• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • How to Donate to Support the Forum and Upgrade Your Account

    To upgrade your account, click on your name/User ID, and your profile box comes up. On the right side (highlighted above) you will see "Account Upgrades" Click on this, and you will see your upgrade choices:

    * Premium Membership - recurring (12 months, recurring) $25.00 per year This is for one-year premium membership, automatically renews. Less ads, more access.

    *Premium Membership - non-recurring (12 months, non-recurring) $30.00 for 1 year This is for one-year premium membership, does NOT automatically renew. Less ads, more access.

    * Sustaining Membership - recurring (12 months, recurring) $50.00 per year This is for one-year sustaining membership, automatically renews each year. No ads.

    * Sustaining Membership - non-recurring (12 months, non-recurring) $50.00 for 1 year This is for one-year sustaining membership, does not automatically renew each year. No ads.

[4]

3D Printers

January Project of the Month [3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

paris_tj

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
6
Likes
0
#1
I am looking at getting/building one but wow they are a bunch. Which is the best to get now days for a person on a budget? Any suggestions or links appreciated. I have a CNC mill so if I need to machine parts that is no big deal.
 

coherent

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2013
Messages
131
Likes
103
#6
I rolled the dice and bought a Flashforge creator clone off of ebay by a company called Qidi Tech. I think it was about $600 over a year and a half ago. It's been great, prints well, is precise and has been trouble free. Has a full metal/plexi windows & lighted enclosure. Just make sure you get something with a heated bed and a dual extruders. Other than that the larger the print area the better of course. Prices continue to drop. They are a blast to play with and nice to have when you need a little dohickey... you can just make one!
 

Profkanz

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2016
Messages
31
Likes
12
#7
SeeMeCNC has a reasonably priced kit.
And MatterControl is a powerful free slicer software.
 

Rick O'Shay

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2017
Messages
3
Likes
1
#9
I am looking at getting/building one but wow they are a bunch. Which is the best to get now days for a person on a budget? Any suggestions or links appreciated. I have a CNC mill so if I need to machine parts that is no big deal.
I recently ordered this kit (~$185) from GearBest, http://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_428455.html .
I have been using a Solidoodle 3 3D printer (~800 assembled) for about 4 years or so and am currently making my own approximatedly 30' by 30" by 30" printer using mostly vslot components, purchased or 3D printed from "OpenBuilds" website. I chose the $185 kit based on specs, i.e large print volume etc. Here is a tip that I chose to ignore with my 3D printer. I never worried about the filament (1.75mm) absorbing moisture. It certainly does slowly over time and you end up thinking the bed isn't level. I googled the problem and settled on
I am looking at getting/building one but wow they are a bunch. Which is the best to get now days for a person on a budget? Any suggestions or links appreciated. I have a CNC mill so if I need to machine parts that is no big deal.
I ordered http://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_428455.html a week ago based on using my Solidoodle 3 (~$800) printer for about 4 years and the kit's large build volume and low price. Don't ignore caveats to keep your filament dry as I did. It's hydoscophic and will absorb water over time resulting in progressively worse prints. I build this to dry out my filament:
http://taulman3d.com/drying-materials.html
Also, I bought a ~10lb bag of dessicant (kitty litter:
) to store my filament when not in use. Hope this helps.
 

Dr_Romeo_Chaire

Ears got caught in a rice picker
Registered Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2017
Messages
9
Likes
4
#10
If you just want to get your "feet wet" with 3D printing, monoprice.com has a small unit for around $200 (MP Select Mini). It has a lot of nice features including a heated bed and small display. The main disadvantage is that the build volume is a 4.7" cube .. however, you can make a lot of useful things in that size, and if you decide 3D printing is for you, you'll be able to make a better decision about what kind of bigger unit to build/buy.
 

Dr_Romeo_Chaire

Ears got caught in a rice picker
Registered Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2017
Messages
9
Likes
4
#11
I recently ordered this kit (~$185) from GearBest, http://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_428455.html .
... Don't ignore caveats to keep your filament dry as I did. It's hydoscophic and will absorb water over time resulting in progressively worse prints. I build this to dry out my filament:
http://taulman3d.com/drying-materials.html
Also, I bought a ~10lb bag of dessicant (kitty litter:
) to store my filament when not in use. Hope this helps.
Thanks for the tip on the Silica cat litter! I was starting to look for a cheap source -- the packets are expensive!

I also built the Taulman dryer out of a Home Depot "Homer" bucket. It works, but I find that a full reel gets a little too warm near the bulb (visibly alters PLA slightly), so I plan on making a bigger/better version from a medium sized galvanized garbage can (10 gal or so?) to hold more filament reels and give a little more distance from the heat source (maybe add a small fan to circulate the heated air).

I'm also eyeing my wife's foodsaver, which doesn't get much use... no point in drying out the filament only to let it re-absorb moisture. 1-Gallon Ziplock bags with dessicant are probably good enough, but as long as the foodsaver is just sitting there taking up counterspace ...
 

brav65

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
911
Likes
461
#12
Check out Tevo, they have a number of different styles of printers at different price points. I bought a Tarantula and am very happy with it. The best part is that each printer has a very active Facebook group that is a great source for answering set up questions as well as upgrades.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/TEVO.3dprinter.owners/
 

Davd Flowers

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2017
Messages
59
Likes
24
#13
I have a flashforge creator pro, a Rostock max, and a folgertech FT5. Im partial to the Rostock, but they all have their ups and downs.
 

Dr_Romeo_Chaire

Ears got caught in a rice picker
Registered Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2017
Messages
9
Likes
4
#14
Check out Tevo, they have a number of different styles of printers at different price points. I bought a Tarantula and am very happy with it. The best part is that each printer has a very active Facebook group that is a great source for answering set up questions as well as upgrades.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/TEVO.3dprinter.owners/
I don't do facebook, but found them online -- yeah, they look nice -- RepRap designs?. Again, I think the best way to get started and see if you even like 3D printing, is to get a low-cost machine with good community support and start there.

Personally, I've been using a printrbot simple metal (1403) for a couple of years and am pretty happy with it. The initial cost was about $700, then I started upgrading: heated bed, 250mm X axis, 250mm Z axis, gear-drive extruder, high-flow hotend... another $350 over a year or so.

Now that I know what I'm doing I'm ready to build my own (bigger) machine, maybe with some CNC/laser engraving capabilities. Looking back though, I could've gotten to this point for a *lot* less money!
 

gjmontll

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2012
Messages
190
Likes
77
#15
Check out Tevo, they have a number of different styles of printers at different price points. I bought a Tarantula and am very happy with it. The best part is that each printer has a very active Facebook group that is a great source for answering set up questions as well as upgrades.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/TEVO.3dprinter.owners/
Yes, their Facebook group is very active, I joined it last week. My Tevo Tarantula is on order and should arrive this week.
 

brav65

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
911
Likes
461
#16
Great, mine is torn apart right now to add MGN rails to all axis as well as changing out all the acrylic parts for aluminum. Just been so busy with work I cannot find the time to get it back together.
 

Qdeathstar

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
20
Likes
10
#17
For your first printer, I would recommend a kit from replikeo. It is a cheap printer, like around 300, you will have to built it yourself, you will need to upgrade the hot end to an e3d v6... but, you will get a lot of learning experience and troubleshooting expereince. I got some good prints from that machine...

But, it only lasted about a year before the acme screws wore out. That will be enough time for you to decide if you like 3d printing. It's not plug and print no matter how much money you spend for an fdm printer, there are just too many variables and it requires massive amounts of troubleshooting. I think for you to enjoy 3d printing, you will need to enjoy troubleshooting.

After that printer I got a seemecnc v2. It is a very nice, well thought out printer. It has a large build volume and is able to produce high quality prints without the need for upgrades out of the box, it costs 999. It took me about 30 hours to build, though the new v3 is supposed to take much less time.

Once you get that printer dialed in the first thing I recommend upgrading is the electronics. I highly recommend the DuetWifi from David Crocker. It is the single best upgrade I have made to any of my printers. It instantly makes the steppers quiet, it has a lovely web interface, a nice autocalibration feature for deltas, and can support larger steppers with higher currents than most other controllers.

Right now I am building a custom coreXY machine. I had it partially completed using just a drill press and a table saw before I decided to get a mill... but now that I have a mill I will redo a lot of the components taking advantage of the precision a mill allows.
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,983
Likes
2,830
#18
For your first printer, I would recommend a kit from replikeo. It is a cheap printer, like around 300, you will have to built it yourself, you will need to upgrade the hot end to an e3d v6... but, you will get a lot of learning experience and troubleshooting expereince. I got some good prints from that machine...
...............
After that printer I got a seemecnc v2. It is a very nice, well thought out printer. It has a large build volume and is able to produce high quality prints without the need for upgrades out of the box, it costs 999. It took me about 30 hours to build, though the new v3 is supposed to take much less time.
...............
Right now I am building a custom coreXY machine. I had it partially completed using just a drill press and a table saw before I decided to get a mill... but now that I have a mill I will redo a lot of the components taking advantage of the precision a mill allows.
Hi @Qdeathstar

First I want to say welcome to the group!

Second, Thanks for sharing your direct experiences with multiple 3D printers.

I am kinda stuck in a circle of indecision. I don't know enough about them to know what I want, and there's too many to choose from. I have even contacted a couple vendors and had many back-and-forth discussions but still don't feel that I know enough to pull the trigger.

Analysis paralysis!

-brino

EDIT too bad replikeo doesn't list prices for their units.
 
Last edited:

Qdeathstar

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
20
Likes
10
#19
It looks like they closed shop. I would get an prussa i3 for my first printer. They are a lot easier to calibrate than deltas.

This looks like an interesting i3 kit

https://www.3dprintersonlinestore.com/flsun-3d-metal-frame-prusa-i3-diy-kit

They are using acrylic for some bracing; you'll have to get rid of that almost immediately with aluminum, but its a workable kit overall. Should last at least a year, and then you still have the extrusions and steppers than can be reused. The good thing about cheap kits is they let you see if you like 3D printing before you drop a lot of money on it. People get frustrated because they spend a lot of money on a printer and still have to troubleshoot and upgrade... no way around that.
 

Splat

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2012
Messages
1,029
Likes
115
#20
I know quite a few guys into the 3d stuff. Most went with the Monoprice MP Select Mini 3D Printer, V1 and some got the V2. Very good reviews from all my buds on that one, especially for the price. If you want a bigger build plate then the HICTOP CR-10 3D is an excellent choice for the price and performance. That's the one I'm seriously eyeballing.
 

Dr_Romeo_Chaire

Ears got caught in a rice picker
Registered Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2017
Messages
9
Likes
4
#21
I know quite a few guys into the 3d stuff. Most went with the Monoprice MP Select Mini 3D Printer, V1 and some got the V2. Very good reviews from all my buds on that one, especially for the price.
+1 on this recommendation.

I am kinda stuck in a circle of indecision. I don't know enough about them to know what I want, and there's too many to choose from.
IMO, spend as little as possible to get your feet wet and see if you like 3D printing or not (just saw a monoprice email advertising a refurb version of this model on sale for $143). That way you don't have to overthink it too much and you have some money left over to buy a better machine later when you know more.

Whatever you buy, keep in mind they all need some degree of tuning, and that is an ongoing process. There's definitely some art to getting good prints and patience/perseverance is required (of course, that's where you learn something!)

Also, its good to get a popular unit for your first printer since you can find answers online in the support communities. Good luck!
 

cs900

maker of chips
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2016
Messages
192
Likes
202
#22
+1 on this recommendation.

IMO, spend as little as possible to get your feet wet and see if you like 3D printing or not (just saw a monoprice email advertising a refurb version of this model on sale for $143). That way you don't have to overthink it too much and you have some money left over to buy a better machine later when you know more.

Whatever you buy, keep in mind they all need some degree of tuning, and that is an ongoing process. There's definitely some art to getting good prints and patience/perseverance is required (of course, that's where you learn something!)

Also, its good to get a popular unit for your first printer since you can find answers online in the support communities. Good luck!
+2 on the MP mini. My brother, who is sole purpose on earth is to master 3d printing, has one and is very happy with it for the price.

But as Dr pointed out, and it's especially true on the cheaper printers, things need a good calibration when you get them and as routine maintenance.
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
143
Likes
140
#23
I find it interesting that people don't mention the Prusa printers. I have one and absolutely love it. They just came out with the Mk3 version which has features that you will not find even on printers costing 3 times as much..
Another reason that I purchased a Prusa is because Joseph (Prusa) has put a lot of time and effort into the 3D arena, and I wanted to support him. In exchange, they provide incredible support for you if you have an issue and have actually bought a genuine Prusa printer. The only way to do that BTW is buy from their store. If you buy it from somewhere else, it is a clone, which there are hundreds out there of his machine. He is the Granddaddy of RepRap too.

For the money, you just can't beat it in my opinion.

Original Prusa I3 Mk3
 

cs900

maker of chips
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2016
Messages
192
Likes
202
#24
yeah the new MK3 looks super nice. Missed step detection? sign me up!
 

Qdeathstar

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
20
Likes
10
#25
It uses an 8bit Rambo board... I would be more interested if it was using duetWifi electronics. It is 32 bit (which I admit is probably not necessary for a Cartesian printer) and a second to none web interface..... I found octoprint clunky compared to the interface provided by the duet.

It's also 1000 dollars for a smallish print area with limited options for enclosure...
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
143
Likes
140
#26
It looks like they closed shop. I would get an prussa i3 for my first printer. They are a lot easier to calibrate than deltas.

This looks like an interesting i3 kit

https://www.3dprintersonlinestore.com/flsun-3d-metal-frame-prusa-i3-diy-kit
It uses an 8bit Rambo board...

It's also 1000 dollars for a smallish print area with limited options for enclosure...
I.e. Your first quote above. That is a clone, not a genuine Prusa printer. There is literally only one place you can buy a Prusa, and that is from the Prusa company in Prague. There are hundreds of clones that use the Prusa name.

Look at this link. Tom's hardware. He is one of the best guys out there for knowledgeable reviews and insights.

And finally, the cost of the kit is $750 for the Mk3. $599 for the Mk2s, which in my opinion can't be beat from a price vs performance ratio.

I almost bought a CR-10 and I am so glad I didn't.
 

Qdeathstar

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
20
Likes
10
#27
The clone cost me $350 if I include the e3d upgrade I bought for it with dual extrusion... It's a nice entry level printer, a lot less than 750 plus upgrades to get to dual extrusion for a hobby you may not like.

Plus, it teaches you a lot about 3D printing....

My point is get a cheap printer as your first printer, and with so many Prussa clones, it makes sense to start there.
 
Last edited:

Qdeathstar

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
20
Likes
10
#28
What was wrong with the cr-10? The z-stability and hot end would be my major guesses.
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
143
Likes
140
#29
For me, one of the biggest issues was support. Am I going to actually get one when I pay for it? Lots of folks had paid Gearbest or whomever for their CR-10, only to be stuck in limbo, and then have to try and get their money back.

Heated bed on the Prusa. Not that the CR-10 doesn't have one, it is just that the Prusa's heated bed is just that, the bed and the PEI coating (tape, albiet one homogeneous layer). No glass plate in the middle to mess with. I had worked with a SUPER early Lulzbot (Ao-101) which was an expensive machine in its day. The heated bed on the Lulzbot sucked in my opinion, and I when examined pictures of the CR-10, it appeared to have the same bed system.
Z system. With a build area that big, not sure how they get the accuracy that they claim with only one side driven.
The hot end on the Prusa is pretty much ready set go. It will print almost anything you can throw at it, although I have only printed PLA and PETG. Both stuck to the PEI beautifully with no "juice" treatment. The Prusa has bed (actually head) adjustability that will just make you smile. I printed a 4 square pattern on my Prusa, carefully examined the print, and could level the bed by a 20 or 30 microns to really dial it in. Maybe you can do that on the CR-10 but I doubt it.
As I mentioned before, support was a big issue for me, and part of the support that is "baked in" to the Prusa is the Prusa Control software and Slicr Prusa edition. Both have the Prusa printer integrated into the slicing program and I will have to say it works pretty much flawlessly. In fact, when I first started using PrusaControl, I felt there wan't enought options/settings to give me control, but I quickly found out that I really did not need to mess with the settings hardly at all because the Prusa team already had them dialed in to the program. And yet, if you want to, you can fire up Slicr Prusa edition and it will give you a lot of control over your printing.

The two things that I do like about the CR-10 is print size and the linear roller bearing system that they have for their axis movement. Prusa uses LM8UU linear bearings, and I personally do not think that they are very good quality at all. Sure, they work, but it is louder than it should nor needs to be. One final nudge for me towards the Prusa was the fact that my daughter's future brother-in-law has four 3D printers. Two of them are Makerbot Replicator+'s and the other is a Prusa. He told me he wished he would have just bought the Prusa due to ease of use, and cost vs performance ratio.

I am sure that the CR-10 works great for a lot of people. I am just really happy that I went with the Genuine Prusa i3. I will be doing the upgrade to the 2.5 here shortly.


Prusa vs. CR-10

Here is a reader's comment from the video below. Not mine but ...LOL
"cr-10 takes all from the reprap community and gives nothing back. They are a parasite. Prusa ontinues to add to the reprap community"
Prusa i3 Mk2 and the CR-10
 

Qdeathstar

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2017
Messages
20
Likes
10
#30
Makerbot is probably worse than any chinese firm regarding supporting the 3d printing community. They are the patent trolls of the 3d prining community. Creality is a cost-leader and Prussa Is a technology-leader.


An i3 with linear raises would be interesting ^_^

Creality added a belt on both sides of the z axis now.
 
[6]
[5] [7]