A THIRD GoldWing!

jonesn7

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The winter 19-20 project is now in the garage. 1979 GL1000 that had gone through a period with full Vetters and then a poor rendition of a cafe with 7/8" pipe clamped in each handle bar clamp. A chunk of foam (no seat pan) for a seat. Lucked out and gathered most of the missing parts pretty quick. This is my first project bike that actually ran (although very poorly and pouring fuel out of the carbs) when I got it home. It does have ~2 year-old tires and a licely coated tank. All plastic is there although one side cover is broken (I have spares). Missing a muffler, but I have a fairly good '78-'79 left from the Hunley build.

Right now, the carbs are apart for thorough cleaning/rebuild along with the rear brake system. After they are back I will do the front brakes (at a minimum swap the calipers back to the correct sides) and front forks.

Oh yes, I've already changed the belts - before it was ever rolled over!

 

jonesn7

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Yes. And, being an interference flat-four, you really don't want a belt to break!
Up until 2001 (the GL1800) all GoldWings were interference boxers. GL1000, 1100, and1200 were 4s, 1500 (and 1800s) flat 6. Many other things since '75 haven't changed - gas tank under the seat, boxer engine, shaft drive, two front one rear disk brakes, low maintenance (except for the points on the 1000s, which can be replaced with electronic.) Common to see 300k mile 'wings. Late '80 through '09 ('10 model) were built in Ohio.
 
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Janderso

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They are great motors, smooth as glass especially the 6 cylinders and run forever.
I had BMW Boxer motors, I love a boxer.
 

markba633csi

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Two wheeled Japanese land yacht --all they needed was auto-steer and auto lane centering :)
I had a Honda 750 but always wondered what those were like
 

jonesn7

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Two wheeled Japanese land yacht --all they needed was auto-steer and auto lane centering :)
I had a Honda 750 but always wondered what those were like
Well, maybe Japanese designed, but mine was built in Ohio, about 50 miles from where I was born. More USA-sourced parts than HD of the time.

The early GL1000s were actually envisioned as sportbikes, to compete with Z1 Kawasakis. When Honda saw everyone hanging Vetters and luggage and touring on them, they realized they had built a touring bike and began de-tuning the engine. '80 they brought production to USA and began selling them with bodywork (Interstate model). 1984 was the final year the Standard (neked) was available.
 

markba633csi

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Interesting- did they make the frames and engines here? I thought they just assembled them here
 

jonesn7

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There are videos filmed in Maysville of a GL1800 build. Frame welding, engine assembly, painting. Some parts may come from Japan (forks for most all including HD, wiring harneses for all vehicles from Mexico), but most is NA origin until 2009 when they shut it down and built 2012s in Japan.
 

jonesn7

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Finished carb clean, rebuild, PO repair (hopefully fixed more than I broke) of wrong jets, missing float valve filters, stripped threads, wallowed JIS heads, shuffled float bowls. Leak tested with isopropyl, fixed the one leaky float seat (just needed a polish), let it set 24 hours and leak-free. Drained and awaiting some pretty-work on the intake runners. Rear bake rebuild kits are in and I'll start that next. Seriously considering reassembly after brakes are sorted to use it for a daily driver while weather is good. This would point out any problems that need addressed when weather turns cold (and the 1800 returns to DD duty).
 

jonesn7

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Hit a snag when I discovered that the beautiful SS headers do not permit use of the Honda mufflers. Awaiting communications with several that say they have stock '78-'79 headers. Took the rear wheel off to permit easier muffler mounting so cleaned and reapplied moly on the splines. The ignition is now wired for the points and static timed. I also have modules and connectors now for the Ford TFI mod that I want to try.
 

Tom1948

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Back in '75 I worked for Honda. Rumor was they ran 148mph. on a Japanese test track. I had one myself in '77. I put an electric fuel pump on mine. It made cold starting a lot easier. There are a couple of good sites explaining that mod. A guy on the net called Randak (? spelling) is a real Guru on those things. He sells a lot of upgrades for those old wings. Those carbs can be tricky, unlike other import carbs. and he explains it all quite well. Check him out.......Tom
 

jonesn7

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Randakk (Randal Kennedy, I believe). I've absorbed his hints as well as Mike Nixons. And Pistol Pete lives about ten miles away from me. There are also two great forums dedicated to the old fat girls. Randakk actually sold the business, but the buyer appears to maintain the same quality. My carbs are finished and reassembled, but I'm waiting for headers so I can mount the mufflers before testing. Rear brakes all complete, but I need to order a new front reservoir as the old one is leaking. This has the rectangular reservoir like the '79 CB750F.
 

Tom1948

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I guess your on top of it all. I sold mine just about a year ago. I no longer ride, but i kind of keep my hand in it as I am building a Kawasaki engine for my son. It will be a 1428cc engine that he will drag race in the super comp. class. That's an 8.90 index.
 

Tozguy

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Tom, the 1428 cc sounds exciting, any chance that you might send a picture or two our way
 

Tom1948

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Right now its a matter of rounding up and cleaning parts. Its based on the Kawasaki 1000 engine but with a big bore kit stretching it to 1428. I raced one like it back in the mid 80's and yes when i get some parts together i will post pics.
 

jonesn7

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Is that the Kaw 1000 that was on so many police bikes? Never could figure out why they dropped that one. I understand retired motor officers have a strong affinity to them.
 

Tom1948

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Yes its the same basic engine. I dont know why they dropped that one either. It got its start back in 1973 and I believe they made them till 2005. In the motorcycle racing game the Kawasaki 1000 is what the 350 Chevy is.
 

Tozguy

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I drove a 1999 ZRX1100 for a few years and absolutely loved the engine.
 

Tom1948

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Very smooth powerful engine. I am amazed how the Canadians ride all year long. Most of the riders in the U.S. are only fair weather riders. My hats off to y'all.
 

Tozguy

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The only Canadians that I know who ride year round spend the winter in Florida.:)
My road riding season up here usually started in April and ended in October. Of course ice racing is a different story.
 

jonesn7

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We ride year-round here in Tennessee. Only ice/snow on the road stops us. New Years' tradition of a ride to Cumberland Falls. My favorite "Tail of the Dragon" times are January/February. Heated gloves and jacket liner are easy on the 1500 Watt electrical system. Now, this hot steamy weather sucks behind the GL1800 fairing, which is one reason for fixibg up the neked '79 for a summertime daily driver.
 

jonesn7

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Still waiting for headers (guy I bought them from shipped them to the wrong person). Should be in early next week. Recovered the '75-77 seat that I bought in Georgia (really like how it looks now).


Rebuilt the right front fork leg from the junker '79 that I stripped down for parts. It will replace the project's right fork that has a bad ding in the tube right where the seals wear. All wiring is complete (hopefully). Tank has been pumped dry. No rust in it - it has been coated with a beige colored product (not Kreem, hopefully) that seems intact, plus they made up new pickups in it. Front master (and maybe calipers) need rebuilt/repaired/replaced. A little spongy and a slight weep from the bottom of the MC reservoir. I'll drain and flush the front system, and when I do I'll pull the reservoir. Hopefully it is the o-ring, which I can replace with one made from o-ring cord stock.

Next step is header and muffler install though. Holding off on rear wheel install until that is done. Which holds back the front end work as I can't move it from where it is. Might make up a plug-and-play kit for using Ford TFI modules triggered by the points to fire the coils. That's about all I can figure to do until I get the headers in. Already sold and shipped the SS headers.
 
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aliva

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I know im going to get flak for this but is this a machining forum or a motorcycle forum?
 

FOMOGO

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As you predicted.... There are all kinds of sub-forums here, and I at least, enjoy seeing what others are up to besides, and in conjunction with machining. If your not interested, no one is forcing you to look at that, or any particular post, just pass it by. Mike
 

jonesn7

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So far, the '79 has not required any machining. The Hunley did, however. Things like one unobtainium pivot thrust washer that a PO left out. the existing one seems to be phenolic, and since I don;t have a piece that big, I made one of brass. The belt idlers were seriously rusted, so I made new ones with bearings, the original pivot, a nyloc nut holding the bearing on a bolt machined down to fit the pivot arm.

Yesterday I made new hinge pins for the shelter sides on tge '79 out of 80mm x 5mm screws by drilling holes for tiny pins and trimming their length. I just have the smallest HF tools, but they really help.

So, the carb problem on #2 cylinder fouling pkugs on Hunley was finally tracked down to a wallowed-out needle jet. I had spare good ones from a junker '79 so that is fixed, tested, and I'm real happy with it.

'79 carbs in place and rewired with stock ignition. Finally got stock headers on it so the mufglers would mount and rolled it out. Fired right up and even though just static timed and carbs not balanced, it sounded real good! Went ahead and registered it, but still need to finish forks and rebuild front brake system before riding. I hate working on brakes.
 

jonesn7

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Just an update on The '79 (Freedom).

I've rebuilt the forks replacing one tube with a spare from the junker and polishing the lower legs. Both front calipers pulled apart and cleaned and lines flushed with brake cleaner. MC rebuilt and new reservoir. Was surprised how fast and easy to fill and bleed with MightyVac. Went through some of the electrical connectors and cleaned/tightened, even replaced one shell. Rebuilt carb rack is close enough that I'm planning to back it out tomorrow for strobe timing and then carb balance. She is now registered, and insurance starts tomorrow.

Used the lathe to spin the brake pistons with ScotchBrite and brake cleaner to polish them up. The shelter side pins I made work real nice. One nice thing about having some machine tools when working on bikes is that you can make special tools. Like the drift that I made for removing emulsion tubes from the carbs. Very easy too damage the tapered tube tip without a nice drift with a matching female taper drift to drive it out.
 

jonesn7

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Well, she is now on-the-road! A little clutch adjustment (and swapping clutch link plate in from junker to avoid scraping off 1/4" orange RTV a PO had smeared on it), valve adjustment (half hour spent removing silicone sealant from valve cover gasket), and swaping tach drive that had leaky shaft seal (once again, a PO had tried sealing with silicone), and she runs quite well. Have not worked on appearance, but did mount a luggage rack on the back as they are always very handy. Also changed to a set of bars with only ~4" rise (a $5 Barber swap meet pick up) because the stock Honda bars always hurt my back.

She starts and runs well, front brakes are great and rears bedding in nicely. Transmission shifts smoother than my '06 1800. Swapped-in shocks are working well, but I need to pull and clean them. A PO lined the tank, and has it so the reserve pickup is the only one working. I'll work on that later and do some calibration to fuel gauge. A wire had been added to manually run the fan but was just dangling. I've added a connector and grounded line to plug it in to should that be needed. So far the temperature stays right at the good operating point so the thermostat is working, and I've not had it reach high enough to cycle the fan on.

Considering experiment with Ford TFI modules this winter. I have modules and connectors, just need to make heat sinking mounts and harnesses. The charging system is working well, with 3500 RPM voltage ~14 on a little digital voltmeter that is presently taped to the shelter. I like this little LED meter so much that I'm considering swapping it with the Honda bimetalic meter that is 1 volt off and very slow.
 

jonesn7

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Ford TFI module experiment is so far a success! Mounted under the left shelter on aluminum plates with aluminum shower door rails as fins. Wired to male and female 6 pin plugs that plug into the coil interface of the '78-'79 junction box. Unplug the condensers and go. No timing change needed. Doesn't really seem to be changing the way the bike runs, either. Modules are triggered by the points and coil firing/charging/dwell controlled by the modules. Ballast resistor is bypassed by the plug-in, so all that is needed to go back to points only is swap the plugs and plug in the condensers. After a 20 mile run last night, the TFIs were not even warm.
 

Winegrower

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Just to combine the motorcycle and machining concepts, I have a Honda ST1100 that developed a problem with the side stand. To fix it I needed to machine a custom shaped bolt that compensated for the wear in the pivot point. That was one of my first "productive" lathe projects.

BTW, no bike shop anywhere near me would touch this...the wear was in the frame, and that would have needed some welding and rework. Maybe I could have found a welding shop who could have done it, but it was a good project for my shop.
 
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