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A Vertical Slide For A 9x20 Lathe

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savarin

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My first vertical slide was a bit small in what it could hold so I have decided to build a larger one.
It should look something like this (but not in these colours:grin big:)
vertical-slide-model.jpg
I faced and edged a chunk of hot rolled scrap for the front plate.
I will drill and thread a matrix of holes in this for a variety of mountings.
facing-slide-block.jpg
All four edges were also faced off in a similar manner and ended up within 0.001" of square on all sides and faces. It took a couple of attempts to get it this good.
edging-slide-block.jpg
the next job was to soak the 12mm plates for the angle and swivel plate in vinegar to remove the mill scale, 48 hours and it was cooked to perfection, a bit safer than hydrochloric acid.
vinegar-soak.jpg
The first mistake was to bore the plate for the swivel shaft too large, Doh! never mind, I just knurled the shaft to make it a tight fit. You can just see it there.
The worst part was how I managed to make it too large.
The shaft is 20mm, I turned down one end to 15mm which is where I wanted to fit the shaft.
I used the calipers to measure the shaft then checked that against some imperial drills, the first one I tried was larger than the set caliper gap so I said to myself - " no worries I can bore it out that little extra bit."
I have absolutely no idea why I thought this, definitely a senior moment.
I cut a large counter sink for extra weld holding. This side will eventually be faced flat.
shaft-fit.jpg
First side welded but forgot to take a photo.
Second side to be deep welded.
weld1.jpg
I cut the corners off the circle with the angle grinder first to make it easier to turn round.
faced.jpg
I decided to turn it between centres to ensure the disk had parallel sides.
and that the shaft was at right angles.
faced-both-sides-and-shaft.jpg
I have decided to add a degree scale on the outside. I have no idea if this is worthwhile but it will look good.
To this end I have printed a degree scale onto a sheet of paper and stuck it to some stainless plate.
I will use this in the end of the main spindle to index the wheel.
degree-disk1.jpg
This is printed at two degree intervals as I think one degree intervals will be a bit too close.
This site is an excellent source for printed scales
http://www.cgtk.co.uk/metalwork/reference/divider
I've run out of thin cutting disks so have to wait a bit before I can cut it out and lacquer it.
It is the same size as the face plate so I hope to be able to actually turn the what will be a rough cut edge smooth.
 

savarin

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The stainless sheet is an unknown freebie.
Its 1.9mm thick and damned hard.
I had to resort to the "Bench" shears
bench-shear2.jpg
I made a quick mandrel to chuck it up to skim the edge'
degree-disk2.jpg
A complete waste of time, nothing would touch it. I had to resort to a file and hope.
Eventually it was done and I could mount it on the lathe using an expanding mandrel
Made a pointer, used a "G" clamp and steel chunk as a saddle stop (removed here) and worked my way around the disk,
re-adjusted the stop and went round again to extend the whole numbers.
Each division is 2 degrees.
It was pretty quick considering, about 30 mins total.
BUT..... What a dork! in my rush to get this done I marked the wrong edge, guess I will have to make a pointer instead of the mark I was going to use.
scale.jpg
 
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I have made that same mistake of marking the wrong edge. I just remachine the edge and mark it correctly if you can have it about .015" undersized.
 

savarin

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My brain must be turning to mush I cant believe I never thought of that :chagrin::laughing:
thanks Mark.
 
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savarin

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Started to face the angle plate with the large fly cutter
facing-angle-plate.jpg

Took 3 passes to get this far
ready-to-bore.jpg
The top right corner didnt get touched but that will be cut off any way and the bottom right corner will be filed flat. Again it doesnt matter as its only cosmetic (but it still hurts)
I bored out the centre using a drill in the lathe spindle then had to mount a milling cutter very slightly off set in the 4 jaw to get the hole exactly to size.

bored-for-degree-wheel.jpg
The shaft the other side still has to be threaded for an 18mm nut to clamp the degree disk to the angle plate, then I can cut the shaft off this side.
The blue part has to be trimmed down to the graduated disk.
The shaft protruding from the disk will be removed next.
 

Eddyde

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Looks good! Perhaps you can add a vernier scale to get divisions below the 2 degree marks?
 

savarin

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I must be honest Eddy I dont really know if the degrees are worth while but thought it would look good.
I hadnt thought about a vernier scale, I will have to read up on how to do it and even more - how to read one.
 

savarin

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A wee bit more done today.
Milled the curve in the angle plate to match the degree wheel.
I made a temp mandrel to hold the angle plate on the and turned it by hand.
curve-milling.jpg

I cut most of the excess off with an angle grinder, milled it then resorted to the file to finish. Still needs a bit more smoothing.
curved-top1.jpg
You will notice Mark that I didnt re cut the scale (lazy sod) I will make a little brass pointer to also hide some of the rough marks.
 

savarin

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In my usual clumsy manner I broke a tap in the main block.
This required re winding the eroder coil.
Done that and have commenced to burn the broken tap out.
This pic shows the burner in operation but I've lowered the flushing oil (kero) to show up.
sparking.jpg
 

savarin

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Burnt the tap out, took a bit of work to chip out the remaining threads but ended up with the original threaded hole un damaged. Just had to run the tap through to clean it up.
Whilst the eroder was burning I milled the flats on the nut.
Many thanks to Tony for kicking me in the butt, I re-assembled the small vertical slide as its accurate enough for this job.
milling-the-nut.jpg

the nut in place, worth $20 of any ones money.
milled-nut.jpg

Then I went on to mill out the slot in the slide block.
Phew, this chattered like mad but worked.
milling-the-block-out.jpg
This is half way through so now I have to flip it to finish the other side.
 

savarin

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Back from holiday for a week before I could scrounge some shed time.
Still it was worth it as I got a fair bit done today.
Finished all the milling and tapping in that damned block. I broke 2 more 4mm taps so I re drilled and tapped them all for 5 mm instead of 4 mm.
The eroder worked overtime and I found that it actually constricted the centre of the coil causing it to slow from friction. I turned down the armature to get more freedom and the speed virtually doubled and the coil didnt get as hot.
A win win situation, just trying to find a bright spot from all the broken taps:laughing:

Here is the finished block bolted to the pivot plate with all those cursed threaded holes.
block.jpg

As I needed a plate for the slide to er slide on I had to cut some 10mm plate down so I faced one edge for a datum line
edging-the-plate.jpg
Then I could cut the excess off with the angle grinder and use this flat edge butted to the chuck to finish the cut side parallel. (which turned out to be the case)
edging-the-plate-2.jpg
Next it was the ends turn, hmm a fair bit of overhang but slow and gently and I ended up with the ends at exact (as best as I could measure) right angles.
edging-the-plate-3.jpg
Then of course it had to be faced off. Simple
edging-the-plate-4.jpg
I used a bolt turned to a point to make registration marks, drilled and bolted one, adjusted and marked and drilled a second diametrically opposite and bolted up before marking all the others.
It worked and they all lined up
test-fit.jpg
Holes drilled and bolted onto the degree wheel and block.
Now I really have to decide upon whether to keep it as a gingery style gib or cut the 60' angles for a dovetail.
Dovetails will require the assistance of a mates mill that in this case I cant avoid as there is insufficient cross slide travel to cut them in my lathe.
It will end up with a fair bit of overhang that I'm hoping can be improved with the use of a machinists jack.
 

savarin

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Finished drilling and tapping 33 holes in the main plate for a variety of fittings.
The 8mm sets of three holes are for the jaws, the 6mm holes along each edge are for clamps to hold a small engineers vice
threaded-block.jpg
Just for a grin I went back and faced it with a shearing bit. Thats a lot of fine swarf.
shearing-bit.jpg
It left a better finish that I started with but the centre was a bit smeared.
The bottom jaw is drilled and sized, the top jaw for the vice is tomorrows job.
 

Randall Marx

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Looking good. I've been enjoying reading through your progress and seeing how you overcome what might be considered to be a lack of equipment. Thank you for sharing your journey with us!
 

savarin

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Thanks for the kind words Randall. much appreciated.
 

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You have a great can do knack , your work with just a small hobby lathe shows the talent you have as a machinist. Good job
 

savarin

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Thanks guys, most appreciated.
BUT! I am only an old chef who definitely can not be called a machinist, I would call it "Seat of the pants fabricating"
Not having been shown how to do the right thing I just plough ahead and give it a try, doesnt always work though.
 

savarin

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Just spent three days adjusting the tail stock to get as perfect as I could straight cut over a 250mm length.
This will be for the lead screw.
I managed to get it down to 0.00017" difference from one end to the other (Translated from my mm micrometer)
I though this was as good as it gets, but, the middle was about 0.0008" fatter.
I did all this between centres turning some 20mm dia unknown steel down to 10mm (it was bright and shiny on the outside)
Turning this unknownium was a real ***** as it kept tearing and producing a very rough surface, worse than hot rolled mild steel, so I experimented with differing grinds, speeds and feeds till I ended up cutting almost at the slowest the lathe would turn and a very very slow feed. This produced an acceptable finish.
In an attempt to remove the fatter central section I tried a travelling steady.
What a pita these are, but it sort of improved it slightly (guess I need a lot more practice here)
Now its cutting nicely I reduced the bar to its final dia of 10mm and proceeded to single point the 1mm thread.
ARGH, I set the gear box to 6 instead of 7, good job it was just the scratch cut, reset to the correct number and started cutting (with the travelling steady set)
I ended up with the most horrendous thread I have ever seen or cut myself.
There were nice sections, fat sections, sections with torn thread crests and every other stuffup you can imagine in that 200mm length of thread.
I'm sure this is the same steel I used for the indexing wheel above and that thread was single point cut and is excellent.
Back to square one on this.
 

HBilly1022

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It absolutely AMAZES me what you do with an "Asian 9x20, some rusty files and a hammer". I've had my Asian 10 x 20 lathe for about a year now and I think I'm just starting to figure out how much I need to learn. Then I see your posts and I know there is hope. However I never expect to get to your level. You produce some incredible work and I don't see how it would turn out any better using an expensive lathe.

I know what you mean about turning the same piece of steel with different results. Just when you think you have it figured out and your getting a nice finish, something changes and it all goes for a ****. This is the one thing I struggle with the most. It keeps things interesting and frustrating but we will overcome.

EDIT, I just thought of something. If you are cutting threads and using the following steady, could that cause distortion because the steady is riding on the threads and pushing the work piece back and forth (up and down) as it rides on the threads? I guess it depends on the contact surface area. If the contact is pointed then it would follow the threads, if it was over a longer length, it would follow the surface (tops) of the threads.

I'm not experienced so I could be out in left field on this.
 
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savarin

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If you are cutting threads and using the following steady, could that cause distortion because the steady is riding on the threads and pushing the work piece back and forth (up and down) as it rides on the threads? I guess it depends on the contact surface area. If the contact is pointed then it would follow the threads, if it was over a longer length, it would follow the surface (tops) of the threads.
Yep, I assumed it would ride over the crests and prevent the thread from being pushed away from the bit.
I hated using it as it seems like a bit of a cludge and the fingers definitely wore away a tad.
I used a file to remove any sharp bits that may have been left after every cut in the hope that would have helped.
 

savarin

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Had a better day today.
I cleaned up the horrible thread with a small triangular file till it fit, its still horrible with torn bits but it does work and as the section it screws into has a long thread its actually quite smooth in action much to my surprise.
At least I now have real measurements to make a new one from. (gotta look on the bright side.
lead-screw-2.jpg

All screwed up, the top aluminium section with the bearings will bolt to the top of the plate with all the mounting holes.
lead-screw-1.jpg
The small top hat section clamps to the centre of the top roller bearing and will have a round dial marked in 1/10's with a friction sliding fit so if I need to be accurate with the slides movement I can.
The handle (when I can decide upon a shape) will be pinned to the top of the top hat and held with the dome nut.
Now back to the gibbs.
 
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savarin

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Next to set out the holes for the top bracket.
I set all the parts up and used c/sunk screws to hold the slide plate in the correct position as the gibbs are not ready yet.
The centre bolt was turned to a point and the top bracket lowered via the lead screw, aligned and a mark made.
Drill, remove the point and move to the next hole, use the bolt to align and repeat till all three are done

bearings-setup-1.jpg

The top hat shape then had a couple of grooves added for "O" rings to add a tight friction fit to the knurled scale.
Each division is 1/10 of a millimetre movement.
o-rings.jpg
The movement is nice and smooth and the scale turns with the screw but can be manually set to the number.
Those three bolts pass down into the main slide block.
top-view.jpg

side-view.jpg

front-view.jpg

Hopefully if I'm allowed some shed time its the handle tomorrow.
I'm a tad concerned about the amount of metal hanging out from the cross slide so I may have to add some extra support once in place but am unsure how at this moment in time.
 

savarin

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or some reason this post disappeared into the aether so I try again.
I was going to pin the top hat section to the shaft when I suddenly realised that the scale ring would prevent that DOH!
So I made a small cutter to broach out a keyway.
keycut1.jpg
Flipped the broach over to key the shaft
keycut2.jpg
I suppose I could have continued the keyway along the threaded portion to key the handle as well but decided to use three pins instead.
The handle is a rescue from another old project and as the ball end wouldn't unscrew I had to keep the length so I could grip it in the chuck as I didnt want to mar the shiny ball.
The disk was again a scrap that I drilled out five holes and knurled the edge. The small brass key was cut from a sheet and filed to size.
handle-bits.jpg

All back together and works very smoothly with the c/sunk screws instead of gibb strips. Almost to the point of just using those, but I wont.
handle-on.jpg

Now I just need some time to arrange the friends mill to finish the gibbs.
 

savarin

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Gibbs and dovetail milled, assembled with "G" clamps and it works.
Only had an hour free so that was all I managed to do today.
 

rwm

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That's amazing. Awesome fabricating.
Robert
 

savarin

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As the side without the adjusting screws had room to access the 6mm through threaded holes I used them to fix that dovetail.
A bit over the top maybe but no threading to do.
first-gibb.jpg

I'm not so lucky on the other side with the brass gibb strip as it occludes part of the existing holes.
You can see the six screws at the top of the unit.
The photo makes the dovetail that the brass is against look vertical but its actually cut at 30 degrees.
I will drill and tap new fixing holes between the existing holes but only halfway through the block at 5mm.
I guess this is what happens when the main drawings are just carried in your head.:bang head:

second-gibb.jpg
 

Downunder Bob

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Nice job Savarin, you do some nice work, hard to believe your not formally trained. How long have you been self learning. It's quite amazing what you can make with just a lathe and a lot of ingenuity. you also have the advantage of not having been taught what can't or shouldn't be done, something I've had to unlearn when faced with that impossible job, learning to think outside the box is very useful at times.

Bob
 

savarin

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Nice job Savarin, you do some nice work, hard to believe your not formally trained. How long have you been self learning. It's quite amazing what you can make with just a lathe and a lot of ingenuity. you also have the advantage of not having been taught what can't or shouldn't be done, something I've had to unlearn when faced with that impossible job, learning to think outside the box is very useful at times.

Bob
Thanks Bob, Ive been making "stuff" all my life from a very early age with mecanno and other construction sets. I can visualise most things in 3d I just needed some basic tools to fabricate what I wanted.
This is my first lathe so I now have three years of basic machining experience that includes some monumental stuff ups but thats what learning is all about.
I used to tell my students that they can do anything, they just have to think first then have a go.
It didnt matter if it didnt work as they would still learn heaps. I try to live by this mantra.
 

Downunder Bob

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My first vertical slide was a bit small in what it could hold so I have decided to build a larger one.
It should look something like this (but not in these colours:grin big:)
View attachment 134262
I faced and edged a chunk of hot rolled scrap for the front plate.
I will drill and thread a matrix of holes in this for a variety of mountings.
View attachment 134260
All four edges were also faced off in a similar manner and ended up within 0.001" of square on all sides and faces. It took a couple of attempts to get it this good.
View attachment 134257

Interesting, one of the first things we were taught at trade school was to face a hunk of steel on all sides and edges, keeping it square and flat. I see you've learned the process well. We eventually finished up with an engineer's "C" clamp, making all the parts by various processes.

the next job was to soak the 12mm plates for the angle and swivel plate in vinegar to remove the mill scale, 48 hours and it was cooked to perfection, a bit safer than hydrochloric acid.
View attachment 134263
The first mistake was to bore the plate for the swivel shaft too large, Doh! never mind, I just knurled the shaft to make it a tight fit. You can just see it there.
The worst part was how I managed to make it too large.
The shaft is 20mm, I turned down one end to 15mm which is where I wanted to fit the shaft.
I used the calipers to measure the shaft then checked that against some imperial drills, the first one I tried was larger than the set caliper gap so I said to myself - " no worries I can bore it out that little extra bit."
I have absolutely no idea why I thought this, definitely a senior moment.
I cut a large counter sink for extra weld holding. This side will eventually be faced flat.
View attachment 134261
First side welded but forgot to take a photo.
Second side to be deep welded.
View attachment 134264
I cut the corners off the circle with the angle grinder first to make it easier to turn round.

About time you got a bandsaw, that poor angle grinder does way too much cutting work. I recently got a Hafco Metalmaster BS-5V Bandsaw, Widely available in Aus. very happy with it, they have a range of models around that size.


View attachment 134258
I decided to turn it between centres to ensure the disk had parallel sides.
and that the shaft was at right angles.
View attachment 134259
I have decided to add a degree scale on the outside. I have no idea if this is worthwhile but it will look good.


To this end I have printed a degree scale onto a sheet of paper and stuck it to some stainless plate.
I will use this in the end of the main spindle to index the wheel.
View attachment 134256
This is printed at two degree intervals as I think one degree intervals will be a bit too close.
This site is an excellent source for printed scales
http://www.cgtk.co.uk/metalwork/reference/divider
I've run out of thin cutting disks so have to wait a bit before I can cut it out and lacquer it.
It is the same size as the face plate so I hope to be able to actually turn the what will be a rough cut edge smooth.
 

Downunder Bob

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Thanks Bob, Ive been making "stuff" all my life from a very early age with mecanno and other construction sets. I can visualise most things in 3d I just needed some basic tools to fabricate what I wanted.
This is my first lathe so I now have three years of basic machining experience that includes some monumental stuff ups but thats what learning is all about.
I used to tell my students that they can do anything, they just have to think first then have a go.
It didnt matter if it didnt work as they would still learn heaps. I try to live by this mantra.
I can relate very well to that, I remember as a kid building quite a large crane with meccano, and the jib collapsed because it was not stiff enough, I learned a lot about mechanics from that and other projects.

I also find it easy to visualise in 3D, and even though tech drawing was my best subject in trade school I have always built most things from the image in my head, rarely ever bothering with a drawing.

You say your lathe is asian 9x20 does it have a brand, is it Chinese or Taiwanese?

I just got my first lathe 12 x 16 and am still setting it up. It's the first time I've been near a lathe or anything bigger than an angle grinder, for over 20 years, So I actually have a re-learning curve ahead of me. While I still remember much of what I knew, it's the fine touch of hands on the controls that I have to re-learn.

Stuff ups of any size is the core of learning, we always learn more from mistakes, than from successes. You are so very correct when you say just think of it first and give it a go,

What did you teach?
 
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