[4]

935 table rubber T-slot ends

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
707
What are the rubber chunks residing in the T-slots near the end of the table for? Flood coolant damming? They appear to be proud of the table, why is that?

2018-11-03_22-19-59.jpg
 

mmcmdl

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 31, 2016
Messages
1,437
2 things . They keep chips from entering the end of the tee slots ( which are a pita to clean out ) , and also act as coolant dams if your machine has a drain in the back . I can't see the back but most likely you have them .
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
6,422
I am confused. Chips usually enter the t-slots from the top, not from the ends. Also, if I am using coolant, I want it to drain, not become an overflowing lake in the t-slots. Please help me to understand this...
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
707
I probably should have qualified - mine is a '935' mill, not PM-935. Suspect the same machine but since I thought I saw same rubber on PM machines figured I'd ask here. Anyway this shows the rubber & how it stands proud of mill table which I find odd. I'd rather have it flush or recessed so table protection mats don't rise up on the ends or any chance of misaligned extended stock. My table also has a threaded coolant hole in both L&R pocket so the damn/diversion makes sense. I don't use flood right now so they are basically open.

IMG_7632_edited-1.jpg

IMG_7633_edited-1.jpg

IMG_7634_edited-1.jpg

IMG_7624_edited-1.jpg
 

darkzero

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 27, 2012
Messages
3,446
I probably should have qualified - mine is a '935' mill, not PM-935. Suspect the same machine but since I thought I saw same rubber on PM machines figured I'd ask here. Anyway this shows the rubber & how it stands proud of mill table which I find odd. I'd rather have it flush or recessed so table protection mats don't rise up on the ends or any chance of misaligned extended stock. My table also has a threaded coolant hole in both L&R pocket so the damn/diversion makes sense. I don't use flood right now so they are basically open.
That hole does look like for coolant drain if it goes all the way through to the recess in the table. And if it does then that's probably what those rubber pieces are for, plugs to help stop coolant from flowing out the sides of the table.
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
707
My inclination was to trim them flush but I'll look closer. Maybe a simple matter of sliding them out & remove altogether so nothing stands proud since I think we are agreeing they are to damn flood fluid from leaking out the end. Maybe they are a generic T-item & just so happen to stick up on this table..
 

davidpbest

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
249
My PM935 is the same as yours Peter. My guess is that they machined the t-slots in the table straight through from one end to the other to reduce the manufacturing complexity of plunging down into the coolant well at one end, and pulling out in the well at the other end. Then they filled the t-slots between the coolant wells and the ends of the table with a rubber compound that was designed to swell in place to prevent leaks, and then didn't trim the tops flat. I intend to trim mine just below the surface of the XY table.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
6,422
My Millrite table has slots to the table ends, but also have end caps with cavities in them to catch the coolant. Then end caps have threaded drain holes in them. No rubber required, and glad mine does not have them.
SAM_1425.JPG
 

pstemari

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
May 18, 2015
Messages
413
Yeah, those just look like they want to keep water from getting behind the end cap to the lead screw. The Millrite end cap above is nice, but a much bigger piece with a lot more machining, and I'm guessing it has a hidden gasket to seal the deal between it and the table.

Flood coolant is such a royal PITA.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

petertha

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 15, 2016
Messages
707
This is what was originally installed. A larger brass fitting that threads the casting hole, a reduced brass screw fitting/nozzle, a hose which goes down to the grate in casting base. I've removed it all, don't foresee flood coolant in my future. It wasn't interfering with the DRO encoder tube but the close proximity optics gives me a rash.

The rubber above the mill table top plane does no harm other than it bugs me. If I lay something on my table, I don't want any possibility of it resting on something else that is not the table datum. Where are my OCD meds? WHO took my OCD meds! :/

IMG_7616_edited-1.jpg

IMG_7625_edited-1.jpg
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
6,422
The Millrite end cap above is nice, but a much bigger piece with a lot more machining, and I'm guessing it has a hidden gasket to seal the deal between it and the table.
The Millrite has cast iron end caps, which also serve to hold the lead screw bearings. There is no gasket from the factory(!) A little gasket eliminator does the job of containing the coolant, the machined fit is tight between the end cap and the table. The overall stickout of the lead screw is probably about the same with both types.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top