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A degree wheel for the Atlas/Craftsman 6X18

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SG51Buss

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I plan to post a series of mods for the Atlas/Craftsman 6x18. Since they're machine specific, I guess they should go into this forum, instead of the 'projects' forum???

This little degree wheel fits on the spindle flange, behind the chuck.
And, just like the feedscrew dials, it gets frequent use.

DegreeWheel01.jpg

It's a simple disc of aluminum, 1/4" thick where it rides on the spindle flange, then flares around the headstock casting to a more visible 0.350" wide outer face.
The ID is slightly less than 1-3/8", because I skimmed the spindle flange OD to get a smooth light drag fit. Your flange diameter may be a bit larger, so adjust the ID dim to fit. You may need to skim your flange as I did.

The wheel needs some sort of grub screw, I used a small 4-40 brass screw with a larger head.

DegreeWheel02.jpg

The wheel is marked for the full 360° by glueing a 0.400" wide strip of 7.200" long paper, pre-printed with the degree markings.

DegreeWheel03.jpg

I made this back in the '90s, when inkjet printers had coarser dot densities. I wanted crisp/clear marking lines, and to achieve that I needed to select a printing size that would ensure that the inkjet dots aligned with the desired marking lines. A circumference of 7.200" would make each degree mark fall on a 0.020" dimension, which worked great for my 300 DPI (Dots-Per-Inch) inkjet printer. Divided by Pi, this makes the OD of the degree wheel 2.292". The printer paper is about 0.004" thick, and I found thru experimentation that an OD of 2.290" allowed the paper strip to perfectly wrap around the circumference.

DegreeWheel01.jpg DegreeWheel02.jpg DegreeWheel03.jpg
 
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SG51Buss

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The paper strip is purposely wider than the wheel. It's carefully cut along the border, then glued to the wheel with the chuck side of the wheel down on a flat surface, to guide the paper strip so that the right edge is aligned. This ensures that the numbers will remain visible and be properly positioned.

I aligned the 0° part of the paper strip over the grub screw hole. The paper has to be carved away from the hole, and it looks like a zero, easy to find.

After the glue has set, the excess paper is trimmed with an Xacto knife, through the degree marking lines, along the wheel edge. Then a couple coats of chemical resistant clear is painted over it.

When done, it should look like this (but much cleaner).

DegreeWheel04.jpg

Ignore the two extra holes. This was made from a piece of scrap...

DegreeWheel04.jpg
 
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SG51Buss

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The pointer is a piece of sheet brass. Cut, bent, and epoxied to the headstock.
This takes a bit of creative finagling, to get a close and easy to read fit.
This one was painted with the headstock. Perhaps black would have been a better color.

DegreeWheel05.jpg

DegreeWheel06.jpg

DegreeWheel05.jpg DegreeWheel06.jpg
 
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SG51Buss

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The finished degree wheel is slid onto the spindle flange, but left loose. Then the chuck is installed, the degree wheel pressed against the backside of the chuck, and snugged down. Keeping the degree wheel against the backside of the chuck ensures that it'll run true and not drag against the pointer.

DegreeWheel07.jpg

That's it. Ready to go.
Now, if the boyz at Tallgrass tools want to make some of these, by all means please do so. I'd buy one...

DegreeWheel07.jpg
 
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wa5cab

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Steve,

Nice looking work. If the two extra holes are tapped, you can tell people that they are for jack screws to aid in removal.:jester:

For the record, for those who might not know, "618" is an Atlas model number, and applies only to the Atlas badged 6X18's. Sears sold the same machine after 1957 but with a Craftsman badge and a model number of 101.21400. Earlier, Atlas built and Sears sold the sleeve bearing 101.07301, which is also a 6X18 but not a 618. I suspect that the tendency to call all 6" lathes with 18" between centers "618's" is the source of the myth that some 618's have 1"-8 spindle nose threads. None do. It's sorta like the tendency among one class of Ham to call ATC's "ART13" (sic) and ATA/ARA and SCR-274-N "ARC5" (sic).

Robert D.
 

SG51Buss

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Thanks, Robert. I was hoping for a response from you. :thumbsup2:

Yes, those holes are threaded, and are indeed used for jackscrews and lift points for the gantry crane :whistle:.

I've read many of your posts (very informative) and understand the '618' issue, and how a street slang moniker develops an unstoppable life of its own, grating on the nerves of the purists. Like 'back pressure' in exhaust discussions.

My machine, inherited from dad, never was badged. Only the gearcover has 2 holes for badging, none in the headstock or bed. Wasn't until the late '80s that I needed to identify it so to find parts. I believe dad mostly dealt with Atlas. It has some mystery components that I'll try to post in future threads.

Am I correct in understanding that, aside from the sleeve-bearing headstock and 1"-8TPI spindle, that everything else is Atlas and Craftsman identical and interchangeable? If so, then many of my future project topics would most likely apply equally to both.

So, what would be the appropriate moniker to use here for this group of machines?
Atlas/Craftsman 6x18, Atlas/Craftsman 6-inch, other???
 

Round in circles

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Thanks for posting and the pictures .

I like the whole idea and may be able to do similar on my lathe ( not an Atlas but similar ) but make it in steel or aluminum as it's cheaper and just as easy to do .

I think that my indicator pointer / viewer will be a small thin slot cut ( Dremmel ground ) in some 1/4 inch thick 2 inch angle aluminum . Cut & set up so it is close to the scale reading that way there will be less chance of taking a false reading . I think there will be enough meat on the headstock casing to take a couple of small locating screws for me to put the viewing window device there.

What has struck me is that with care I may be able to scratch the gradients out on the edge face of the wheel using the cross slide so it looks a bit like my cross slide graduations.
 

Inflight

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Very elegant solution! :thumbsup2: I use an outboard end version on my 10" Atlas machines. I like your's more.



Matt
 

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Great work on the degree wheel, it really looks nice!
:thumbzup3:
 

wa5cab

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Steve,

The Craftsman 101.21400 is identical except for badge and nameplate to the Atlas 618. The Craftsman 101.07301 is mostly the same. Differences are the headstock (casting) and bearings, belt cover, spindle and two of the items on it, and the countershaft bracket. Early 618's had the same bracket. Between 1943 and 1945, it was apparently changed on the 618's but not on the 101.07301's. I may have missed one or two items but think that's all.

For a generic all-inclusive term, I think Atlas/Craftsman 6". That would include the Atlas 612 and the two armature lathes as well as the MK2 and all of the Atlas built Craftsman machines, but not the AA ones. If the widget would also be usable on the AA's, the Atlas/Craftsman & AA 6".

Robert D.

Am I correct in understanding that, aside from the sleeve-bearing headstock and 1"-8TPI spindle, that everything else is Atlas and Craftsman identical and interchangeable? If so, then many of my future project topics would most likely apply equally to both.

So, what would be the appropriate moniker to use here for this group of machines?
Atlas/Craftsman 6x18, Atlas/Craftsman 6-inch, other???
 

Fabrickator

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Steve, It looks real good, but am I'm missing something somewhere where you can lock the spindle at any given degree to ensure that it doesn't move like a true drilled/pinned index plate? Or, is this for reference only.
 

SG51Buss

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Everyone, thanks so much for the positive responses. That makes threads like this so worthwhile. I'm sort of a function-over-form type, so these things won't look pretty, and will probably look amateurish, but should provide ideas. Having a degree wheel is handier than I first expected, kinda like putting a GPS gadget in your car. I can't drive now, without turning the contraption ON.

At the time, the immediate need was for a chuck scroll accurizing project, which will be a future thread. Since then, this degree wheel has become like another instrument in the dash panel, another item in the visual scan. Kinda influences your thinking while machining. You DRO users probably get this.

I use it mostly for reference, like when adjusting runout, or to straighten small diameter rods, or marking a piece for other machining, and such. After a while, you just kinda get dependant on it. It opens the door to new thinking.

Fabrickator, the bull gear has 60 holes and a locking pin for simple indexing. And, the spindle bushings are adjustable for spindle drag. So, I'll use these depending on what I'm flogging.

For example, while making a compensator for my target pistol, I needed to control the machining of slots and ovalled ports. Having the Dremel grinder setup vertically in the milling attachment, I could hog-out ports by hand by swivelling the tommybar chuck a specific angle, like the way you'd use a ball-turning adapter. Another future thread.

I noticed that Sherline offers a custom 'graduated dial' fabrication service, but in minimum order runs of 200. These things sure look nice. Kinda gives ya ideas:

redparts.jpg blkparts.jpg
 

Round in circles

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Once again thanks for the pictures .......... food for thought indeed.
 
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What program did you print the degree markings with. On my old computer I could have done it in Corel, but this new one doesn't have anything worth while on it.

Mark

The paper strip is purposely wider than the wheel. It's carefully cut along the border, then glued to the wheel with the chuck side of the wheel down on a flat surface, to guide the paper strip so that the right edge is aligned. This ensures that the numbers will remain visible and be properly positioned.

I aligned the 0° part of the paper strip over the grub screw hole. The paper has to be carved away from the hole, and it looks like a zero, easy to find.

After the glue has set, the excess paper is trimmed with an Xacto knife, through the degree marking lines, along the wheel edge. Then a couple coats of chemical resistant clear is painted over it.

When done, it should look like this (but much cleaner).

View attachment 87153

Ignore the two extra holes. This was made from a piece of scrap...
 

SG51Buss

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Hey, Mark. That was done on an old '90s DOS-based shareware CAD program, Tango. I had planned to post a .jpg of the drawing, so that members could download it, and print it with appropriate scaling. Unfortunately, that old machine is long gone.

Nowadays, I use Intergraph's SmartSketch, recommended by a friend who worked there. It has the features I like without the trappings of constant upgrades. I've used it to post similar graduated scales, like the attached, but never received feedback if members use them, so I'm not sure if it's helpful...

XS650 Clutch Guage.jpg
 
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Hey, Mark. That was done on an old '90s DOS-based shareware CAD program, Tango. I had planned to post a .jpg of the drawing, so that members could download it, and print it with appropriate scaling. Unfortunately, that old machine is long gone.

Nowadays, I use Intergraph's SmartSketch, recommended by a friend who worked there. It has the features I like without the trappings of constant upgrades. I've used it to post similar graduated scales, like the attached, but never received feedback if members use them, so I'm not sure if it's helpful...

I would use it. I hate to have to download software and learn to use it just for one project and I sure won't buy software for this one project. I intend to make one of these and adapt it to my south bend lathe and I want it as big as I can go which is up to 6" in diameter. I am going to fasten it to the rear of the chuck. I do a lot of indexing on my lathe but the method I use is poor at best. I think this thing is great. Just have to work out drawing it.

Mark Frazier
 

SG51Buss

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Wow, 6" diameter? That'll take an 18" strip. I think the largest you can get on an inkjet printer is just under 10.5", maybe 12" if it's printed diagonally. That cuts you down to a 3 1/4" - 4" diameter. Sounds like a job for Kinko's...
 
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Wow, 6" diameter? That'll take an 18" strip. I think the largest you can get on an inkjet printer is just under 10.5", maybe 12" if it's printed diagonally. That cuts you down to a 3 1/4" - 4" diameter. Sounds like a job for Kinko's...

I'd settle for what I can print on a legal page (13")

Mark
 

SG51Buss

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Okay, I'll draw up a couple of marking strips, one for each direction, and post it here when I'm done. In the meantime, I suppose one option would be to use a simple tape measure.

If you took an 'inch' tape measure, marked in 1/16" increments, you could cut out maybe a 1/4" wide strip of the edge that has the individual markings. Then, at 1/16" per degree mark, that'll be 360/16 = 22.5" for the circumference, which would wrap around a 7.16" diameter wheel.

TapeMeasureInch.jpg

Or, use a metric tape measure, with 1mm per degree, that'll be 360mm (14.173") for the circumference, which would wrap around a 4.51" diameter wheel. You could even leave the numeral markings on it (which would be in centimeters), and add a 'zero' to each number.

TapeMeasureMetric01.jpg

TapeMeasureMetric02.jpg

Or, you could get some automotive adhesive-backed pin-striping tape, and meticulously mark each 0.050", which would give you a 18" strip for the circumference, which would wrap around a 5.73" diameter wheel. Or find some with preprinted markings.

MagnaTag-TPcover.jpg

TapeMeasureInch.jpg TapeMeasureMetric01.jpg TapeMeasureMetric02.jpg MagnaTag-TPcover.jpg
 

Round in circles

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If you can't do the scale big enough on one sheet of paper make it in parts .

Decide the diameter you'd like for the indicator disk/wheel ( it may well be slightly different at the end of the exercise ) .

Then use Pi times Diameter = circumference . Pi being 3.142 or 22/7 to five or more places if you feel like it .

Adjust the diameter so the circumference is exactly divisible by 360 so you can design a scale in degrees . Make it so you can clearly identify one division per degree .Turn you disk to the exact diameter needed . ( check your figures a couple of times )

Use eXcel of similar to make & print off on two exact scales with numbering and bigger marks at the five & ten degree points . make the scales in 180 degrees or three of 120 degrees or four of 90 degrees , glue & tape them in carefully place on the disk or use a big heat shrink band etc etc. .
 

Round in circles

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Okay, I'll draw up a couple of marking strips, one for each direction, and post it here when I'm done. In the meantime, I suppose one option would be to use a simple tape measure.

If you took an 'inch' tape measure, marked in 1/16" increments, you could cut out maybe a 1/4" wide strip of the edge that has the individual markings. Then, at 1/16" per degree mark, that'll be 360/16 = 22.5" for the circumference, which would wrap around a 7.16" diameter wheel.

View attachment 87461

Or, use a metric tape measure, with 1mm per degree, that'll be 360mm (14.173") for the circumference, which would wrap around a 4.51" diameter wheel. You could even leave the numeral markings on it (which would be in centimeters), and add a 'zero' to each number.

View attachment 87462

View attachment 87463

Or, you could get some automotive adhesive-backed pin-striping tape, and meticulously mark each 0.050", which would give you a 18" strip for the circumference, which would wrap around a 5.73" diameter wheel. Or find some with preprinted markings.

View attachment 87464

Take care with plastic paper or surveyors flat steel tapes etc they might been made in China or India etc and leave a lot to be desired wrt. accuracy . Self adhesiv tapes tend to stretch how ever there are some failry accurate wood working device adhesive strip measures that might be useable as they tend to be on a strong plastic metalized backing .

I'll have a look on line for the sort of thing I'm thinking of . An 18 cm long one would be a bit of a small indicator disk but several could be a whole new ball game

eBay item 111483477188 is a Starret metal flat tape in imperial & metric which are usually fairly accurate at 60 o F

So 360 mm .... 36 cm in divisions of one five & ten making 360 millimetres ) being a circle in degrees sounds ideal

3.14258 pi to 5 places x 114.52 mm diameter =359.91918 decrees or as near as dammit 36 centimeter

114.52 mm / 25.4 = inches diameter = 4.5087 inches to five places
.
 
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wa5cab

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22/7 is an approximation. Pi to five places is 3.14159

Robert D.
 
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Wow..... this is fascinating. I been racking my brain trying to get this stupid computer to scale me a drawing or even make one and can't do it for some reason.:eek:uch::whiteflag: ( well, could be i ain't smart enough. I get dumber as I get older.). Maybe I can work with some of these suggestions. thanks guys.


Mark Frazier

I don't really care about the diameter. I just want it as large as I can which is between 4 and 6 inches somewhere and I want it to look nice. That why I want to print it , plus I have magnetic paper (heavy) that is also very sticky on one side and I can run it through my printer. I have 5 inch round steel I can cut down to a needed diameter.:pondering:
 

Round in circles

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22/7 is an approximation. Pi to five places is 3.14159

Robert D.
That's interesting Robert ... I was taught at the Electrical & Mechanical Engineering Apprentice college that I attended for 3 yrs was that 22/7 was the right equation that's why it never works out as a decimal .

I'm intrigued , can you point me to any places that explain how it is derived please? .
 

Round in circles

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Thanks for that John ...my head .....it's going... going "Round in circles.

By the time I'd speed read to about half the reference ... I nearly lost the will to live :lmao:


It's interesting to see that there are so many new accuracies for it . I'd never heard of anything other than old Archimedes way as being 22/7 .

It only goes to show that you can learn something new every day ( especially if you suffer from the early stages of Alzheimer's like I seem to do :rofl:).
 
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I give up :whiteflag: . I just spent 5 hours trying to print a scale from several software programs. I got close , but me and this computer are not getting along.:banghead::banghead: . I'm going to the shop and do what I do best, cut metal and make chips. I got along 45 years without a degree wheel , I guess I'll make it till I die without one too.


Mark
 
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