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[4]

1939 Delta Dp 220 Drill Press - Looks New

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Glenn Brooks

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#1
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My boy called me from an estate sale today and said "dad, do you want another drill press?" I said no, then he texted me a photo and I said "buy it and wait for me, I just left the house and am on the way over."

So now I have this almost immaculate Delta drill press sitting in my shop. The serial number (5-1768) indicates it was made pre -1940. The original manual that came with it is dated 1937, as are the patent dates on the manufacturers plate. So Iam thinking it was purchased locally here in Washington between 1937 and 1939.

I put a dial indicator on the spindle and measured .002" runout on the chuck ( my other Delta dp220 has .017" runout). And what is most amazing, the column and spindle look new, as do the decals from the hardware store where purchased. This thing shines like it has been buffed and polished - up in the head casting where no one one can reach without a complete tear down. The old timer who owned the machine kept it inside his house in a heated small shop built into a downstairs spare bedroom - probably all its life. He installed a little stainless/polished chrome pull rod on the starter switch, and a sanding disk on the bottom of the motor. Also has an apparently original chrome light attached to the side of the head.

Anyway, Iam amazed at the condition. And now wondering what to do with four drill presses.

Here are some pics...
 

FLguy

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#3
I'm jealous!!
 

wawoodman

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#4
That is beautiful!

Mine has no badge or serial # plate, so I can't definitely date it. But it's not as old (or nice) as yours.
 

Glenn Brooks

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#5
Thanks Mike,

One thing I just learned is that Delta produced three distinct versions of the 17" DP. The earliest " Delta" has a fairly narrow and skinny shield surrounding the pully on top of the drill head. This is what's on my 'new' 1939 model. The "Delta Milwaukee", produced from around 1950 onwards has a more wide shield - easily 2-3" wider. Almost proportionally the same width as it is tall. Finally the Delta - Rockwell -well I don't know how it looks as haven't ever seen one except in pictures. but the Delta -Rockwell started in production somethime in the late '60's.

So maybe you could date your machine, at least generally, by the dimensions of the pully guard. I could send you the measurements on my two machines if you like. Or stop by and take a look. We are in the Woodinville area.

Correction: looks like I was mistaken about dating these machines by the shield around the pully. Just saw a 'Delta Milwaukee' branded DP on Craig's list with the more modern shield made in 1944. Much earlier than I thought.

Regards
Glenn
 
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tweinke

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#6
Beautiful machine! If the table didn't have a few dings that could be NOS. Congratulations on your find. :encourage:
 

GarageGuy

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#7
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My boy called me from an estate sale today and said "dad, do you want another drill press?" I said no, then he texted me a photo and I said "buy it and wait for me, I just left the house and am on the way over."

So now I have this almost immaculate Delta drill press sitting in my shop. The serial number (5-1768) indicates it was made pre -1940. The original manual that came with it is dated 1937, as are the patent dates on the manufacturers plate. So Iam thinking it was purchased locally here in Washington between 1937 and 1939.

Anyway, Iam amazed at the condition. And now wondering what to do with four drill presses.
Wow, that's the nicest one I've ever seen. I wonder if it really is original and un-restored? VERY cool!

GG
 

Glenn Brooks

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#8
Yep, original and un-restored! At least the water soluable decals from the hardware store that sold it are still in place. Pretty good sign it's original. The only thing that appears to be repainted is the base. I can tell it's been spray painted sometime in the past with a slightly different shade of grey.

Haha. Iam thinking about taking it inside and storing it in the spare bedroom next winter to help prevent rust in my unheated shop.

Glenn
 
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