all cleaned and lubed at lunch tomorrow. All that remains to be done is fill all the reservoirs with the proper oil, connect some sparktricity to the lathe and let it run.

Tomorrow could be the day I have waiting for.

#134.JPG #135.JPG
 

David

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#45
I think we are all waiting to see it run!!! Great job. Your shop is looks inviting by the way, nice looking equipment!

David
 

stevecmo

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#46
Mac,

There is some serious machinery in that last picture! You truly are "One very lucky, happy bastard"! :congratulations:

Steve
 

rmack898

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#47
I have 2 more machines to get the "Freshen up" treatment once this lathe is up and running but I will be taking my time on them. I like to take my time but I need this lathe up an running for a job so that's why I got it done in 7 weeks.

The SB shaper will most likely be my next victim and that will probably be a 7-8 month project.
 

rmack898

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#48
I got oil in it, I got power to it, I got no joy.

The controls and motor were wired for 440 VAC so I have a little bit more work to do. I have to rewire the control transformer, replace a blown fuse, and rewire the motor for 220 VAC.

I will be out of town this weekend so I guess it will be sometime next week before I can make chips with this lathe.
 

rmack898

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#49
OK, the wait is over. I got the electric hooked up and had a few little hiccoughs but I got through them resolved and the lathe is up an running. I won't elaborate on the 3 stupid little things I neglected in my excitement but needless to day, I corrected my mistakes.

This lathe is a beast. The first cut I took was at .060" DOC and it didn't even grunt. The next pass I took at .180" and it still didn't notice that it was doing any work. The last test cut that I took tonight was at .220" DOC and the lathe kind of knew it was doing a little work but it sure didn't complain any.

I have been waiting for a long time to get this lathe in service and now that it is ready to go to work, I can't wait to get started on the project that prompted me to finally get this lathe up and running.

- - - Updated - - -

I forgot to mention, that's a piece of 3" 4140 in the chuck.

#139.JPG #140.JPG #141.JPG
 

itsme_Bernie

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#51
Man oh man, that is absolute work of art.. And one that does work! Look at that chip! Man, I'd love to see more pics of cuts and chips, and maybe even videos!!! Man that's beautiful



Bernie
 

ome

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#52
What a beautiful machine.
Would love to see her in action.
Good Luck and Enjoy.
Jon
 

mgalusha

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#53
Beautiful! I've been eagerly awaiting this day, such a magnificent machine and your work is beautiful.

Sent from my SM-P600 using Tapatalk
 

geryuri2

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#54
Thanks for the memories - the shop I served my apprentiship with had an American Pacemaker about one or two sizes bigger. What a sweet machine! Toolsteel replaceable ways, 27 speed gearbox you can shift with just 2 levers. That was a big machine, but it would spool up to 2000 rpm. Once had a fellow worker brag how he was using the highest feed on it - not likely! .094"/rev! It had some very neat features, like a cross slide stop which allowed about 3 revs of the handwheel to a positive stop, great for threading, just do yourinfeed with the compound. It was a monster, but it was my favourite machine. Thanks for sharing, and beautiful work!
 
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