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A Brass Alarm Clock.

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BRIAN

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#1
I am about to start my next winter project The brass alarm clock from J Wildings book.

I have a new helper in the shop A 11 year old boy Who has zero workshop knowledge.
He will be folowing me step by step building one for himself, so life should be very interesing??

I will post our progress as we go along

His father thinks the money is better spent on brass, than on the Play station.---- I vote for that----

BRIAN

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BRIAN

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#2
Hi Turbo
The only way i know to get plans for this clock is to by the book
look up Ian T Cob he has a great range of books and plans.

BRIAN
 

BRIAN

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#3
WORK HAS STARTED . #@clap2@&

First a word on how I am aproching this.If we have multiples of the same part "Andrea"my helper? will see one that has been made. then he will watch while I make one. then he can make the number he requires under supervision.
So far he has worked 5 hrs this is the result so far P1011313.JPG P1011314.JPG P1011323.JPG P1011324.JPG
 

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BRIAN

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#4
GOT it wrong again this is Andrea's work. One day I will fid out how to work this b---- computer. ::ban him::

P1011325.JPG
 
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BRIAN

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#5
9 hrs in and Andrea has made the pillars. This involved using the lathe, the spigots were turned by having a stop on the carriage to set the length, and then turned down to the required diameter, this involved the use of the micrometer, the readings were written down on the steel bench to ensure that the numbers were correct and the next setting decided upon.

P1011329.JPG P1011332.JPG
 

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Tony Wells

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#6
Brian, it sure is nice to see a younger one interested in making things. Too many are just playing around, and learning nothing of real value. I applaud you for taking the time to nurture this interest.

Also glad to see safety glasses being worn. Nothing takes the fun out of machine work than having to dig a chip out of an eye.

Keep up the great work. It looks like you are a good teacher.
 

Tom Griffin

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#7
Brian,

Where did you get the John Wilding book for your alarm clock? I've been searching for his book on building an English Regulator for some time with no avail. I can get one in the U.K. for an exorbitant amount of cash, but nothing here in the U.S.

Tom
 

BRIAN

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#8
Hi tom

Try www.iancob.co.uk A good supplier of books and materials, normaly he has most books in stock


If you have any problems feel free to see if I can help.

Regards Brian.
 

Tom Griffin

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#9
Thanks Brian.

I actually priced the book from that site a couple years ago and it was $60 plus shipping. Now, the British pound appears to be way down compared to the dollar and the price is $45 plus shipping. That's still pretty pricey for a 100 page paper back book. Clocktools.com used to sell them over here, but the prices got too high and they are selling off the remainder of their stock.

I did place an order today for [FONT=verdana,arial,helvetica][SIZE=-1]"Wheel and Pinion Cutting in Horology: A Historical Guide"[/SIZE][/FONT] by Wild. It looks to be pretty thorough and covers making your own cycloidal gear cutters. Interestingly, Amazon U.K. had the cheapest price and shipping was only $3.99. I don't get it. :thinking:

Tom
 

BRIAN

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#10
Hi Tom

Yeh I find it steep to, and for some reason it costs more to post to Sicly, than to the USA, and I have to pay20% VAT on top.

but so far I have been lucky Father Christmas.has provided all I require.So keep the faith, and ring Rudolph!!!

Most of Wildings books are re hashed articals from M.E or the Horological journal.
if you can find them. It just may be a way.

Regards Brian.
 

BRIAN

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#12
So to continue altho i stoped posting for a while Work has sill been progressing.
The next thing to make was the gears, so the blanks had to be cut to size and the new cutter mounted on its mandrel.

P1011427l.JPG

Then the gears were cut on the mill.

P1011410.JPG

P1011411.JPG

After cutting the teeth the gears have to be marked out for crossing. For this job I have made a jig .

P1011441.JPG

The gear is then put on the mill for crossing. This job is normaly done by hand but I just love my mill.

P1011457.JPG

The next part was the escapement . this has 2 wheels quite unlike a pendulam clock.
First the blank is cut with 15 radial slots.

P1011515.JPG

And then the backs of the teeth are cut to give clearance

P1011415.JPG

Andrea is getting quite a pile of parts, good progress for a lad who had never been in a workshop before,

P1011572.JPG


Thats it for now more to come soon.

Brian.

P1011427l.JPG P1011410.JPG P1011411.JPG P1011441.JPG P1011457.JPG P1011515.JPG P1011415.JPG P1011572.JPG
 

Tom Griffin

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#13
Welcome back Brian. It's nice to see the progress on the alarm clock. Is your helper staying interested as the project progresses?

What tooth form did you use for the gears and did you purchase a cutter for it or make one yourself? I finally got a copy of Wilding's English Regulator book and hope to start it soon. He calls out a module .6 cutter to make all of the wheels but I thought I would try making a simplified hob to cut them.

Tom
 

BRIAN

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#14
Hi tom
If you look at Model engineers utilitys. it has a good section on making clock gear cutters
I have made one from this download and it worked well.
For this clock i purchaced a cutter from Timekeepers workshop. Have a look, the prices are wey below other outlets. You will have to deside on the depth of tooth taditional clocks have long teath modern short , maybe the book will say.
The expence comes in the pinion cutters you need one for every diferent number of leaves. and you cannot get away with cheap cutters.

The lad is OK he wanders a bit when doing hand work, he thinks the harder you push the quicker it will get done. but he enjoys the machines and is good with the micrometer. He is just not used to getting his hands dirty.

Best regards Brian.
 

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#15
Brian,

The project you have set for yourself & Andrea is superb, I would say the youngster has a gift, And his work looks superb It is really good to hear of you helping him , Everyone needs someone, as they start out on lifes path, to show them how to make things, Who knows, Many years from now, he will think on the time you spent teaching him, Maybe it will lead to a career for the kid?
 

BRIAN

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#16
The lantern pinions where turned in the lathe

P1011329m.JPG

the holes drilled and the pins fitted (unfortunately I have lost the photos of the drilling and pin fitting but I have one of the finished pinion ready to be parted off )

P1011408.JPG

The gear and its mating pinion on the depthing tool.

P1011425.JPG

During this time I had also made quite a pile of parts in my box. keeping ahead and sorting the problems.

P1011531.JPG

The time had come to get the movement working in its basic form.

P1011567.JPG

having got the movement working Attention was centered on the motion work.
First centre the cutter.

P1011550.JPG

Set the dividing head to give the tooth spacing.

P1011548.JPG

Then cut two ajacent teeth until the depth is correct.

P1011552.JPG

Then you can cut the rest at the same setting.

P1011554.JPG

until you have a gear.

P1011555.JPG

Things are now close to having a clock that tells the time!!!!

More later Brian

P1011329m.JPG P1011408.JPG P1011425.JPG P1011531.JPG P1011567.JPG P1011550.JPG P1011548.JPG P1011552.JPG P1011554.JPG P1011555.JPG
 

BRIAN

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#17
So now we have all the parts to make the hands turn. First thing to do is to set the gears to run together. this often takes a bit of give and take because we have 2 sets of gears with common centres.

P1011566.JPG

Having established the distance weuse the points on the tool to mark the point for the plate .

P1011568.JPG

The shaft has to be reduced in diameter to give clearance under the small 4 tooth pinion and threaded 10 BA.

P1011569.JPG

After making a pair of hands the whole movement was assembled and placed on the test stand.

P1011573.JPG

This is the position as of now, the clock has run for 18 hrs and lost 35 mins without even trying to regulate it,this is good, as it easy to make it go quicker, but often hard to slow a new clock without it stopping.
Now I have the drive weights--dial-- alarm work-- and perhaps a chime on the hour ( single strike ) Enough to keep the 2 of us working for a while yet.

P1011566.JPG P1011568.JPG P1011569.JPG P1011573.JPG
 

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#18
Brian it is great to see that you are taking the time to teach the young man something that most kids will never see,
and more great is seeing a young man wanting to learn something most young men will never learn it today world.
 

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#19
Andrea has been preocupied with school and church matters for the last 2 weeks , so I have pushed on to smooth out the way for his return.

The alarm on this clock is driven by a similar escapement to the main one. but i thought this one we could make simpler .
So I cut the teeth with a slitting saw .

P1011576.JPG

And then removed the waste with the hand saw.

P1011577.JPG

This proved to be a lot quicker.

next job was to mill the ratchet teeth in the side of the scape
so the mill was set up to the recomended angle.

P1011581.JPG

and the teeth cut.

P1011578.JPG

I was very happy with the result.

P1011580.JPG

Scape now finished ready to put on the clock.

P1011593.JPG

Next will be the dial.

P1011576.JPG P1011577.JPG P1011581.JPG P1011578.JPG P1011580.JPG P1011593.JPG
 

BRIAN

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#20
The brass plate for the dial was attached to a wooden face plate by a centre draw bar and double sided tape then cut out. silvered,

P1011591.JPG

and numbers fixed .

Then a trial line up on the movement.

P1011592.JPG

At last its starting to look like a clock.

Brian

P1011591.JPG P1011592.JPG
 

BRIAN

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#21
With the arival of the bell things started to move rapidly
the bell finial was turned by rotating the tool post then finished with a hand graver.

P1011594.JPG

P1011598.JPG

The full clock was then put on test. prior to moving it into the house.

P1011607.JPG

P1011617.JPG

P1011640.JPG

P1011614.JPG

So its finished, maybe I will add a strike on the HR, but at the moment my hands are full.

Now I have sorted the bugs on my one, Andrea will continue with his but he is also ocupied with school and church matters .

Brian.

P1011594.JPG P1011598.JPG P1011607.JPG P1011617.JPG P1011640.JPG P1011614.JPG
 

BRIAN

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#22
Andrea is back in the shop.after a long lazy summer.
We started on the Foliot arm. setting up the blank in the mill to cut the notches for the weights
using a pinion cutter.
P1011781.JPG

The blank was then roughed out using the small belt sander.

P1011782.JPG

The pile of parts so far.

P1011783.JPG

Coming along nicely.


Brian.

P1011781.JPG P1011782.JPG P1011783.JPG
 

parastoo

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#23
Hi Brian,
I'm trying to build this clock. How did you round the teeth on the main escape wheel? I've tried sandpaper but it has a tendency to produce a barrel shaped front tooth face ; the sandpaper takes more off the top and bottom of the tooth face than the middle.
Thanks,
Mark
 

BRIAN

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#24
HI Mark. Sorry if I am a little late with a answer I have been on holiday in scotland for 3 weeks.
first thing to point out is that the escapement only works on the top 2mm of the tooth so any work you do on the lower part is for looks only??
I use a swiss file to get the basic shape then polish with a emery board. I cant get emery boards localy so I steal my ever tolerant lady's fine nail board, be careful not to reduce the front face only curve the edges, the lower pallet edges must also be rounded.
When you try to make it run you may find that the back curve of the pallet fouls on the tooth that has just been released so you must file away the back curve, but try not to alter the tip of the pallet.
You can also ease the back edge of the tooth to cure this problem.
I hope this helps .Brian
 

parastoo

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#25
Hi Brian,
Thanks for your input.The emery boards sound like a good idea.I'll give them a try.

Mark
 

BRIAN

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#26
At last Andrea's clock is finished, not as an alarm but with a strike on the hour.



P1012636.JPG

Brian.

P1012636.JPG
 
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