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[4]

7/8” reamer- What Now?

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Glenn Brooks

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#1
Ahaha, so here’s a great idea gone awry.

Just received this great eBay buy - a NOS 7/8” reamer! Bought it to size the axle bore for a new spur gear on an old 1950’s hand crank sheet metal roller machine we are restoring.

E4C0C827-AF2F-4105-8A80-5B42BB6FC641.jpeg


Only problem is, the shaft is around 3/4”- way to big for my 3 MT lathe tailstock chuck! What was I thinking!??

Now what do I do???

Am thinking about turning the end down to 1/2” so I can chuck it up. Or maybe try to turn in into a 3 MT shank... but afraid to screw up the concentricity of the shaft...

Any ideas how to best make use of this beast?
Glenn
 

pstemari

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#2
I'd make an adapter with an MT3 shank and a hole in the front to fit the shank and set screws to clamp it.

The other option is to mount the workpiece to the saddle and chuck the reamer in the headstock.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

extropic

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#3
I expect it has centers on both ends. Turn it between centers to reduce an inch of the shank.
 

Hukshawn

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#4
Just reduce the shank.
I did that with a bunch of large taper shank drills I obtained a while back.
 

ddickey

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#5
If you use ER collets you could buy an MT3 collet chuck. Nice tool to have around.
 

Asm109

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#7
I've seen a lot of reamers with the last inch or so turned down to fit a smaller chuck.
 

rgray

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#8
If you use ER collets you could buy an MT3 collet chuck.
That gets my vote.
I got an ER-40 mt3 chuck. works in my tailstock for times like that and with the mt5-mt3 adapter that came with my lathe it also works in the headstock. Made a drawbar for it for the headstock, depending on what I'm doing it's often not needed for light small jobs.
 

Glenn Brooks

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#9
Unfortunately, don’t have any Er collets, but might be worth looking into. Think I will try turning down the diameter to fit my existing chuck. I plan to use this reamer to clean up a bunch of other holes in miniature train wheels latter in the summer. So lots of usage on the board, beyond the one spur gear.

Thanks all,
Glenn
 

kd4gij

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#12
A) buy a 3/4" chuck,
B) Buy a 3mt er40 collet chuck,
C) buy an 3mt 3/4" end mill holder,
D) All of the above.
 

mmcmdl

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#14
Make a split sleeve for your boring bar holder if neccesary or use a #2 tool holder and tram it in true .
 

projectnut

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#15
If you have a surface grinder and a spin indexer I would fixture the shank in a 5C collet then grind the last inch or so to a size that will fit your chuck. I've done this successfully to both reamers and end mills. I've also relieved the shank on several end mills for clearance when plunging deep holes.
 

dlane

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#16
Shaft should be soft enough to turn down to 1/2 - 5/8” that’s what I did with my large reamers so I can use them in whatever .
 
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