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Any Idea What This Is

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ddickey

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#1
I have feeling it has something to do with watches. That's why I placed it here.
1520609925835.png
 

4ssss

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#2
You're right. I believe it's used for pressing gears and pins.
 

ddickey

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#3
I wonder it's worth.
 

chips&more

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#4
It's called a "staking set". Fleabay would be a good price guide.
 

ddickey

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#5
Looks like ~ $100-$200
 
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#6
More for clock making I think. Staking, peening, crimping holes smaller, pressing gears onto shafts, etc. I paid CA$35 at a local auction for mine.

E.g. the rounded ones on far right are great for pinching a hole smaller to make a pin tighter fit.
 

chips&more

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#7
Used primarily for the Watchmaker. The size of the stakes and dies are too small for most clock making/clock repairing…but not all. The tooling is a VERY hard steel. Use caution or you can easily fracture the business ends. They can break like glass. Don’t ask me how I know this! Anybody doing serious watch repair would definitely need one of these. In my parts they do not command a lot of money. It’s a shame, they are made of extreme quality. And if a watchmaker they are like of your hands. I kinda fancy the Levin made...Dave
 
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David S

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#8
Yes this is a staking set. And it is more frequently used by watch repairers, but certainly can be used for clock repair as well if the wheels with arbours can fit within the Z axis clearance. All of the parts in the front are called stumps and are used to support various watch parts.

There are a few for sale here: http://www.execulink.com/~lfoord/tools.html#staking

David
 

ddickey

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#9
This one may be a Kendrick & Davis
 

Dave Smith

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#10
how did you end up with it?---every shop should have one--I think I have two in my shop--Dave
 

NEL957

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#11
Stacking tool is a must if you are going to do clock and watch repair. Replacing pivots is impossible with a tool to drive dead straight, it must go on straight to get it as tight as possible. I would call that pictured as one of the better and quite complete, just what one needs. And a little bit better than $200.00
Nelson
 

Manderioli

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#12
Learned something new today. Literally this week I was curious how Duncan pressed gears onto shafts for the 1950s parking meters. Now I have a new addition to my tool list.
 
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