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mark_f

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#31
The mill table on my lathe worked great. I got straight holes with a good slip fit on the brass rod for the split cotters.
IMG_0653.JPG
IMG_0652.JPG
 

mark_f

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#32
After a couple hours on my mill, the aluminum block for the grinding head is all cut to shape.
milled grinding head 2.JPG
milled grinding head.JPG I have to drill some bolt holes in it yet.

The steel came for the motor mount so I began turning the swivel mount.
machining motor swivel mount.JPG It is finished to size. I need to drill and ream a .625" hole in the center and engrave the 360 degree markings on the 4" section. This must all be done before it is removed from the chuck to insure everything is concentric. This is very important as the holes and the stub have to be concentric to align perfectly when assembled to the grinding head. Any out of alignment and the mount will not swivel easily or may bind.

I have the brass split cotters almost finished.
brass split cotters.JPG Just have to cut in half and bevel the ends.
 

34_40

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#33
Got here a bit late.. but I made it!
I'm fascinated by this topic as I have many end mills and cutters for the horizontal mill that might benefit from such a tool.
I watched Bill G. do one and have been intrigued since! Can't wait for the next installment!
 
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mark_f

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#34
Got here a bit late.. but I made it!
I'm fascinated but this topic as I have many end mills and cutters for the horizontal mill that might benefit from such a tool.
I watched Bill G. do one and have been intrigued since! Can't wait for the next installment!
At the first of the year, I built a Bonelle tool and cutter grinder (which is way over engineered). This grinder is much simpler to build and will be much easier to operate.
 

mark_f

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#35
While the motor mount was in the lathe, I turned all the diameters, drilled and reamed a .625 hole in the center and engraved the 360 degree markings so everything is concentric. this is very important for fit and function.Any misalignment will cause the motor mount to bind when rotated.
IMG_0660.JPG It fits in the socket perfectly. I engraved the lines and stamped the numbers. I didn't bother taking photos or explaining this as It has been covered in several of my other projects.
IMG_0659.JPG Although the markings are all the way around the piece, 360 degrees in 1 degree increments, there are only numbers from zero to 90 degrees on either side of zero. This is because the head will usually be positioned plus or minus a few degrees from zero to grind most all tools. How ever, I put the marks all the way around in case they are ever needed.
 

FOMOGO

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#36
Very nice, as always. Looking forward to seeing it in action. Mike
 

rhynardt

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#37
Hi Mark
Any chance of the drawings being made available? My little homeshop definitely needs a cuttergrinder!
 

mark_f

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#38
Hi Mark
Any chance of the drawings being made available? My little homeshop definitely needs a cuttergrinder!
Yes, all drawings and a detailed build article will be available to anyone who wants it when completed. I am making and changing the drawings as I build since this was deigned by myself, borrowing features from several machines to make an easy to use tool and cutter grinder that is also easy to build. I posted a grinding head drawing here but things are changing constantly during the build.
 

rhynardt

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#39
Thanks Mark. Really appreciate your generosity. I'm eagerly anticipating this one!!
 

mark_f

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#40
I decided to make my own shoulder bolt today , but then abandoned that idea for a better one, but I want to point out something particularly to newbies at machining. Many people don' have a 4 jaw chuck and ALL 3 jaw chucks have some run out that varies with the clamping diameter. This is caused by inaccuracies in the scroll and the teeth on the jaws. NO ONE can or makes a scroll chuck accurate at all diameters. That being said ( and it is true), I found a way to make my three jaw chuck accurate ( I had to before I got a 4 jaw). Look closely at this photo. I wanted to turn a precision shoulder bolt using a standard bolt.
IMG_0662.JPG The shank of the bolt was very round and true, so I chucked the bolt on the shank in front of the head and center drilled the end. Now I have the end with a true reference point. Now, we all know that the heads of bolts are forged and can be way off center with regards to the shank. I cut a bunch of small pieces of copy paper to put under the offending jaws. there are 10 layers under one jaw and two layers under the other. this makes the shank run true within .001". now I can machine it. I have done this with round stock to make it run true in my three jaw chuck. I have also use this principle to make offsets. I needed a shaft with a section offset .375". I put a small scrap of 3/8" thick aluminum or steel in one jaw between the jaw and the piece. This gave me my .375" offset when machined this way. Now that the backyard machinist lesson is over we will get back to the tool and cutter grinder.
 
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mark_f

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#41
With the grinding head mostly machined, I now need to fasten the motor mount to the head. I was going to use a shoulder bolt but opted for a brass bushing.
IMG_0663.JPG Here you can see a 1/2" bolt which is a good slip fit into the bushing I made. The bushing is a couple thousandths longer than the distance of the motor swivel and the recess in the grinding head. when assembled and tightened, the bushing is captured by the bolt and the swivel rotates on the brass bushing easily but with no detectable end play. The swivel only has .001" clearance all the way around its circumference. this assembly is very precision and has no play anywhere. This is why it was important to be precise on sizes and everything had to be very concentric to have no binding. The assembly works great.
IMG_0664.JPG The swivel is mounted in this photo and works extremely well.
IMG_0665.JPG The motor plat mounts and covers the bolt. There will be 4 holes in this plate for the motor to bolt to. Next is the split cotters to lock the motor in position.
Split Cotter.jpg
This is the print for the brass split cotters. I chose to use two for security although one probably would do the job.

IMG_0667.JPG The split cotters are in place and work perfectly. If you look at t he print there is a spring pocket in one half of the cotter. I put a spring in between the two halves so when loosened they separate and release the motor swivel.

IMG_0666.JPG I tapped the one side of the head and the other side is clearanced for a 5/16" bolt. The top and bottom bolts are tightened just enough to give a nice sliding head with no slop. the center bolt will be tightened to lock the head in place. this takes a maximum of a quarter turn because the other two hold it so close. I will make a special bolt with a handle for the center bolt later on. The heavy steel washer are close fit and prevent the bolt from digging into the aluminum.
IMG_0669.JPG The grinding head is mounted to the 2" column. Everything came out perfect so far.

IMG_0674.JPG I made a brass pointer that will be somewhat adjustable for indicating the position of the motor tilt. I will not fasten this until the complete grinder is assembled so it will read zero with the motor and grinding wheel mounted. ( It will also get polished to a nice shine.

IMG_0673.JPG The anti back lash lead screw nut is mounted on the head. It is as close as possible to the column to make the elevating easier. ( it has to work harder the farther out it is.)
The next step here will be to make the upper and lower lead screw brackets. One at the top of the column and one at the lowest travel point on the column. Once they are mounted the head will not be able to rotate . The whole column assembly will rotate to change the angle. The head will retain its position because the acme lead screw will prevent it from rotating. I found this worked very well when I built the Bonelle grinder. The precision nut keeps the head from having any play in the rotational axis.
The reason for the massive size of the head is because the 48 frame motor weighs 13 pounds and I wanted a lot of rigidity in this machine.

I was thinking of painting the head with black wrinkle finish, but first I am going to polish the aluminum to a mirror finish and see if I like that better. The head is complete to where it is time to polish it
 
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mark_f

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#42
I mocked up the motor assembly today and tested it. This is the 1/2 HP split phase motor I got from the Chinese water pump. Originally it was for the Bonelle grinder but didn't have enough starting torque, so I got a bigger motor for it. This motor has plenty of power once it is up to speed so will be ideal for this setup because it is small and light. It will be good for this direct drive setup. I also mounted the pointer for the degree markings.
IMG_0680.JPG

IMG_0678.JPG The motor is mounted on the head. Everything is working out quite well. That switch box will be removed from the motor and mounted remotely. I painted the head black wrinkle finish but polished the top , bottom, and front. It looks nice. Once the grinder is built, the motor will be aligned so the wheel will be level and square with the table when all dials are at zero, then the motor will be pinned in this location so it cannot move out of alignment.
I also got the hand wheels mounted on the table. They are great. I will make the spinner handles to go on the hand wheels.
IMG_0675.JPG Y axis hand wheel.
IMG_0676.JPG X axis hand wheel.
IMG_0682.JPG I am using a 3/4" thick aluminum plate for the base for this grinder. I have the parts setting in place to see how they will fit. I still have to make the swivel base for the column.
I have made an arbor for the motor shaft to adapt different grinding wheels. I will be posting these details soon.
 

mark_f

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#43
I made the motor arbor. This is the print for it.
Motor Arbor.jpg
 

FOMOGO

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#44
Your really moving along. Looks great. Mike
 

pebbleworm

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#45
An excellent write up and a good design! I can see the Quorn ancestry every once in a while and this looks a lot less fidgety.
 

mark_f

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#46
An excellent write up and a good design! I can see the Quorn ancestry every once in a while and this looks a lot less fidgety.
The first of last year , I built a Bonelle grinder which is basically an over engineered Quorn. It is a great grinder but requires a lot of setup. This grinder is more like a Cutter Master and will be much simpler and easier to setup and operate. It will also do everything the Bonelle and Quorn will do but easier.
 

rhynardt

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#47
Hi Mark.
Your work is first class! Thank you for sharing. Could you please supply me with the dimensions of the x-y table with movement range figures aswell. I want to start getting materials together for that and to start making something similar. Thanks in advance
 

mark_f

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#48
Hi Mark.
Your work is first class! Thank you for sharing. Could you please supply me with the dimensions of the x-y table with movement range figures aswell. I want to start getting materials together for that and to start making something similar. Thanks in advance
The table I am using is a Phase II , X Y table. there are several brands less expensive. ( I happen to get this one given to me by a friend :grin: ). Enco has one and there are a couple on eBay. The table is about 5 1/2" wide and around 12 inches long. There is 4" of X movement and 6 1/2" of Y movement. I just looked it up and it is on eBay for $150 new. The table and the motor are the most expensive parts. you need a small motor at least 1/3 hp or more with a 42 or 48 frame mounting, 3450 rpm and it needs to have ball bearings. I got the lead screw and anti back lash nut on eBay. the screw was around $12 and the nut was about $17. Pretty much everything else is made from aluminum and steel. My prints will specify. If you want, I can send you the prints for everything I have done so far.

A NOTE: I disassembled the table, cleaned everything up, made new large dials and hanged the cranks to 4" diameter hand wheels ( got the hand wheels off eBay. They are about $15 each now but really nice ones). I tried to eliminate as much backlash as possible in the table and installed a lock handle in place of one of the gib set screws on each axis. I make most everything I need. It is important to have the best quality table you can find even if it costs a little more because the accuracy is important.
 
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rhynardt

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#49
Thanks for the info Mark. Ebay is somewhat of a myth in my part of the world. I will have to make a table from scratch if i cannot find one somewhere. I have someone who has promised me a 200mm long set of linear ball bearings , which i have planned to use as the y-axis. For the x-axis i plan to make a wide dovetail setup with the leftover cast iron tractor weights from my Tom Senior/Maho vertical mill head conversion.
Would you mind sending me the prints please.
Thank you once a again for sharing
 

mark_f

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#50
Thanks for the info Mark. Ebay is somewhat of a myth in my part of the world. I will have to make a table from scratch if i cannot find one somewhere. I have someone who has promised me a 200mm long set of linear ball bearings , which i have planned to use as the y-axis. For the x-axis i plan to make a wide dovetail setup with the leftover cast iron tractor weights from my Tom Senior/Maho vertical mill head conversion.
Would you mind sending me the prints please.
Thank you once a again for sharing
I couldn't figure out how to send the prints to you directly so I will put them here. you can save them. It is possible I make a few errors so watch them closely and ask if something doesn't look right. These are what I have done so far. There will be more to follow.
Elevation Screw Bracket.jpg Grinding Head (2).jpg Grinding Head.jpg Motor Arbor.jpg Motor Mount and Swivel.jpg Split Cotter.jpg
 

rhynardt

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#51
Thanks Mark, much appreciated.do you reckon the linear bearings will be sufficient for the y axis?
 

mark_f

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#52
Thanks Mark, much appreciated.do you reckon the linear bearings will be sufficient for the y axis?
Oh yes. In fact that was what I was going to use until I got this table.
 

34_40

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#54
Trying to keep up here!
Can't wait for the next installment,, (cause I'm so "lost"!) LOL...
 

mark_f

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#55
I got part of the head elevation system made. I turned the ends of the lead screw to .375" to fit the bushings in the supports. I then made the supports from 1" thick Aluminum bar stock, 3 inches wide and 4 inches long.
IMG_0685.JPG I bored the 2 inch hole in each piece. then turned a light press fit plug to keep the two pieces aligned. The bearing hole for the lead screw is located 1.500" from the center of the 2 inch hole. The part was clamped to the drill press table and the hole drilled and reamed.
IMG_0686.JPG
IMG_0687.JPG I put t he reamer in the hole to keep the pieces aligned and cut the final shape in the band saw.
IMG_0688.JPG
IMG_0690.JPG This is the lead screw supports after cutting. all that is left is to drill for a set screw and polish. It was important to take care that these two parts are exactly alike so the lead screw will function with no binding over the complete travel range. Thr reason for the suports bieng 1" thick is to make sure they are thick enough to sit and hold perfectly perpendicular to the column. this requires the 2" hole to be a light press to a slip fit on the column. Next is to make the brass bushings
 
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NEL957

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#56
Mark
Just got up to date and what a build. Love it and I hate to say it but maybe the Quorn is going into a box and look a little bit closer at building something like this.
Thank you for all you do.
Nelson
 

mark_f

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#57
Mark
Just got up to date and what a build. Love it and I hate to say it but maybe the Quorn is going into a box and look a little bit closer at building something like this.
Thank you for all you do.
Nelson
Yea Nelson, ......... I wish I had thought of this design before I built the Bonelle. I would have built this instead. It is easier to build and will be simpler to set up and use. I am using the Chinese water pump motor for the grinding head. it is perfect for it. Light weight, lots of power , and I don't have to worry about not having enough starting torque to overcome the belts , spindle, and pulleys.....cause there aren't any! This is much heavier than the Quorn or Bonelle. sturdier too. It will do everything the same with less setting up. I think the cost is actually going to be less too. Definitely will be for me , but if you bought everything new , it certainly would not cost more. I am really excited with this build and can't wait to finish it and see how it works.
I found a new source for metal also. this guy was one of the founders of one of the major online suppliers. he retired and started another online metal supply company. I been buying from him and he is competitive in price and ships the cheapest way possible. and only charges actual shipping costs. I call him or email him and get a quote quickly. Remind me to tell you about it next time we talk.
 

mark_f

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#58
I forgot to post the photos of the grinding wheel arbor for the motor. It is held on the motor shaft with two setscrews 90 degrees apart. I made this yesterday.

IMG_0683.JPG The arbor is .750" diameter. The nut and arbor is threaded .750-28 threads. I made these as close to a class 3 fit as possible. The arbor runs well with no vibration. This holds wheels with a 3/4" hole. There is a washer set I made which allows me to install wheels with a 1 1/4" bore on this arbor. I test run the arbor with all parts without a wheel to be sure it runs smooth with no vibration.
IMG_0684.JPG I am also making a set of washers to adapt some metric wheels I have. The wheel guard is designed ( before someone asks :grin: ). It will bolt directly to the front of the motor housing and cover the shaft , arbor, and wheel. There will be three interchangeable guards to work with most wheel diameters. I want them to be easy to change out. A friend is going to roll the metal for the guards.
 

mark_f

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#59
I got the elevation screw and brackets installed on the column. It seems to work smoothly but just a little stiff. That is better than sloppy though. I think it is a little stiff because everything was held to a thousandth or two in making all these parts. It is impossible to work that close on old machines in my tiny shop and everything line up perfectly, but I put it together and it works smoothly, just a tiny bit stiffer than I prefer, but I am going to leave it as is. It's not like I'll be cranking it up and down very much or very far.
IMG_0691.JPG Once I get the hand wheel on it, it should turn much easier. I was turning the screw with my fingers ( that may be why I think it is so stiff). Also it is dry....no lube yet.
I ordered $160 worth of metal today for this machine. I need a bigger base plate, so I ordered a 16" X 18" X 3/4 aluminum plate ( that was $100). I also ordered metal for the column base and a couple other parts I need. As soon as it gets here I can get moving again. I figure this grinder is going to cost me about $350 to build. If I had bout everything new...... I think it would hit about $650 maybe. but that is a lot better than $7000.

More to come later.......
 

wrmiller

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#60
No lube or handwheel?!? I think you're being a bit too hard on yourself Mark.

Given what I've seen of your previous work, I suspect it will work just fine once you have it all completed. :)
 
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