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Atlas 10 x 30, first steps to using lathe & setup

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oldschoolcane

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Finally got the lathe loaded onto my work bench, have some really basic questions about first steps to get this lathe up and running?
What type of belt do I need to find for this lathe? Any recommendations on how to clean the lathe up? Is there any source for a wiring diagram for the lathe, the wiring was cut when I picked the machine up, I'll try to get a picture of the existing wiring.

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pontiac428

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First step is definitely to go through the lathe and inspect the parts for damage, function, and wear. Clean and lubricate everything per the chart. For cleaning, you can use anything from simple green (butyl cellosolv type cleaners) to mineral spirits, whatever suits you.

The next thing I would do is adjust the spindle and gibs as outlined in the MOLO. Then I would set up the change gears to something around .005-.010 feed, just for starting out and seeing how things work.

You can use a link belt (Fenner, powertwist, etc) for both belts. Sized belts will vary depending on your setup, since the motor and belt countershaft might be set up differently on the bench than mine.

I think if you made it this far, you can start turning some test pieces to see how it works. Follow the manual and reinforce your understanding with some youtube videos before you put power to it.

This is a short answer to a short question, so I am sure others will chime in.
 

markba633csi

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Show us the loose ends of the wiring, it shouldn't be too hard to piece it back together
Mark
 

wa5cab

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cane,

If you want suggestions of how to clean up the lathe, you really need to post photos of the machine. They would also answer at least some of the other questions.

But first, there are two ways in which to specify the size of an Atlas lathe (or if your audience is familiar with the make,any lathe). The most common is to specify the swing and the approximate maximum distance between centers. Note that in the US and territories, swing is the approximate diameter of the largest diameter piece that you can somehow attach to the spindle and not have it hit the ways. In Britain and most of the Commonwealth, the swing is half of that, or the rounded down to the nearest half inch of the distance from the spindle down to the top of the ways. For practical reasons, most makers will have the actual value of either method be just slightly larger than the stated value.

As I am familiar with the Atlas machines, I know that they never made a 10x48. So you must have a 48" long bed. Which means that the lathe is a 10x30. In order to determine which belts you need, we will need to know the model number and/or the Series number. Which photos might answer. Up until 1945, Atlas sold whatever was the current Series (letters <blank> through F) with either of two types of countershaft, called Vertical and Horizontal. They each require different belt lengths. Briefly, the Vertical countershafts have their main bracket attached to ether the headstock, bed or rear of the left leg. In the case of all of the Atlas 10 inch lathes, the Horizontal countershaft is always attached to the top of the stand or bench that the lathe legs are attached to. And for the belt numbers to work, the bracket must be attached the correct distance behind the lathe. This location is shown on documents in Downloads.

Finally, there are two types of belts that will work, known as V-belts and Link belts. Each type has advantages and disadvantages. And each is available in qualities ranging from near-junk to excellent, which usually means with costs from cheap to not-cheap. However, almost every time that the drive belt subject comes up here or in any other forum or on any other list, the thread devolves into an argument between those who like Link belts and those who don't. So anyone who tries to start up that argument again will have his or her first post deleted. Second or subsequent posts will be treated in the same way as political or sex posts and the member may be either moderated or banned. Whichever you decide to use, you will need to know the length. And the FHP V-belt part numbers give that. So when we know what your lathe needs, I or someone will post the factory belt numbers. If you are already familiar with link and V-belts, fine. If you aren't, do a search in only this Forum for "link-belt' and you can read some of the previous discussions and arguments.
 

oldschoolcane

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Here are a couple of pictures that include the wiring ends. The first picture is the wiring coming from the lathe. The second picture shows the wiring end coming from the lathe on the left and the wiring end coming from the motor?

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wa5cab

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The insulation on the cord from the appears to be bad (the photo appears to show a crack in the insulation where the white wire comes out of the cord). So that cord should be replaced before you attempt to apply power. The cord coming from the motor with black, white and green insulation looks OK but you should confirm that it isn't stiff and subject to cracking. If it is, replace that one as well.

The two conductors coming from the lathe should just go to the motor switch. When you replace it, especially as the lathe appears to me mounted on wood, you should use a 3-conductor cord with the third (green) wire connected to the headstock somehow.

Confirm that the green wire from the motor goes to the motor frame. Presumably the black wire goes to one side of the RUN winding(s) and to one side of the START circuit. And the white wire goes to the other side of the RUN winding(s) and to the other side of the START circuit. If that is correct, you will need to mount a separate junction box on the stand as a place to connect the switch cord, motor cord and line cord.

On the other hand, if the black or white motor cord wire is loose inside of the motor junction box, then the loose end of the motor cord should have an AC 3-pin line plug attached to the three wires. The switch cord should go to the motor, with one wire tied to the loose line cord conductor and the other one connected to the unconnected sides of the RUN and START circuits.
 
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