A Very Inexpensive Way To Sharpen Brazed Carbide Lathe Cutters

Bamban

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ironhorse18

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Of course this post has been up here for a few and I'm glad I found it. I recently bought my first set of carbide insert tools and have been a little reluctant to "stick 'em in the machine" and give them a go. After reading these post I feel more confident on there proper use.
I just bought my second lathe a South Bend CL 175 c, 13" I hope it will spin fast enough for these carbide insert cutters.
Thank you to all for the good information.

ironhorse18
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Jidis

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Thanks all from me too for the info in this thread. I've been trying to improve my sharpening skills lately and just built a new workstation/cabinet for my grinder with two nice slotted tool rests. Been thinking about some sort of diamond wheel setup myself, but my needs are more for carbide-tipped router bits. I'm noticing a bad habit I have of using dull ones and my "slide them along the edge of a diamond sharpener a few times" method is too random and proving to be ineffective.

I was thinking that maybe some sort of collet block in my mini mill vise would force them to land at a perfect 180° when you flipped the block over, and put you at the same spot on the opposite flute. Then you could bring a wheel down like the OP does, or slide the table across one with the feed wheels. Has anybody rigged up something similar for when multiple matching flutes are involved?

Thanks!
 

Janderso

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Great ideas, I wish I was more creative! I like to see all the hf adaptations that save money and work well.
 

aefriot

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I know I'm new here and don't want to make anyone uncomfortable because they didn't think of it sooner, but if you are sharpening lathe tooling and are looking for something to turn the diamond or carbide sharpening discs or stones...you probably have a tool to do just that already. Your lathe has adjust adjustable speeds, right? Just turn a mandrel to hold your disc or stone and put it in your lathe! Most probably you have the vices or tool holders to get the correct angles for your cutting edge.

Please tell me if I am wrong or that the lathe shouldn't be used for such a procedure. It's something you already have. It won't take up more room on your bench or in your cabinets. It probably has good lighting and gives you another reason to depress the power switch to hear the motor turn! Maybe, just maybe you could even make another jig to hold your dull saw blades and another to hold your router/shaper bits. I have always thought lathes were so handy. I cannot wait to finally get started seriously using mine!
 

markba633csi

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I would be concerned about abrasive dust getting in and on the lathe, could cause rapid wear. Drill press or dedicated motor is better
Mark
 

aefriot

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AH! I knew I would benefit from joining this site! Cuttings from metals are much larger and are less likely to make their way into crevices where they may not get cleaned. You would think I would have learned this from my machining on the beach days. Small abrasives get everywhere and takes the fun out of machining.

Thank you! Another lesson reminded.
 
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