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A Margraf clock

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#1
In 1596 Rudolfo Margraf clock maker to Roudolfo 3rd ( Hapsburg ) made a rolling ball clock with a fixed inclined plane and a lifting system to return the ball to the top.
I intend to use this basic idea to make a modern version, using plastic and alloy for the main parts of its construction.

This clock will be made totaly "On the fly" so things may change as we go along??
The first part to be made is part of the ball lifting system.

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Brian.

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#2
I am one of your biggest fans Brian. I will be watching all the way. You are a master at this.

"Billy G" :man:
 

BKtoys

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i'm also a big fan your threads also in a very short time i have learned a lot about clocks , on the 3rd when i get paid i plan on buying your book on the dark lady. keep up the most excellent work:allgood:thanks a lot Brian A
 
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#4
Hi all.
I have not finalized how I am going to lay out the frame plates for this clock, so I am going to make the gears first ,before commiting myself, the inclined plane takes a lot of room .

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Brian.

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#5
Another gear 200 teeth on this one.

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The first pass.

Just needs crossing out




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#6
As always Brian I am amazed at your craftsmanship. Awesome !!!

"Billy G"
 
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#7
Thank you Bill, so far it's all made from scrap boat hatches and windows I added another gear today, another 200 teeth.
coming along nicely.

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I am thinking of a 10" dial for this one!

Brian

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34_40

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#8
As the other folks have said.. Thanks for the creativity and inginuity, I learn so much from your threads.:))
 
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#9
Further work on the ball lift wheel, 215 teeth added to the outside diameter to drive a pair of fly's ( two for visual ballance) this is to controll the lift rate, and the two small drive gears made.
I intend this to be a very active clock, with things moving all the time.


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Slowly Slowly Brian.

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dickr

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What type of plastic are you using ? Plexiglas, polycarbonate, or other. Do you think there would be a notable difference in them. Apparently there is not a consideration in wear even though a lot of movement in it. I ask because I'm about one third through a wood and Lexan gear clock. Gears cut but haven't had a chance to fit them yet. To many interruptions.
Anyway I sure oughta learn something here. Thanx Brian.

dickr
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#11
Hi Dickr
All the plastic I am using is from old boat windows and hatches, so all I can say is that the gears that are taking the drive are from a unbreakable plastic, Gears that will only drive the hands are made from a plastic that will break if you score it deeply first,
Sorry to be so vague but it's all just a big fun project at the moment, If it all works I may do plans for it, but that's a long way off.
Good luck with your clock ,longing to se some pics.

Brian
 

hman

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#12
All the plastic I am using is from old boat windows and hatches, so all I can say is that the gears that are taking the drive are from a unbreakable plastic, Gears that will only drive the hands are made from a plastic that will break if you score it deeply first
Just to assist you, here's a quick "rule of thumb" I learned several years ago for identifying and distinguishing between acrylic (brand names like Plexiglass, Perspex, etc.) and polycarbonate (brand names like Lexan, Hyzod, etc.). Look at the edge of the sheet. If it looks bright (white), then it's acrylic. If it looks dark gray or deep purple, it's polycarbonate. That's assuming it's not otherwise colored. As a general rule, the only colored sheet plastics I've run into so far are acrylic. But there may well be colored polycarbonates as well.

Acrylic plastic is the one you noted that will break along a scored line. It's relatively resistant to many solvents, but will dissolve quickly in chlorinated solvents and somewhat more slowly acetone. These solvents can be used to "weld" pieces of acrylic together.

Polycarbonate is the "unbreakable" one. As a trade-off, it's not as dimensionally stable as acrylic. And be very careful with solvents. Alcohol is OK, but its surface finish will be instantly ruined if it comes in contact with acetone.

Just looking at the "colors" of the gears in your photos, I'd say that all of them except the "first" 200-tooth one you show (the one with the small holes) are polycarbonate. The "first" 200-tooth looks like it's acrylic. How close am I?

Hope this is of some interest/assistance.

Beautiful work!
 
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#13
Spot on John, thank's for the info.

It may be worth mentioning that. the parts made so far have nothing to do with the "Timekeeping" The gears just return the ball to the top of the inclined plane, and count the number of cycles (once every 30 seconds)that it takes for the ball to roll to the bottom.

I am also thinking of fitting Roman chimes to the clock. Roman chimes use 2 bells, a low chime for number five, and a high chime for number one, so 6 will be one low and one high.

We will see. Brian.
 
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