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  • As some of you know, I have wanted to stop managing H-M for some time. It's a tremendous strain on my personal life. I want to set up my own shop. In September, September 15, to be exact, it will be 8 years that Hobby-Machinist has been in existence.

    I have been training VTCNC to run things here. Dabbler is going to learn too. I feel that they are ready to start taking over the operation. I will be here to help in case they need, but I don't think they will. Tony Wells is and will be here also to consult with. I will be doing backups, upgrades, and installing addons. Other than that, I will not be around. I am leaving this place in good operating condition, and financial condition.
    --Nelson
[4]

Another Tool & Cutter Grinder

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mark_f

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#1
I said a couple weeks ago I was going to start another tool and cutter grinder. Well , it is starting now. This was idea was started by myself and a friend of mine discussing tool sharpening. We came up with the idea to build a tool and cutter grinder that is much simpler to build than a Quorn or Bonnelle. I designed a base plan that is somewhat of a clone of a Cuttermaster. I am going to take features from the Cuttermaster and some from the Bonnelle and atemp to build a T&C grinder that is easier to build, easier to use, and still have all the needed versatility and high accuracy.
The idea centers around an X Y table , this one was made by Phase II. The table I was given is fairly new and tight but has laid around and got pretty rusty. I dismantled the table and have begun cleaning it up.
table1.jpg
The comlete table was as rusty as the T slots in this photo. I stoned the rust off the top and scraped the table surface to get a clean FLAT table top.
table2.jpg
The table top is finished and next will be to wire brush the slots clean and then clean up the rest of the parts and reassemble the table.
I am gathering materials to begin construction of the grinder. All the details are not ironed out yet. This build will most likely be a lot slower than the Bonnelle build was because my shop time is limited due to health. If all goes well, this grinder will be much easier to build, easier to operate, and maybe less expensive than a Bonnelle. The XY table will be the center piece of the grinder.
 

wrmiller

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#2
Ok, here we go. As I haven't yet started on my grinder, I will wait to see how this one comes out because I too have looked at the Cuttermaster and appreciate it's design/style. With all of these current projects going on, I have lots of things to follow and several bowls of popcorn going... :D
 

mark_f

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#3
Ok, here we go. As I haven't yet started on my grinder, I will wait to see how this one comes out because I too have looked at the Cuttermaster and appreciate it's design/style. With all of these current projects going on, I have lots of things to follow and several bowls of popcorn going... :D
I Think you will like this design better than the Bonnelle. The Bonelle is a work of art But way over engineered. It is a fine machine but very difficult compared to the Cuttermaster. I will be incorporating a few features into this design but keeping it as simple as possible. After studying the Cuttermaster, I find they have two designs. One has a column with the grind head able to go up and down. the other it only tilts. To make it go up and down is a lot more complex and really , I find it is not necessary for sharpening end mills, drills or lathe tools. However, it is necessary to be able to sharpen slitting saws and milling cutters that go on an arbor. For that reason, I am not decided on which to do here. I have considered just loosening the clamps on the Bonelle column and sliding the complete assembly up and off and sliding it on a new column on the new grinder. Doing this would make an awesome machine. If I do that, I then have a complete Bonnelle base that is wasted. I probably could sell it and recoup a few dollars. the other option is to build another complete grind head. These decisions are still up in the air. I do believe once this new grinder is finished , the Bonnelle will fall by the wayside and be un-needed. This new grinder will also make my precision drill sharpener obsolete as it will do the same job with a simple attachment that will mount on the table. So in short, I will be combining 3 machines into one, simplifying it and making it easier to set up and use. this sounds so perfect it frightens me :D, but we will see how it goes.
 

mark_f

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#4
table3.JPG
Finished scraping the table and cleaned the T slots. Next is to make new large dials and handles.
 

jeff_g1137

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#5
Hi
Sounds great to me, & good luck with your health, it gets harder as we get older. :eagerness:
 

mark_f

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#6
I got the table reconditioned and reassembled today.
table4.JPG
You know how I like my black wrinkle finish :D so I painted the table while it was apart. I reworked the lead screw assemblies To remove any backlash. I am making new dials. The original dials were about 1" in diameter.
table5 - Copy.JPG
Here you can see the new large dial backs. I have to start the numbered dials next. They are .100" per revolution. The new 2 3/4" dials will be easy to read with greater accuracy.
 

FOMOGO

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#7
Sounds like a plan. Will be following along with great interest. Hope your treating yourself well. Mike
 

Kennlindeman

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#8
Hi Mark Really enjoyed your last grinder project. Hope your health allows you the time in the workshop to complete this project. Thanks for the post you provide on your projects.
 

Navy Chief

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#9
Following along, sounds like an interesting plan.
 

mark_f

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#10
I got the dials for the table made. These are great. 2 3/4" in diameter. There is about .150" between marks and each mark is .001". You can easily see to adjust a quarter thousandth on these dials. There is a thumb screw lock so the dials can be zeroed at any position.
IMG_0356.JPG
IMG_0358.JPG
Next is to make the hand wheels.
 

mark_f

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#12
While I am waiting on some metal for the fingers on my bending brake, I thought I would get back to this project.

I spent a lot of time deciding what I wanted in this grinder and while the table provides the X and Y movement, it would be so easy to make a tilting head similar to the Cutter master machine and be able to grind end mills and drills, BUT, I wanted more capabilities without getting complicated. I love the Bonelle grinder I made but it is too complex and time consuming to set up every time you want to do something. I want it to be easier and simple. So......... I studied several brands and looked at the features and came up with a design that will fit all my parameters. I also want this machine to be very heavy and stable. I think I have it now. this machine will take two men to pick up and move. It will be heavy :grin:, which translates to sturdy. It will not be a whole lot bigger than the Bonelle, but will be higher and deeper. I spent a lot of hours designing the grinding head and column. I have it detailed enough to start construction.

This is the drawings for the grinding head. it is made from a 4" X 4" X 4 1/2" block of 6061 aluminum. I am using this because I happen to have it. Cast iron would be better, but......
Grinding Head (2).jpg
Grinding Head.jpg
Motor Mount and Swivel.jpg
The column will be 2" diameter cold roll bar. Again because I have it. I was thinking bigger but that would increase the head size also , so a compromise. There will be double split cotters to lock the swivel head in position. The motor will mount directly on the grinding head and the wheel will mount directly on the motor shaft. ( Now before a bunch of you flood me with the thought about vibration in the cutter wheel mounting it directly on the motor, I have researched this and even tested the idea. As long as you have good quality ball bearings in the motor, it is not a problem and the 60 cycle frequency has no effect that can be detected). The motor will swivel 360 degrees as will the column also, making any angular position possible with just two settings. The column and swivel head will be marked in 1 degree increments but with the spacing on the marks you should be able to set a 1/4 degree with great accuracy. The column will rise and lower just like I did it on the Bonelle. There will be a precision acme screw, 1/2"-10, giving .100" travel per turn and I have an anti back lash nut for the screw, eliminating any back lash in the assembly.

The degree markings for the motor swivel and the column swivel will be engraved on a 4" diameter wheel. this should make the one degree marks approximately .127" apart. That is why it will be easily set accurately.

There are three bolt clamps in the rear of the head to secure the head to the column. The top and bottom bolts will be lock bolts ( have a nylon insert in the threads to hold their setting). These will be set to put a light drag on the head sliding on the column. the center bolt will have a 1/4 turn locking handle to secure the grinding head at any setting vertically.
Facing the Grinding Head Block.JPG I put the aluminum block in my 4 jaw chuck to face the front. this will be the reference surface everything is measured from. All the machining for this view on the print will be completed before it is taken out of the chuck.

Grinding Head Block Faced.JPG The face is flat and smooth. Ready for finish machining. I will get more done this week end. Motor Mount and Swivel.jpg
 
Last edited:

mark_f

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#13
There is an error in the motor swivel plate. It will not be aluminum but instead made from cold finish steel. the reasons are I want dissimilar metals where the actual swivel is and the steel is heavier and sturdier.

I have been told I was a little nuts :rolleyes: for doing another grinder, but this one is soooooo much better, I just can't help myself.:grin:
 

Bill Gruby

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#14
One more time I will ask you new people to pay close attention to Marks' machinery. That lathe is not a big 12 inch beast. Mark is highly skilled at coaxing the max from his equipment. He also does not ask them to do something they are not capable of doing. Mark is the Master of his shop, not the machines. Keep up the great work Mark, you are amazing.

"Billy G"
 

mark_f

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#15
Thank you, Bill. i hope someone learns some things from my escapades, as that is my goal. To show the hobbyist what is possible and how to make what you need instead of buying it,( which also saves money)(
 

Ulma Doctor

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#16
i like your thinking and your beautiful work, Mark :grin:
 

MikeWi

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#17
Man o man! I love watching your builds. I'm getting out the popcorn now.
 

mark_f

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#18
The hand wheels for the table on this grinder came today. They are 4 inches in diameter.
table hand wheels 1.jpg I got these off eBay at a good price. I will drill and tap a hole for the spinner handles ( I will make) and ream the center hole for the table shafts. They are nice cast iron chrome plated wheels. I think I should get a couple more of these.
 

chips&more

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#19
The hand wheels for the table on this grinder came today. They are 4 inches in diameter.
View attachment 123841 I got these off eBay at a good price. I will drill and tap a hole for the spinner handles ( I will make) and ream the center hole for the table shafts. They are nice cast iron chrome plated wheels. I think I should get a couple more of these.
Might want to check out the handwheels at Enco. Especially when they have their discount and free shipping. Like, right now! I have gotten some of there in the ruff cast iron handwheels. They machined beautifully, no complaints.
 

roadie33

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#20
The hand wheels for the table on this grinder came today. They are 4 inches in diameter.
View attachment 123841 I got these off eBay at a good price. I will drill and tap a hole for the spinner handles ( I will make) and ream the center hole for the table shafts. They are nice cast iron chrome plated wheels. I think I should get a couple more of these.
Where did you find them Mark?
Those look really nice. Are they good and solid?
I need to get a couple of them for another project also.
 

mark_f

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#21
Where did you find them Mark?
Those look really nice. Are they good and solid?
I need to get a couple of them for another project also.
I got the two on eBay for $20 and they are finished beautifully. They are Chrome plated, the rim is machined smooth, and there is a spot to drill for a spinner handle. I am really impressed with them and one reason is they have about a 1/4" hole so they are open for any finish bore size. I happen to need about .375" give or take a few thou. The bad thing is , I went back to get two more and they are all gone. Another seller has them for $15 each , so I ordered another because I need three total. I went to Enco as suggested in an above post, but the smallest bore is 3/8" and I'm not sure how accurate it is. I need a good fit on my shafts so I'm going with the $15 one. (I should have ordered the doubles when I could).
 

wrmiller

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#22
I bought some 4 or 5" chromed CI handwheels from Griz for not much money ($6 bucks?). The holes for the spinners were already drilled and tapped, but I had to drill and bore the center holes. Used these on my 12z with great success.
 

mark_f

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#23
I bought some 4 or 5" chromed CI handwheels from Griz for not much money ($6 bucks?). The holes for the spinners were already drilled and tapped, but I had to drill and bore the center holes. Used these on my 12z with great success.
I went and looked there but could not find any hand wheels.:frown:
 

mark_f

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#24
I bored the motor swivel socket in the grinding head.
Tuning the swivel socket.JPG Turning the motor swivel socket. this must be done now so it is concentric and square with the face.

Swivel socket finished.JPG The swivel socket is finished. The smaller hole will be tapped for a 1/2" shoulder bolt that will hold the motor plate on the head.

Next the head is turned 90 degrees in the chuck and the hole for the column will be bored.
Boring head for the column.JPG
 

roadie33

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#27
Just what I was looking for also. I never thought to check Grizzly out.
Thanks.
 

mark_f

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#28
I finished boring the head for the column to fit today.
IMG_0646.JPG There is a 2" hole all the way thru and the socket for the motor swivel is done also. I tapped the 1/2"-13 hole in the socket hed for the shoulder bolt that will keep it in place.
IMG_0645.JPG
Next is drill holes for the split cotters and the clearance hole for the elevation screw, and then to start milling all the excess material off to get the final shape. I was going to bore these holes but instead will drill and ream them on the drill press as I don't have the capabilities to set this large block up on my lathe or mill to get at the locations of these holes. Their position accuracy is not that great so I can get them well within tolerance drilling and reaming them and reaming will give excellent size and finish.

Boring head for the column.JPG
 

mark_f

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#29
After drilling the hole for the lead screw to pass thru, I decided a better way to bore the split cotter holes.
image.jpeg
With the mill table on my lathe.
 

FOMOGO

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#30
Coming along nicely. I like the lathe setup. Mike
 
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