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Beginner cutting tools to get with my lathe.

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Dutch Platypus

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#1
Hi Everyone,

I'm about to order my first lathe (PM-1030V) and I'm trying to determine what I should get for cutting tools. The shop I'm ordering the lathe from (Precision Matthews) offers some nice kits with carbide inserts for the AXA tool post so I'm tempted to add them in but I would love to know whether that is a good decision. Is there a sweet spot for the price/quality ratio?

Tlhanks for any input you can provide,
Edwin van Doorn
 

David S

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#2
Hi Edwin, To help us a bit more, do you have any particular types of metals that you will mostly be working with?

David
 

Dutch Platypus

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Hi David,
At first i will probably be working mostly with Aluminum, Brass and various plastics.
Best Regards,
Edwin
 

David S

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#4
Well I am only a hobbyist clock repair person. I work mostly with aluminum, brass and some plastics as well. For these I like sharp HSS tools for a lot of stuff, and I also use carbide inserts as well. I am sure you will get more feedback based on your particular machine and tool holder.

David
 

P. Waller

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#5
It is not possible to know what tooling is needed until one has the particular job details. Buy or grind only the tools required for the work.
 

tweinke

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#6
Consider HSS tools also, relatively inexpensive, sharpenable at home and can be ground to many different shapes as needed. There is a nice thread on here on just that topic.
 

mikey

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#7
Ed, you need tools to learn to use your new lathe. While I agree completely with Todd re HSS tools, I also understand that you will be anxious to get started.

I think the 3/8" turning/boring set PM sells is an outstanding bargain. RH, LH and boring bar plus inserts for $69.00 is a steal. These are the SCLCX type tool holders so better inserts will be readily available on ebay.

Another option is the HSS version of these tools and inserts from AR Warner. Here is the equivalent set from them: http://www.arwarnerco.com/p-12-kit-8-38-inch-turning-c-right-hand-left-hand-and-boring-bar.aspx. Note the price difference. For that, you get well made tool holders and re-sharpenable HSS inserts that will work better at the lower speeds your lathe can achieve. These tool holders will also accept CCMT and CCGT carbide inserts that are readily available on ebay.

Of course, you can buy the PM set and also buy CEMW HSS inserts from AR Warner to fit them to lower your costs.

As Todd said, in the long run your best bet is to learn to grind your own HSS tools but that will come if/when you're ready for it. Those of us who grind tools are well beyond the beginning where you are now but we remember when we started - congratulations, and welcome to HM!
 

428Bird

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#8
I have a ton of HSS and carbide brazed tooling that I will give you if you pay shipping. I'm tired of tripping over it.

It's all 3/8 and smaller.

Britt

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

Glenn Brooks

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#9
+1 for the HSS tool bits. You’ll need a small 6” or 8” bench grinder to grind the tools to the right form. But there’s no end of examples and How to’s to learn how to do it on line. Mikey even made up some large wood tooling examples he can send you to show you the shape.

Nothing wrong with carbide, just a mystery to me how the inserts are used, as there are hundreds if not thousands of different shapes, all with unintelligible coded numbers. Why mess with all of that when HSS will work brilliantly for you, for ever, and for cheap!

Glenn
 

Dutch Platypus

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Hi Everyone,

First off, thank you for all your feedback. I definitely get that HSS is a great way to get started and I also like the idea to learn how to sharpen and shape my own tools so I’ll be headed that way. 428Bird, I’ll PM you to find out more about your offer for your tools.

Best Regards,
Edwin
 

macardoso

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#11
My personal favorite is a CCMT insert holder: http://www.shars.com/products/index...-small-screw-lock-positive-insert-tool-holder

You can put CCGX polished inserts in it which cut aluminum beautifully. They aren't too expensive and as long as you don't keep crashing the machine should last forever. I use this for 99% of my square OD turning. The same inserts also fit some small to medium sized boring bars, so not a bad investment. I prefer carbide for the consistency of tool even though I know how to grind HSS.

This combo is not too expensive.
 

vocatexas

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#12
When I first got started I found grinding HSS tools intimidating and procrastinated for a while before trying it. I read a lot of forum posts and watched videos (especially Mr. Pete and Abom 79) to get an idea of how to grind tools. After trying a few grinds I realized it isn't that hard and the shapes, for the most part, don't have to be dead on. The main thing is to make sure you have clearance anywhere the tool might drag on the work. There really isn't any voodoo or black magic involved.

Enjoy your new lathe!
 

Jimsehr

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#13
I have no problem grinding tools carbide or HSS. But if I was looking for a started set of tools I would try a set from Banggood. They have a carbide set of 7 insert tools for less then 40 bucks shipped. Right and left hand turning tools ,a threading insert tool . And a cutoff tool with insert and two boring bars with inserts. When I had my own shop one bore bar used to cost more then the set.
 

Dutch Platypus

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Hi Everyone,

Thanks again for all your feedback. I chose to get the AXA tool set from Precision Matthews since it appeared to be a good deal to go with the AXA tool post that comes installed on the lathe. For any other tools, I will definitely start with HSS and learn to grind my own. Shops like Banggood appear to provide some nice cheap options to learn how not to do it before trying my hand on better parts. I appreciate all your feedback and I look forward to the learning curve ahead (I have used lathes before on occasion, I just never owned one).

Best Regards,
Edwin
 

428Bird

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#15
Hi Everyone,

Thanks again for all your feedback. I chose to get the AXA tool set from Precision Matthews since it appeared to be a good deal to go with the AXA tool post that comes installed on the lathe. For any other tools, I will definitely start with HSS and learn to grind my own. Shops like Banggood appear to provide some nice cheap options to learn how not to do it before trying my hand on better parts. I appreciate all your feedback and I look forward to the learning curve ahead (I have used lathes before on occasion, I just never owned one).

Best Regards,
Edwin
Here is what I have to give you, if you want it. Just pay shipping if you don't mind. There are some new brazed carbide of varying tips, new and used HSS also of varying sizes.

Britt


Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

Dutch Platypus

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Here is what I have to give you, if you want it. Just pay shipping if you don't mind. There are some new brazed carbide of varying tips, new and used HSS also of varying sizes.

Britt


Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
Hi Britt, I PM'ed you.
Edwin
 

P. Waller

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#17
As an example, if given this part to make next year would you have thought this year to stock internal and external grooving tools less the .065" in width, assorted concave and convex radius OD turning tools, a boring bar that will fit into a 1 1/4 inch bore and go 6" deep and an X sized drill bit?

For this reason buy or make what is required when need arises and before long you will have more tools then you have drawers to keep them in(-:
testpart.jpg
 

Dutch Platypus

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#18
As an example, if given this part to make next year would you have thought this year to stock internal and external grooving tools less the .065" in width, assorted concave and convex radius OD turning tools, a boring bar that will fit into a 1 1/4 inch bore and go 6" deep and an X sized drill bit?

For this reason buy or make what is required when need arises and before long you will have more tools then you have drawers to keep them in(-:
View attachment 266109
Point well taken. I’m not looking to gather unnecessary bits and I certainly don’t know anything about future project needs nor do I have unlimited funding
 

Aaron_W

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#19
It looks like they cover the basics fairly well, but a drill chuck for the tail stock would be nice to have.

I've not done a whole lot with my lathe but that is something that has already proved itself handy several times. Unfortunately it looks like PM is sold out of the one they offer.
 

Dutch Platypus

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It looks like they cover the basics fairly well, but a drill chuck for the tail stock would be nice to have.

I've not done a whole lot with my lathe but that is something that has already proved itself handy several times. Unfortunately it looks like PM is sold out of the one they offer.
Yeah, that and a live center are two parts I’ll probably be looking for sooner than later.
 

P. Waller

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#21
Point well taken. I’m not looking to gather unnecessary bits and I certainly don’t know anything about future project needs nor do I have unlimited funding
This has nothing to do with funding.
Your question is:

I'm about to order my first lathe (PM-1030V) and I'm trying to determine what I should get for cutting tools.

You will not know what tools you will need until you have a part to make, if indeed you do not know what you will be making there is no way to determine in advance what tool works well and no one can give you advice.
If your hobby is making pens in wood this will require different tools then making fly fishing reels in stainless.
 

mikey

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You will not know what tools you will need until you have a part to make, if indeed you do not know what you will be making there is no way to determine in advance what tool works well and no one can give you advice.
Edwin says he will be mainly working with ...

At first i will probably be working mostly with Aluminum, Brass and various plastics.
Since this is his first lathe and he needs to learn basic lathe operations like turning and facing, can we not give him a basic idea of the tools that will allow him to do that? Personally, I see nothing wrong with turning a piece of stock into chips while he learns to use the lathe and basic turning/parting tools will allow that.
 
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