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ARC-170's Craftsman 101.07403 lathe restoration thread

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westsailpat

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1-5 i'm not really sure , yes some of the bolts look un stock . 6 u know 7 is the oil cup , but it is missing the oil quill . The oil is put on the dead center . 8 You are missing some parts , but that is the saddle lock . 9 those screws you un screw and oil . The one closest to the cross feed handle for sure , the other one I think . My lathe only has the one . 10 yes those are not stock and they should have nuts . Whew ...
 

ARC-170

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I forgot to point out that #7 has no hole for oil to exit; this is just a hole in the tailstock.
 

guckrob

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Here is a manual with an exploded view and part numbers for everything. you should be able to google different versions of this if this doesn't match your exact model, but this really helped me get the missing pieces for my craftsman 12". Note that in the cases where the part is a screw, etc there will be an asterisk next to it and the manifest lists the size of the screw so you can easily track down the hardware store parts.

Good luck and I'm sure people here can help you find what you need.
 

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guckrob

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note that the small set screws on the cross slide do unscrew and are for oil.
 

wa5cab

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Some of these questions have been answered but I'll include them here just to have everything in one place.

The Craftsman 12" manual attached above is for the 101.28900 and 28910, not for the 101.07403. There are enough differences that it may in some cases be more confusing than helpful. You will need to first make a donation but then you can download the parts manual on the 101.07403 (after reading the Downloads instructions up in the Sticky area). The 28900/28910 replaced the 07403, 27430 and 27440 in mid 1957. Some of the parts remained the same but many changed. Atlas (unlike GM and thousands of other companys) never changed an existing part number unless there was a significant change to the part. In most cases, if revisions were made to a part and the changed part was backwards compatible either directly or if some other parts were also changed, the revised part kept the original base part number but got a suffix letter beginning with A, then B, and so forth. When the 10, 10D and then 10F lathes came out, in most cases the base part number was retained but the prefix was changed to 10, 10D or 10F if the new part served the same function but wasn't interchangeable. Atlas bought Clausing in 1949/50. But by 1957, the Clausing people had or had begun to have the upper hand and the only part of those rules that the followed was that if the parts usage changed but the part hadn't changed, it kept its original part number. But if the part was changed it got a new Clausing part number, which I have never been able to determine the logic to.

Anyway, if the part in the 28900/28910 has an Atlas style part number, it is the same as on the 07403. If it has a Clausing part number, it is different. And one improvement that did appear with the Clausing parts lists is that commercial parts like nuts, bolts, keys, etc. were included and sufficiently described.

1. If this is a socket head screw as it appears to be, it isn't original as the original was a Fillister head Phillips screw. But in any case, it plus the other two plus three square nuts retain the 10F-11 Gear Case on the back side of the apron. These parts aren't shown on the apron parts drawing for the 101.07403 but are for the 101.28900/28910.

2. The missing 10F-84 Knob is retained by a 3/32" x 1/2" Groove Pin,

3. Again, may not be original, but it retains the 10F-81 Bearing, part of the power cross feed.

4. Retains the 10F-17 Stud, also part of power cross feed.

5. On the back side of the apron, for one of the two alignment groove pins for the half nut guide. The only reason that I can think of for it to be drilled through from the front is that it was located off of the hole for the half nut actuator (scroll) shaft (which has to be drilled from the front), and then the other hole was located on the back side off of the first two. It's the same way on all of the 12" and 10"aprons or carriages.

6. Yes, a 1/4"-20 square head bolt which should be down in the hole and a threaded lock lever 9-42A.

7. That hole is for storing the 10D-260 oil or white lead dropper for when you are using a dead center in the tailstock ram.

8. for the square head bolt for the carriage lock.

9. Their purpose is to keep swarf (chips, shavings and dust) from getting into the cross feed screw bearing or onto the power cross feed gears. They are removed for oiling the bearing and gears, then put back in the holes and turned down flush with the top of the dovetail.

10. Yes, the screws are all wrong and yes, they should all have lock nuts.
 

Superburban

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I thin k oil Dauber is the right name. I also think it was one of Mr Petes videos, where he makes one for one of his lathes.

Here is a pic I saved from somewhere, and a drawing, of course the dimensions will need be changed to fit your needs. I will be the first project for my southbend when I get it back together.

dauber photo.JPGarealproject.JPG
 

wa5cab

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The original Atlas 10 had a somewhat lighter tailstock without the protrusion and hole for the oil dropper. The 10D-260 Oil Dropper first appeared with the 10D lathe (as indicated by its part number), which was circa 1936. The earliest 10" lathe parts list that we currently have is of the 10E, which is the so-called "Unit Plan" version of the 10D (no change gears or back gears). It lists the 10D-260. Several pretty good photos from catalogs or brochures show that the 10D-260 probably looked like the one in Post #7 rather than the one in #8. I would guess that #8 came from either Clausing, Logan or South Bend. The last dated parts list that we have that shows 10D-260 is Lathe Bulletin 10L-6 dated June, 1966. So neither the part number nor the name changed over 30+ years. The re-designed 12" introduced in late 1957 and sold by both Atlas and Sears does not have an oil dropper.
 

ARC-170

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Thanks to all for your input! Much appreciated. I should have mentioned that I have the parts list for my particular lathe model. It's just not very clear in some respects. There are no lines showing where parts go, just the parts shown in approximate relative relation. It's hard to tell what goes where without the center lines that are usually used to show the alignment of parts.

Robert, thanks, as always, for your help.

1. I think this was fixed at some point. I found a broken miter gear that appears to be part of the carriage (there are two listed on my parts diagram). I can't see behind, but I think I might be missing something or the lathe had something repaired. I won't know until I clean the lathe, lube it and then try all the features.

2. Could I just make one of these knobs and buy a roll pin? I need a photo of the knob, though. I could find one on Ebay, but similar ones are really pricey.

3-5. Noted, thanks!

6. This appears to be a simple mechanism. I could make one of these. I have one piece; I could turn the other one and mill the chamfer. Could I make this out of aluminum or would steel be better? I could find one on Ebay, but similar ones are really pricey.

7. I see that now that I know what to look for, thanks! The part is listed in the exploded parts view as "10D-260 oil dropper". Thanks to Superburban and westsailpat!

8. I figured this out after I posted. I plan to buy a bolt and washer and make a square clamp (part#9-14 clamp). I think steel would be best.

9. Noted, thanks!

10. I found the nuts, bolts and washers at Fastenal, which just happens to have a branch near me.

Looks like I need to get the lathe working so I can make a few parts for it!
 

wa5cab

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2. Yes, you can make the knob (out of steel). The same knob is used on the 28900 & 28910. The drawing there may be better. Or you might be able to buy a similar knob from some place like Ace Hardware and drill out the threads and cross-drill it. Just be sure that the substitute is smooth, not fluted, as the knob will be spinning when you need to pull it out or push it back in. No but you can buy the taper pin, probably again from Ace.

6. You can make it out of aluminum but the threads won't last very long. Use steel. I think that you can still buy the cast handle from Clausing. To get the parts out of the hole, first run the tailstock ram all of the way out and then pull it out of the tailstock. Then slide the tailstock off of the ways and invert it and see if the bolt won't fall through far enough to grab the threads.

9. There should be a drawing of the 9-14 clamp plate in Downloads. Use steel.
 

ARC-170

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11. (could be #9 continued, but let's go with 11): I've started looking for parts that I need and took a closer look at the change gears on the side. Here is a picture of what came with the machine. It appears to be set up for 0.005" feed (see chart) instead of the "standard" that is shown in the parts manual (see below for specifics). Am I correct?
lathe gears with letters.jpg
lathe gear chart.jpg
A: spindle-fixed, isn't changed for threading, feed rate, etc, correct?
B: 24 tooth gear
C: 20 tooth gear
D/E: 32/16 tooth compound gear, isn't changed for threading, feed rate, etc, correct?
B, C, D, and E are part of the reverse/forward mechanism, and are not changed for threading, feed rate, etc, correct?
F/G: 48/20
H/I: 52/20
J: 54 connects to lead screw, correct?

The parts manual calls for F/G to be 56/20 and H/I to be 64/20 and J to be 64.

So it would appear I need the following change gears:
24, 32 (2), 36, 40, 44, 46, 54, 56, 64 (2), and 50 and 60 for metric threads.

For reference the set called for in the parts manual is: 24, 32 (2), 36, 40, 44, 46,48, 52, 54. I think I have 48 and 52 (F, H).

It also appears I need the 9-70A bushings that go in the gears. Correct? None of the change gear sets come with them.

Can someone confirm/correct this so I can start looking for a set and/or individual change gears? Thanks!
 
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mickri

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Are you sure that gear J is a 54? It looks too big to be a 54 when compared to your 52 H gear. It might be a 64. Other than that it looks like you have identified the change gears you need. You already have the 9-70A bushings. There will be a 9-70A bushing on your F/G, H/I and J gears. These bushings are sometimes stuck in the gears. At least they were on my lathe. I had to soak my gears in solvent to free up the bushings.
 

ARC-170

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Are you sure that gear J is a 54? It looks too big to be a 54 when compared to your 52 H gear. It might be a 64. Other than that it looks like you have identified the change gears you need. You already have the 9-70A bushings. There will be a 9-70A bushing on your F/G, H/I and J gears. These bushings are sometimes stuck in the gears. At least they were on my lathe. I had to soak my gears in solvent to free up the bushings.
Yes. it has a "54" on it and I just counted them to be sure. The other one has a "52" on it.

I had a feeling the bushings were removable! It occurred to me after I posted and looked again at the parts diagram and didn't see them listed anywhere else. Thanks for confirming.
 

wa5cab

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First some comments.
I assume that you moved F/G and H/I out of mesh to improve visibility.

There are two gear positions for each position on the Change Gear Bracket (AKA Banjo), Front and Back, or Front and Rear, or Near and Far. Your threading chart should use Front and Rear. This includes the Screw Gear, although there should never be but one actual gear in the Screw position. The other position is occupied by a smooth spacer.

A gear in the Rear position can only mesh with another gear in the rear position. A gear in the Front position can only mesh with another gear in the Front position.

Any gear that is both driven and driving is an Idler. It can be replaced with anything else that will fit without changing the speed of the lead screw

The only gears that can effect the speed of the lead screw relative to the spindle are compound gears and the screw gear

A is the spindle gear. It never changes.

B & C are the tumbler gears. They never change. Which one is FWD and which is REV depends upon whether there are an even number or an odd number of gears in the rest of the gear train. And for that matter on how you want to define FWD and REV,

D & E never change, but if you look at the threading chart, you will see that sometimes C is driving the next gear in the train and sometimes D is. If C is used, the lead screw will turn half as fast as it will if D is used. In other words, using C gives you a 2:1 reduction.

F and G are not a compound gear because G cannot mesh with anything. Therefore, F is an Idler and G is a Spacer.

H and I are a Compound Gear. H is driven by F and I drives J, the Screw Gear on your threading chart.

J is the Screw Gear. It is currently in the Front position and in the Rear position is a spacer. So yes, J connects to the screw.

There should already be two 9-70A keyed bushings on the Banjo, one in F & G and one in H & I. After dinner, I'll confirm your Needed list. But it's probably right, except for the two 9-70A's.
 
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ARC-170

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12. How much does this lathe weigh? Just the lathe, not the stand. I thought of getting a crane scale to use with my engine hoist but that seems a waste for just one use. Can these be rented? I thought of getting a used one on CL, but I'm afraid it might not be accurate. I don't need the weight to the nearest ounce; the nearest pound will be fine.
13. I bought another lathe to use for parts: the belt guards and some other pieces mine is missing. It is a different color, though. I'd like to paint the machine. Does anyone know the actual color names or should I just get close? Does it really matter, anyway? Mine is an aqua green. I like it, but I haven't seen a rattle can color that matches. I could get it matched at an auto paint shop but that might be expensive, especially since I don't think I need auto paint for the lathe anyway. I'm open to painting it another color. However, I may just clean it, put the parts on and have it look mismatched for awhile. "Frankenlathe!"
 

mickri

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If you have a bathroom scale you can get the weight of your lathe. Make three spacers out of wood or whatever that are the same height as the scale. Put the scale under one leg and the spacers under the other three. Then swap the scale from one leg to the next recording the weight at each leg. Add them up and you will have the weight of your lathe. Or if you have 4 scales put one under each leg.
 

wa5cab

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12. We don't have an accurate figure for the actual weight of any of the lathes. However, the Craftsman Power Tools catalogs do give the shipping weights. The shipping weight of a complete (new) Craftsman 12x36 101.07403 is 290 lb. That weight includes the weight of the wood crate it was shipped in, maybe 50 lb +/-, and the weight of the MOLO, the remaining 10 Change Gears that were shipped loose (not mounted on the lathe), and a few relatively light accessories that came with the basic lathe, probably no more than 5 or 10 lb. The accessories are listed in any of the catalog ads. And specifically which gears were shipped loose are shown as a stack of 10 gears on the same parts manual page as shows the headstock.

Note that the 10F is a little lighter than the 07403 because its height is 1" less than the 12", all of which is cast iron.

Commenting on mickri's suggestion of weighing each corner and adding them, the legs don't really lend themselves to doing that. I wouldn't believe the results unless four scales were used. However, a spacer block at one end and the scales at the other would. The actual weight would be the sum of the two readings. And to answer the rental question, yes you should be able to rent a crane scale and if you don't have one, an engine hoist able to left the scale with the lathe attached to it. But the flat (bathroom) scales and spacer method would give as good a result and be cheaper.
 
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wa5cab

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13. Sears seemed to cycle through various colors for each year. I've never heard of anyone coming up with any accepted name for each color. So if you want the replacement parts to be the same color as the original lathe parts (which is a reasonable wish), your only option is to have the color matched. But it wouldn't hurt anything to ask the shop doing the matching to tell you the closest commercially available match, if any.
 

Superburban

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Rustoleum makes a dark metallic grey, or metallic black (Can't remember the name), that is a close fit to the dark color that Sears used in the 80, but has a nice metallic touch to it. I've done a couple of tools with it, but the only pic I can find on this computer, is the air cleaner in my Ramcharger. Not a great pic, but you can get the idea. Check it out, you may like it.


0424141918-01.jpg
 

pontiac428

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I didn't even think about the spindles! DOH! I have several tang-style MT#3 tapers that fit. They are pretty rough on the surface; any way to clean them up?
I am sure somebody will read this and spit their breakfast cereal all over their screen. This is what I did, and I got good results. Tapers go in tight and come out easy now, and that was my objective. I bought a #2 and #3 Morse reamer, put it in the bore of the head/tailstock, supported the free end in center, and did my thing. It worked out well.


(from mobile)
 

ARC-170

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I have the two lathes I bought set up next to each other. I'm going to start removing parts from the "donor/old" machine and putting them on the "recipient/new" machine. The plan right now is to clean them just good enough for disassembly and re-assembly, then see if everything works, what is missing/needs fixing/etc, then take the machine apart (again) and do a thorough cleaning job and possibly a re-paint (the two machines are different colors). This may change as I go, however.

TAILSTOCK
14. I removed the tail stock ram lock assembly (#M6-44, M6-45, 1/4-20 bolt) from the donor, but am having a hard time getting it to go on the recipient. It came off the donor easily enough, but It fits very tight on the recipient so it's really hard to rotate the lock sleeve and lock pieces to get them to line up so the ram can slide in. I'm guessing the new machine needs cleaning then lubing in that area. Is there anything I need to know or am missing?
15. What grease/oil is used on the lock sleeves and/or the bolt?
16. I was going to use machine oil on the ram. Is this correct?

CARRIAGE
17. Any trick to removing the carriage? I assume I remove the two large Phillips head screws on top and slide it off, but are there any tricks or anything I should know before I take it apart? I want to inspect the backside because I think the mitre gear (#10F-82A) is missing/broken on my machine. I found the part in a box so I made this assumption and want to confirm. The 10F-84 knob (engages screw feed, correct?) is also missing, so there may be more broken/missing parts when I take it apart.

And so it begins.
 

wa5cab

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15. Do not use grease on the tailstock ram lock parts. Over time, it will harden and cause trouble (just as it will in the spindle bearings in the headstock). Use the same SAE 20 ND or ISO 68 oil as used almost everywhere else on the lathe.

14. If the ram lock cylinders will not fit into the other tailstock, probably the surface of the hole has a coating of varnish due to years of drying out time of the oil that should be used there. One solution would be to slit a length of 3/8" diameter drill rod, mount it in your drill press along with the tailstock (on the table) and slip about 1" of 400 or 600 grit wet-or-dry sand paper into the slit and spin that in the hole briefly.

16. Yes, SAE 20 as most everywhere else on the lathe.

17. The two large Phillips head screws attach the apron to the front of the saddle. If you only want to remove the carriage from the bed, it is not necessary to remove the apron. But it will reduce the weight somewhat. Remove the carriage dovetail chip guard. Crank the cross slide off the end of the cross feed screw and slide the cross slide off of the dovetail. Slide the tailstock off the end of the bed. Remove the lead screw and its right bearing. Crank the carriage off the end of the bed, catching the carriage gib if it falls out. You may have to loosen the carriage gib somewhat if there is much wear on the rear of the rear way. It may be just as well to go ahead and remove the carriage gib before sliding the carriage off of the bed. If the carriage still goes tight near the end of the bed, loosen but do not remove the four screws attaching the front and rear bearing plates to the bottom of the carriage. And yes on the 10F-84 Knob engaging the power cross feed. Except that it seems to have been re-numbered as 441-060.
 
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ARC-170

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14. I cleaned the tailstock hole and all the pieces with Simple Green, a red Scotchbrite pad and a round brush and filed the burrs off and got the sleeves to fit without getting stuck. However, there are 2 different tail stocks. I pulled the locking assembly off the one on the bottom, but my lathe tailstock is shown on top. The hole is smaller on mine than the old one so I cannot stack the sleeves in the hole (it's a bigger diameter from the underside). They have the same part number on the castings. The parts diagram I have for my lathe shows a tailstock like the bottom one:
tailstock comparison.jpg

I can either have just one sleeve, switch tailstocks, or shorten the sleeves. Thoughts? I found some extra sleeves with my lathe that are the same length as the ones shown. My tailstock is in better condition cosmetically, but they both appear to be functional.

Here is the locking assembly showing the sleeves:
tailstock lock assy.jpg

15-16. Noted. I used machine oil after cleaning these with Simple Green and a rag.

17. The Phillips heads would not budge. I sprayed penetrating oil on them a few days ago, too. I was able to get the carriage off as follows:
-Unscrew the leadscrew bearing bolts (the ones holding it to the bed on the right side) and remove the nut and washer on the end.
-I removed the bolt holding the leadscrew drive gear on the left.
-I gently tapped the bearing and the whole leadscrew came off. I discovered this by accident when I was trying to get just the bearing off. I wasn't able to get just the bearing off the leadscrew. It was probably better this way anyway since I would have had to support the leadscrew at one end.
This allowed me to slide off the carriage.
 

ARC-170

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HEADSTOCK
18. I switched out the belt guards. While doing this, I oiled the bearings on both lathes. Mine still is "crunchy" and doesn't rotate smoothly. In fact, I can't get it to rotate at all. The oil all dripped out on the table. The other lathe runs really smooth and little or no oil dripped out. Am I looking at switching out the bearings of these two machines? Or should I buy new bearings? Thoughts?
 

wa5cab

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18. It's possible that some misguided soul packed the bearings with grease which over the years has hardened and is caked around the outer part of the bearings and is keeping oil from getting to them.

14. This is the first case that I've heard of where the hole for the ram locks is too small. Or maybe you mean that the hole is too shallow. Please measure the diameters or the depths of the two holes and report it here.
 

ARC-170

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12. I'll try the scale method and see what I get. I'm afraid I might drop the lathe on the scale and break it, though. I might need a hanging scale anyway to weigh the parts from the donor lathe I'm going to try to sell.

13. The local auto paint store has auto paint only that is about $50 a quart. I might be able to get a pint, but that might not be enough. Rattle can paint is about $4/can. I might spay polyester primer/surfacer on the cast iron to seal it up and smooth it out, then spray color over that. A smoother finish will be easier to clean. I want to wait and see how many parts of each lathe I use before I decide on a color. I got blue, dark gray and aqua parts. I'll probably want to dismantle the whole thing to paint it, but I hear that it is not a good idea to remove the headstock. Is this true?

14. This is the first case that I've heard of where the hole for the ram locks is too small. Or maybe you mean that the hole is too shallow. Please measure the diameters or the depths of the two holes and report it here.

My report (I got homework?! What the...?):p

Here's a rough, approximately to scale, sketch of a section view through the oil cup and locking sleeve holes showing the differences. The measurements are close, but not to 0.001". Mine is like "B". The donor lathe is like "A".
lathe tailstock sketch.jpg
Should I switch tailstocks? I have a (small) milling machine so maybe I could bore out the hole to fit the sleeves. This scares me; I don't have enough experience to get it perfect. I could also make the sleeves shorter in length. Thoughts? How would I determine which tailstock is better? Is the tailstock matched to the lathe?

18. So I have to take them out to clean the grease out or at least see what the issue is, correct?
 
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wa5cab

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14. Wow! When you wrote earlier that the hole for the tailstock ram lock in your Tailstock "B" was too small for the lock cylinders, I had no idea it was "REALLY" too small. 0.26" diameter!!! I've forgotten whether you had answered this before. Did the "B" tailstock have a pair of lock cylinders installed in it?

The earliest actual 10" parts list that we have found is on the 10E. The 10E is a stripped down 10D with headstock, carriage, compound and tailstock but with no back gears or threading capability. We do not have an actual 10D parts list. But the 10E list says that the tailstock is 10D-5. 10D-5 is also used on the 10F up through end of production in 1957. This would seem to imply that your tailstock "B" is a 10-5.

I know that the tailstock spacer or riser block has or will have 10D-6 cast into it. Does the actual "B" tailstock casting have a number cast into it?

As to whether or not you should switch tailstocks, I'm not yet sure. But unless you make "B" look like "A", probably.

18. Short answer is yes except that unless you are replacing it with a new one, it is not necessary to remove the right spindle bearing cone from the spindle. And unless you are replacing either or both, it is not necessary to remove either spindle bearing cup from the headstock. And it is not necessary to remove either of the inner spindle bearing dust covers.
 

ARC-170

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14. It did not have a tailstock lock on it when I got it, but I found the sleeves in a box of parts that came with the lathe. The 1/4" bolt fits in the top hole, but there isn't enough space in the larger diameter area to fit the sleeves, unless they are shortened.

They are both 10D-6.

Is mine some rare/limited production/mistake? Can I sell it for $1,000,000,000! Ha! At this point the plan is to clean up both tailstocks and see which one is better. I'll wait and see if we get any more info about the small hole vs big hole.
-----------
I thought I'd ask before I attempted anything:

19. How do I pull the tailstock handwheel bearing out? Is it threaded or press fit? It would make it easier to clean and paint the tailstock if it was out. I could leave it in, I suppose, and used tape to cover it for painting.

20. Is detaching the base from the tailstock a big deal? Does it cause re-alignment issues when I re-assemble it?
 
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14. 10D-6 is the base with the two backset adjust screws front and back. The tailstock is only the casting that fits on the base. Somewhere on it should be 10D-5 on the newer one and something else, maybe 10-5, on the older one. If you decide to use the older one that the larger hole doesn't go through to the top, you should first either bore the hole through to the top or have someone else do it for you. Unfortunately, although it may be quite rare, it ain't worth a bazillion dollars. Sorry. :p

19. The tailstock feed screw bearing screws into the casting but after more than half a century it may be difficult to remove. Soaking it in penetrating oil won't hurt and might help.

20. Short answers are no and yes. But the backset is one of the things that you would check before starting to use the lathe, anyway. To separate the tailstock from the base, remove the two slotted screws. Invert the assembly and soak the part of the tailstock that slides across the 10D-6 base in penetrating oil. Periodically, tap on the side of the base with a wood or other nonmetallic mallet. Eventually, it will come loose. Once you get the lathe back together, one of the first things that you should do anyway is to check the back set of the tailstock compared to the spindle. The MOLO has a paragraph on re-setting the backset to zero. Basically, you mount a test bar between centers, cut a little on each end, and adjust the backset and repeat until the two diameters are the same. Before you start whittling, you mount a dead center in spindle and ram and adjust the backset until the two appear to touch. Then start with the test bar.
 
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