Atlas Horizontal Mill

JPMacG

Active User
H-M Supporter - Silver Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2014
Messages
604
Interesting how availability is so regional. Atlas mills show up on Craigslist regularly around here (eastern PA).
 

ErichKeane

Making scrap at ludicrous speed.
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
1,769
Hah, yikes! I regret posting that now :) I'd seen it on our local craigslist for a while, and it looked like someone had at least gone over it to clean/paint it, I hadn't looked close enough to see how rough it was!
 

Dabbler

Administrator
Staff member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2016
Messages
2,140
The table t-slot has a bust-out too.
well spotted! Notice that you can't see the spindle or belt configuration. Many of the machines in our area are not great, but none as bad as this one looks....
 

wlburton

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
211
This is what they're supposed to look like!
1618176010802.png
 

topcat41468

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2020
Messages
43
I found a MH mill for 1100. I was hoping to find an MFC. But i am unsure of the level of control with the level system vs a lead screw in terms of both feed speed and dimensional control.
 

francist

Active User
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
2,354
I think if you may find it frustrating if you’re thinking of using the machine in a conventional way. The lever arrangement is really meant for limited and repetitive action — say running a small part through a pair of slitting blades to quickly cut two slots and then changing in another part to repeat the operation over again — and trying to perform normal milling operations with that setup could be pretty challenging. I imagine it could be done, but i don’t think it would be ideal. Having said that, I’ve not used a lever-operated machine so have no firsthand experience. My MF has the normal lead screws and feed mechanism, but I think there may be someone on the forum who does have a lever machine so hopefully he sees this and can comment.

-frank
 

topcat41468

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 5, 2020
Messages
43
I think if you may find it frustrating if you’re thinking of using the machine in a conventional way. The lever arrangement is really meant for limited and repetitive action — say running a small part through a pair of slitting blades to quickly cut two slots and then changing in another part to repeat the operation over again — and trying to perform normal milling operations with that setup could be pretty challenging. I imagine it could be done, but i don’t think it would be ideal. Having said that, I’ve not used a lever-operated machine so have no firsthand experience. My MF has the normal lead screws and feed mechanism, but I think there may be someone on the forum who does have a lever machine so hopefully he sees this and can comment.

-frank
that's consistent with what I have envisioned.
 

wlburton

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
211
I found a MH mill for 1100. I was hoping to find an MFC. But i am unsure of the level of control with the level system vs a lead screw in terms of both feed speed and dimensional control.
Well, I'm still thinking about selling my MFC, but it would be considerably more expensive than the one you found. No shipping charge, though!
 

AGCB97

H-M Supporter - Diamond Member
H-M Lifetime Diamond Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Messages
717
I have one salvaged from a defunct machine shop. I don't know what it is other than Atlas and lever operated X axis. It also does not have overarm support. Don't know what I'm going to do with it but I'm about 7 hours (I think) from Minneapolis.
I'll try to post some pics. I believe I'd ask less than $500.
Aaron
 

vtcnc

Admin
Staff member
H-M Lifetime Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
2,539
I found a MH mill for 1100. I was hoping to find an MFC. But i am unsure of the level of control with the level system vs a lead screw in terms of both feed speed and dimensional control.
Lever operated rack controls are designed for single, repetitive, roughing operations: planing, slotting, dovetailing, etc. They can be precise operations but are typically used for for first, roughing operations.

Dial operated lead screw controls are designed for multi-axis operations: pocketing, stepping, patterns, etc. They are by nature precise due to the dial/leadscrew fidelity and can be dual purposed as roughing machines. Finishing operations with precise cuts can be achieved with dial/leadscrew operated machines.

Unless you have a product you are selling that requires a fast, simple roughing operation - I would stay away from a lever operated machine. However, if you are simply curious, nostalgic or purely in it for the hobby-collector factor, a lever operated machine makes a lot of sense.
 
It can take up to an hour for ads to appear on the page. See our code implementation guide for more details. If you already have Auto ad code on your pages there's no need to replace it with this code
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock