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Advice on Emco Maximat V10 -P

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Firewood

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Hi there, this is my first post other than introduction. I've been looking to buy a lathe and/or mill for a while now and it seems like any of the ones I am interested in get snatched up real quick (A few weeks ago I missed out on a good deal on an Atlas because I was away for a wedding!).

Right now there is an Emco Maximat V10-p that just got posted for sale. I live in a place that never saw much along the lines of the metal industry so machinery is few and far between. I'm looking for some guidance on this machine (or warnings if it is not a good machine to get into or start out with). What I have found out so far is:
-There are fibre gears that are designed to be a sacrificial weak point that should be inspected (I believe you have to unscrew a plate on the top?)
-The motor direction/speed/on/off switch is problematic and expensive to replace
-Spare parts are hard to find and expensive

On the plus side, it appears to have the mill attachment and my understanding is the green ones are a stronger 6 speed variant, and newer, than the blue models which were a 4 speed and slightly lighter duty. Its hard to find good information on these machines, especially for someone who is green as grass to machinery.

Its kind of at the far end of my price range especially because it doesn't include tooling. The want over $2000 Canadian pesos from what I can tell it only comes with a 3 jaw chuck and stand.

If I could get some direction on what to look for to gauge its condition I would be very grateful!
 

mikey

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Firewood, I do not have, nor have I even seen a V-10-P. I do have an Emco Super 11 and have refurbished a Compact 8 and can say that they are superb machines. Before going further, let me link a "Handbook" from the Yahoo Emco Larger Lathes group that you should join if you buy this machine. Here's the link:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16f1qJO6IyKsYaG7cqB9ENW1RSm2ESB_gVwz-TQxSRJU/edit#

I presume you've read Tony Griffith's site but just in case, see this: http://www.lathes.co.uk/emco/page4.html

I am also attaching the Operator's Manual for the V10-P. This will give you an idea of how the lathe and milling attachment work. Emco always lists all the tooling available for that model of lathe so if they made it, you will find it in the manual.

Since Emco is totally committed to CNC nowadays, all support for their older manual machines is gone. If you need a part then the only option is to buy it on the used market; occasionally, you may be lucky enough to find a NOS part. Depending on the model, these parts can be easy or hard to find. Typically, you will see an entire lathe parted out on ebay and you'll be able to find what you need if you're vigilant. Do note that since parts are hard to get, the prices will be higher than any of us like.

In general, Emco lathes are really well made and to a pretty high standard. Since yours resides in North America, it should have an Imperial leadscrew but you should check. If you do end up with this lathe, find and obtain the complete change gear set. The V10-p did come with some fiber gears so the lathe must come to a full stop before switching gears; you would do this anyway, right?

One characteristic of Emco lathes, at least the larger ones to include the V10-P, is that the cross slide and compound can be adjusted to run with zero backlash - ZERO. This aids in accuracy and is a real pleasure to use.

It's hard to recommend a lathe sight unseen, much less one I haven't run myself or know everything about. You'll have to decide but, in general, Emco lathes are really good, really accurate and few seem to regret owning one. I would highly recommend you join the Emco Larger Lathes Yahoo group and discuss it further with them.


Mike
 

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Firewood

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Mike,

Thanks a lot for the in depth reply. Very useful information and I'm going to spend some time reading the info you provided me with. I am waiting to hear back from the seller but hopefully I can view it soon. I think I could scrape up a little extra money since getting a lathe and mill combo would be very useful. Thanks again for the info!
 

mikey

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Mike,

Thanks a lot for the in depth reply. Very useful information and I'm going to spend some time reading the info you provided me with. I am waiting to hear back from the seller but hopefully I can view it soon. I think I could scrape up a little extra money since getting a lathe and mill combo would be very useful. Thanks again for the info!
I should mention that the milling attachment is good only for rudimentary milling. It works but the travel in Y is limited to what your cross slide has. Personally, I would tell the seller to keep the milling attachment and sell it separately, then drop the price on the lathe. You will be much happier and much better off having a stand alone milling machine.

The V10-P has a top speed of 2500 rpm and it'll get down to 60 rpm in low gear. Not too bad a speed range for a little 10" lathe. We have one locally for sale and if I didn't already have a Super 11, I might consider this one: https://honolulu.craigslist.org/oah/tls/d/emco-mill-lathe/6275886103.html

Anyway, I wish you the best of luck!
 

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I have a V10-P and really like it. I got a great deal at a garage sale. It had one stripped fiber gear which I replaced with a steel gear. The previous owner had never ran it because the lathe and mill had three phase motors. I put a VFD on it. I can say that the factory electrical controls are not that great but the lathe is well made and accurate. The mill has not been very useful to me as I have a Diamond horizontal mill that is much more rigid.
 

Firewood

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Thank you for the replies. The fellow that was firstt in line hasn't got back to him so I will hopefully be able to check it out before work.

To check out the fibre gears, my understanding is ther eis a plate on top with 4 screws and its as simple as removing the plate and rotating the lathe? How much can I expect to spend on replacing those gears either with fibre or steel/metal alloy?

Also it sounds like the motor may be missing or have damaged cooling fins, could someone eventure a guess on cost to repair or replace the motor? I am brand new to all this.

Thanks so much for the help! This is a great forum.
 

mikey

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Used motors come up from time to time. The main seller of used Emco parts is a fellow named "Iwasamiller". He responds to emails so contact him re parts. He has a motor right now that only works in low speed range for $60.00 - not sure what is wrong with it. If it was me, I would slap a 3-ph 1HP motor in it and use a VFD instead of looking for an original replacement.

I also do not know how much it costs for a metal replacement gear. He is selling those fiber gears for $150 each and I think it may be cheaper to use a metal gear. On the other hand, fiber gears are intended to protect the gear train so its your call.
 

den-den

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Yes, open the top and rotate the shafts while looking for damaged teeth.
I paid about $30 for a steel gear but had to bore it and face it to a reduce the width. I used the old lathe that I had before getting the Maximat to modify the gear. It was a metric gear but I don't remember the specs now. My Maximat has metric components but cuts Imperial threads (I don't believe this is true for all Maximat V10 models.)
 

Firewood

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Okay so good news and bad news.

Good news is got to look at it and he's holding for me while I think about it. It seems to rotate nice and smooth. It comes with a rotating table and an extra X Y vice to use with the milling machine.

Bad news is the motor for the milling machine doesn't work. It hums but doesn't spin and a few cooling fins are snapped off. I'm operating under the assumption the motor will need to be replaced. Also, the fibre gear on the left has sustained a bit of damage on the right side of it. I'll try to add a picture I took. I would love to hear if it's enough to expect a failure in the future or just clean it up? It also doesn't come with the centre for the tail side. I believe it's called the live centre?

Other than that I think it looks decent. The seller knows as much (or as little) as I do about machining haha. Which is none. He hasn't used it himself. There isn't any tooling with it but he said he'd take what would equal about $1450 USD.

Additional advice would be very appreciated!
 

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Firewood

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Additional pictures. I'm pretty excited, I would like to get it but am worried about cost of the live center and tooling. Lathes don't come up for sale very often here (other than the odd Grizzly or Asian made.
64706425_934.jpg 64706424_934.jpg 64706423_934.jpg 64706427_934.jpg
 

mikey

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Okay so good news and bad news.

Good news is got to look at it and he's holding for me while I think about it. It seems to rotate nice and smooth. It comes with a rotating table and an extra X Y vice to use with the milling machine.

Bad news is the motor for the milling machine doesn't work. It hums but doesn't spin and a few cooling fins are snapped off. I'm operating under the assumption the motor will need to be replaced. Also, the fibre gear on the left has sustained a bit of damage on the right side of it. I'll try to add a picture I took. I would love to hear if it's enough to expect a failure in the future or just clean it up? It also doesn't come with the centre for the tail side. I believe it's called the live centre?

Other than that I think it looks decent. The seller knows as much (or as little) as I do about machining haha. Which is none. He hasn't used it himself. There isn't any tooling with it but he said he'd take what would equal about $1450 USD.

Additional advice would be very appreciated!
That lathe will clean up nice, I think.

The fiber gear looks like the owner shifted the gears while the lathe was still running. The damage looks minimal and I suspect that if you are careful to let the lathe stop before shifting, it should hold up fine.

The mill motor can be replaced; watch ebay and one will turn up.

You should understand that accessorizing a lathe may cost as much or more than the machine itself costs. This is true for any lathe you buy. What is lacking is the steady and follow rests; these are important. Also important is the complete change gear set; no lathe is complete without it and eventually, you should try to obtain it. A live center is not overly expensive. You will eventually need a drill chuck for the tailstock and a quick change tool post. Otherwise, the lathe looks good.

$1400.00 for an Emco lathe is a decent price, especially one with a milling attachment on it. Do you own a dial test indicator? If so, remove the chuck and indicate the taper in the spindle. It should run with very little, if any, run out. Emco lathes are very precise machines and even the V10-P had a hardened and ground spindle that should be very accurate. If it run out significantly, then either the bearing preload needs to be adjusted (easily done) or the bearings need to be changed.

Also check to see if there is excessive wear in the ways. Visually look for damage; if none is found then tighten the saddle locking bolt on the right side of the saddle. It will be on top and if you look underneath there will be a plate. Move the saddle to the headstock end and snug that bolt until the carriage moves with just a little effort at the saddle handwheel. Then move the saddle toward the tailstock. If it moves with about the same effort then the bed is likely in good shape, but if it gets really tight as you move down the the ways are significantly worn. You can measure this but this simple check is enough.

If you find anything off, and assuming you want the machine, then use it to leverage the price down.
 

Firewood

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Thank you so much Mike. I really appreciate the time you have put in to helping me. I forgot to mention it does have a steady rest and I believe a back plate too. As of now I am leaning towards purchasing this lathe. I'm still learning what is interchangeable and what is more specific to lathes but as a complete beginner I think I can have fun with very basic gear and slowly add on to it. I will basically park it until I learn how to use it without damaging it and all that fun stuff. If I am not mistaken the tailstock is MT2 so any MT2 centers/chucks etc should fit?

I do have a dial indicator, but it is cheap and I don't have a base for it (its threaded for timing an injection pump) so I can't really check the run out but I will see if I can borrow one from a friend. Thanks again!

You previously mentioned adding a variable speed drive and a 3 phase motor. I'm only basically aware of how a VFD works, but does it somehow transform to 3phase? Because I only have access to single phase 110/220. If the motor for the mill needs full replacing, should I try for an original or aftermarket? VFD? Thanks again! I hope I am not wearing out your patience!
 

mikey

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We have some of the most knowledgeable guys re VFD's on this forum; @mksj and @JimDawson to name a few. Post a thread on the forum and they or one of the other electrical wizards will hopefully pitch in. The VFD will allow you to run a 3phase motor on 220v house current and gives you variable speed; it is the way to go if you change motors. As for the mill motor, if you can afford and fit a 3ph/VFD on it, that would be useful - variable speed, yeah!

Yup, any MT2 accessory will fit in the tailstock - drill chuck, live center, etc. Post for suggestions before buying and the guys will steer you straight.

It's good you have the steady rest. The follow rest is handy but the steady is what you will use the most. Grab anything he has for the lathe, even if you don't know what it is or how to use it. Emco parts are dear and anything you can grab will be useful.

I don't know what your plans are but if it was me, I would tear the bulk of the lathe down and clean/lube/repair it. You can leave the headstock alone but drain the oil and inspect everything carefully. I would take the saddle, cross slide and compound apart to clean and lube everything. While you're at all this, you can decide whether or not to repaint it or just put it back together and use it as is.

I can tell you one thing; Emco lathes are put together like a Swiss watch. Everything fits, everything is finished. You do not need to force anything; it will come apart easily and go back together easily. Nothing on an Emco lathe is like an Asian kit lathe and the parts breakdown manual is accurate - you can tear a lathe down and put it back together with just the parts manual. I did just that with most of my Super 11 CD and also with a Compact 8, just using the IPB manual. Any important adjustments are in the User's Manual. Simple, accurate, superb machines and very capable for their size. I'm sure @den-den will be an important asset to you as he owns one.

Oh, before I forget. The compound slides on an Emco lathe are very precise but the cross slide and longitudinal feeds are not as precise. In the future and if you keep this lathe, consider a DRO.

I would rather own your used V10-P than most Asian lathes ... but then, I'm sort of biased!

Welcome to HM and welcome to the slippery slope that is Hobby Machining!

EDIT: you need a dial test indicator to check the spindle run out inside the taper, not a dial indicator. Ask your friend for his DTI.
 
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extropic

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mikey has been taking great care of you.

I'll just pitch in my $0.02 worth.

The EMCO machines are well made for their purpose (light work). That isn't true of many hobby lathes (new or used).
New, they were relatively expensive so tended to be bought by more discerning users (fewer abusers).
Verify the main motor turns the spindle in all the available RPM ranges and the bearings/gears don't sound alarming.
Verify that the longitudinal and cross feeds work in both direction.
Buy it (yesterday).

Even if it needs some refurbishment/repair, you'll be working on a lathe that is worth owning and you'll be loath to ever sell it.

Although the milling attachment doesn't make it much of a milling machine, it will serve for LIGHT duty and one day will come in very handy (regardless of owning a more competent mill).

EDIT: I can't tell for sure but it may be sitting on the factory base, which has storage in the pedestals. Any accessories/tooling in there? Set the price before you look. The location is a mess so be sure to look around for components that may be is a box under (anything).
 
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mikey

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I can't tell for sure but it may be sitting on the factory base, which has storage in the pedestals. Any accessories/tooling in there? Set the price before you look. The location is a mess so be sure to look around for components that may be is a box under (anything).
Extropic, do you own a V10P? If so, that would be really helpful to Firewood.

Good thought about the possibility of stuff in the stand. I also just noticed that it has the Emco quick change tool post and a carriage stop on it. I cannot see if a thread dial indicator is there or not but it would be really nice if it was. Fingers crossed there is a full set of change gears sitting in a cardboard box in the stand; if you see it, find the little carrier stud and nut that goes with it.

Don't forget to find the lathe chuck key - they are well made.

The V10P has longitudinal and cross slide power feed, Firewood. It's that hex-shaped rod below the lead screw. Most 10" lathes today do not have a separate drive shaft for feeds - very nice.

Looks like the handle for the cross slide snapped off or came off. You'll have to find/make a replacement.
 

whitmore

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Bad news is the motor for the milling machine doesn't work. It hums but doesn't spin and a few cooling fins are snapped off.
That doesn't sound bad at all. Maybe just a run capacitor needs swapping (it's been years since I had a Maximat,
and the motor never gave me any trouble). It wouldn't hum if it had bad windings.
The 'milling machine' is a fairly nice drill press, but not as sturdy
as a real mill. Those lathes are near ideal for light work, you'll see.
 

eeler1

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What they all said. I had an Emco Super 11 for a while (paid $2500 US for it, lightly tooled and no milling attachment), and it was a pleasure to do work on. I believe the V10 was the predecessor of the Super 11, and is of similar quality and precision of the larger model. Original paint is a good sign, and the paint doesn't look like the machine was abused or even heavily used. Never liked the multi-machines, but you can sell off the milling attachment if you don't like it and get a dedicated mini-mill or mill-drill. Blue Ridge machinery used to carry an inventory of parts, don't know if they still do, or even if they are still in business. If you are looking for a quality machine for home shop use, this is a good candidate.
 

Firewood

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Thanks, everyone for the info! Especially Mike who has given me detailed information and guidance. I dug between the couch cushions and scraped up all the money I could find and pulled the trigger on buying it. I wasn't able to transport it home but I will be bringing it home in the near future and start cleaning and caring for it. I'm going to start reading and learning. I'll look into joining that yahoo group. I am very impressed with the attitudes of members on this forum. I have been on other forums and know how things can be frustrating, but it is refreshing to be on here with people that are very knowledgeable and helpful. I can't wait to get started and I'll be a regular on here!

Thanks again

I don't know what your plans are but if it was me, I would tear the bulk of the lathe down and clean/lube/repair it. You can leave the headstock alone but drain the oil and inspect everything carefully. I would take the saddle, cross slide and compound apart to clean and lube everything. While you're at all this, you can decide whether or not to repaint it or just put it back together and use it as is.
I definitely plan on tearing everything down and cleaning it. I'm pretty OCD about things being clean and tidy. I can't bear to see something fall into disrepair, I would sooner sell a tool to someone that will care for it properly if I don't have the time or will!

Oh, before I forget. The compound slides on an Emco lathe are very precise but the cross slide and longitudinal feeds are not as precise. In the future and if you keep this lathe, consider a DRO.
I will definitely look into this. More as an informative thing and something to consider down the road, but finances are limited and with baby #2 due in less than a month, it will be hard enough to break this to my wife (which I have yet to do)

I would rather own your used V10-P than most Asian lathes ... but then, I'm sort of biased!
I wholeheartedly agree. I am not fond of poorly made junk. I found out quickly that I can't afford to buy cheap tools because I end up getting frustrated with it (or it breaks) and I end up buying the good one after.

mikey has been taking great care of you.
Agreed!

Even if it needs some refurbishment/repair, you'll be working on a lathe that is worth owning and you'll be loath to ever sell it.

Although the milling attachment doesn't make it much of a milling machine, it will serve for LIGHT duty and one day will come in very handy (regardless of owning a more competent mill).
I fully agree. I hope it doesn't need much work, but It seems in mostly good condition. At least it was kept in a warm dry shop and not outside under a tarp!

EDIT: I can't tell for sure but it may be sitting on the factory base, which has storage in the pedestals. Any accessories/tooling in there? Set the price before you look. The location is a mess so be sure to look around for components that may be is a box under (anything).
Yes I believe it is the factory base. I assume there isn't anything in there, but it would certainly be a nice surprise if there was!

Don't forget to find the lathe chuck key - they are well made.
He told me that unfortunately the key has never been with it

Looks like the handle for the cross slide snapped off or came off. You'll have to find/make a replacement.
I noticed that and I can't remember if it snapped off or was removed, but I will definitely at the very least make something or get it made up, but I really like the idea of eventually getting all original parts if possible.

That doesn't sound bad at all. Maybe just a run capacitor needs swapping (it's been years since I had a Maximat,
and the motor never gave me any trouble). It wouldn't hum if it had bad windings.
The 'milling machine' is a fairly nice drill press, but not as sturdy
as a real mill. Those lathes are near ideal for light work, you'll see.
Thanks for the info, that's good to know. I am not educated on electronics but I'm trying to learn and it is nice to have a place to start troubleshooting!

What they all said. I had an Emco Super 11 for a while (paid $2500 US for it, lightly tooled and no milling attachment), and it was a pleasure to do work on. I believe the V10 was the predecessor of the Super 11, and is of similar quality and precision of the larger model. Original paint is a good sign, and the paint doesn't look like the machine was abused or even heavily used. Never liked the multi-machines, but you can sell off the milling attachment if you don't like it and get a dedicated mini-mill or mill-drill. Blue Ridge machinery used to carry an inventory of parts, don't know if they still do, or even if they are still in business. If you are looking for a quality machine for home shop use, this is a good candidate.
I would love to have a larger more rigid stand alone mill but I see that being in the distant future unfortunately! I have read that this definitely doesn't hold a candle to a dedicated mill but that it should be functional for me to learn on as long as I take light cuts.
 

mikey

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Congrats on your new lathe! You do know that pics are obligatory, right? You might consider starting a thread on your refurbishing adventures. Emco lathes are not common on this forum and it would be helpful to others to have a record of your efforts. No pressure, just suggesting.
 

mikey

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Forgot to mention that the cross slide handle is just a nice handle with rounded edges and a shoulder bolt that screws into the wheel. This is a simple fix so don't fret about it.
 

Firewood

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So I finally got it home and wrestled it into the basement. I am really excited but on closer inspection more things seem wrong with it than I originally noticed. The power feed handle is flaccid for a lack of better words. it sags down under its own weight starts to engage the cross feed power. There's also a few places where there was obviously an impact (the handle on top of the milling attachment is one). At any rate I'm going to start cleaning it up.

I'm not sure how far I should delve into this. I'm not going to be able to do a full restore right now (no painting etc.) but it would be nice to hear what I should do as a minimum. I just want it to be clean and functional and then one day down the road I'll do an in depth tear down. I have a baby due in two weeks (and a toddler right now) so spare time is few and far between, and comes at a premium. I am very excited for this and it will definitely be my pet project.

I forgot to mention that I'm not sure if this is an EMCO bench for it? Colour matches, but the layout is different from the ones I have seen pictured. Seems pretty sturdy though, and has the drip tray and all that fun stuff. Sadly, there weren't any hidden treasures to be found.
 

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extropic

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#22
Congratulations on your lathe purchase and, more importantly, the expected baby. Best wishes for both.

Most important recommendation: Pay unfailing attention to the family, et all. Nothing is more important.




When you get time for the lathe, wipe all the bare metal surfaces with solvent(s) to remove the unwanted.
Then apply a liberal oil film. I like LPS 2.

Next step is to get a copy of the owners/parts manual. Somebody will have one they will scan for you. Start a specific thread if necessary.

After you've read the manual, you'll want to collect the recommended lubricants and service all lube points and reservoirs.

Get the electrics figured out and connected.

Verify function of the controls and motors.

With your young family, that short list should take a month or two, at least. :grin:

Keep us posted about your progress, including pictures (the baby too). All the best.
 

markba633csi

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You won't regret buying it, one of the very best small lathes out there.
Try to spend a little time with the baby though (the human one) so your wife doesn't get mad:p
Mark S.
 

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Spend LOTS of time with the family.

That time is precious and fleeting.

The lathe has no emotions and will wait without adverse effects.
 

Firewood

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It's a girl! Now I have one of each.

A guy has some tooling he is selling for both lathes and milling machines. I'm going to measure the lathe bit when I get a chance to see what size it's set up for. I don't have any bits for the milling machine so what should I be looking for? What shank diameter etc? How about cutter head size?

Thanks in advance!
 

extropic

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Congratulations on the new girl. You know, we say if there are no pictures . . . it didn't happen. :D

For that mill I would be looking for cutter diameters no larger than 3/8" (maybe 1/4") because it's light duty and you're going to have to take light depth of cut (DOC) anyway.
As far as shank size goes, what collets came with milling head? I assume it uses collets, but I don't know for certain.

Did you get an Owners Manual / Parts List yet? That should show you what was intended and what was available.
 

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I believe it uses Morse taper #2, do a search if you need to buy them
Mark
 

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A spare part list and spare parts you can get here:

spare part list:
https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/image/data/pdfs/Maximat_V10P_spareparts.pdf

spare parts:
https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/spares/emco-maximat-v10p-spares

Niels from the Netherlands sells Emco spare parts, too, but his prices are horrible.

I usually look at:

https://www.ebay-kleinanzeigen.de/


I have a Maximat V10 without a mill. I got it from a teacher of the vocational college in Bochum/Germany. It was in best condition.
I mounted a multifix (is it the same word in English?) size AS from PeWeTools, that is a special one for lathes with a distance between centres of about 600mm.
Months later I replaced the top slide and now I use the top slide if a Emco Super 11 that is much more stable. Months later I replaced the top slide and now I use the top slide if a Emco Super 11 that is much more stable.
 

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Firewood

Swarf
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Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
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#29
Thank you for the reply and the information on parts. Coinci
A spare part list and spare parts you can get here:

spare part list:
https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/image/data/pdfs/Maximat_V10P_spareparts.pdf

spare parts:
https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/spares/emco-maximat-v10p-spares

Niels from the Netherlands sells Emco spare parts, too, but his prices are horrible.

I usually look at:

https://www.ebay-kleinanzeigen.de/


I have a Maximat V10 without a mill. I got it from a teacher of the vocational college in Bochum/Germany. It was in best condition.
I mounted a multifix (is it the same word in English?) size AS from PeWeTools, that is a special one for lathes with a distance between centres of about 600mm.
Months later I replaced the top slide and now I use the top slide if a Emco Super 11 that is much more stable. Months later I replaced the top slide and now I use the top slide if a Emco Super 11 that is much more stable.
Thank you for the information! Coincidentally I just started to do some tidying up of the lathe (two children take up more more time than one!) and I need to replace the drive belt and I ended up at the https://www.emcomachinetools.co.uk/ site. Good to have a positive review of it. I found Niel's prices a little steep. Should I order an extra (or two) drive belts? Do they fail often or rarely?
 

TeaBagofHorror

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
12
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4
#30
It is not nessecary to order extra belts. They live for many years and can be bought much cheaper than at www.emcomachinetools.co.uk everywhere on the internet.

For example (Germany) for my V10 (not -P)

http://www.keilriemenexpress.de 200 XL 075 €10,57
instrad of
http://www.nielsmachines.com/de/1072371/emco/ €35 (!!!!)

For a while the machines were sold with POM (delrin) gear wheels on the gear quadrant. When I bought my V10 one of them was broken. I replaced all of them using steel gears with fresh needle bearings and for the gear pair I took the bigger gear with hub on which I mounted the little gear. Into the hub I pressed a hardened bushing I got from the company I worked at. Runs very well but of course it makes a little noise compared to the delrin gears.
The whole machine I cleaned with oven cleaner spray. Worked fine.

Just ordered a Sino DRO. When mounted I´ll send pictures.

Hope my English ist understandable. I´m out of training.
 

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