[4]

Blind Hole Bearing Puller Tool

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#1
Guys do these work?I would like to use it to remove some needle roller bearings for the Colchester?
s-l225.jpg
 

seasicksteve

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2014
Messages
146
Likes
93
#2
Never tried a puller like that. I have used hydraulic method ( grease and tight fitting shaft) to remove bearings with good results
 

kvt

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 21, 2014
Messages
2,008
Likes
997
#3
I also have use the hydraulic method, but have also used one of the ones that have little gripers that grip the inside of the bushing and the slide hammer to pull it out. Never used it on a bearing and wander how it would work as you have to put a lot of pressure on the bearings to get it to grip, thus putting pressure outward toward the hole locking it in place more. Also if the ends of the bearing are not strong enough it could cause the end to give and all you remove is the needles and then have to get the case out.
 

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#4
Educate me on hydraulic method.Guessing pack it full of grease then
 

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#5
Thanks guys well never tried or heard of the hydraulic method but it sure sounds like it will work.Take a look at the pics,the small at the bottom is thread so I could plug it. DSC02823.JPG

DSC02822.JPG
 

Ed ke6bnl

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
491
Likes
210
#6
I watched a guy use the hydraulic method with no success and for real, mashed up and soaked bread worked far better.
 

kd4gij

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Messages
4,590
Likes
1,777
#7
I have you both the tool and hydraulic method with good results with both. While the hydraulic method is free I never pass up a good reason to buy a new tool.
 
D

Deleted member 473

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#8
The needle bearing looks fine to me. Just being nosey, why do you want to pull the needle bearing?
 

Billh50

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 26, 2015
Messages
1,924
Likes
1,431
#9
I haven't tried the hydraulic method but have only used teh HF puller with some minor stock removal to fit jaw under the bearing well.
image_17892.jpg
 

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#10
Thanks guys and please do be nosey,well I figure since I had the lathe taken apart I would just go ahead and replace them since they are 1965 bearings.The new ones were about 6.00 or so which were not to expensive compared to Clausing so I though I would just replace them.Your right they do look good but I have no knowledge of the lathe from the previous owner other than being told it was a working lathe.I'm sure that the 1965 bearings are better made than todays bearings but they still are 1965 bearings.Should I or shouldn't I replace them?The bearings that I want to replace,I don't want to work my tail off just to get them out,want to be civil about it and not barbaric about it( little humor)
 
D

Deleted member 20190

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#11
If the bearings and their mating shafts look good, I would not bother replacing them. If they've been in there for fifty years and have not failed, they will probably continue to perform just fine for the next fifty.
 

joshua43214

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
658
Likes
464
#12
When I was a mechanic, I pulled countless blind bearings. Pilot bearings in particular have a bad habit of getting really stuck.
I have use pullers with legs, blind bearing pullers (I have a very expensive and very well made German kit), and the "hydraulic" method.
By far the easiest and most reliable is the hydraulic method. Blind hole pullers are the least effective on bearings like you pictured. The cage tends to collapse and it just pulls the needles out, and you are left with a mess. Pullers work best on bushings or outer races. I have had them pull the inner race right off the outer.

Legged pullers are next to useless unless the bearing will more or less slide out with very little effort.
Even with factory made blind pullers, the results are intermittent. Some times it works well, other times the puller just makes a huge mess out of the bearing. Once a blind hole puller has done it's damage, about the only way to remove the bearing it to carefully split it.

It is best to always start with the hydraulic method.
carefully pack the hole with general purpose grease, try to get as few air bubbles in it as possible. just keep putting it in there, and packing it down with a drift punch or dowel. Fill it all the way up. Line up a drift that fills the hole as close as possible, and hit it with a really hard sharp blow with a large hard steel hammer (a ball peen is best). It is a good idea to hold the drift with a punch holder, it really sucks when you miss the drift and hit your hand. Wear goggle, or better yet a full face shield. Sometimes the grease will spray, and it is usually very hot.
I have had stuck bearings come out with so much force the grease smokes, and the part is too hot to touch.

Your bearing looks to be in good shape, it should come right out of there. There are other alternatives I would pursue before buying a tool that will see almost no use. There is no reason you could not clamp it in the mill, run a boring head down far enough to clean off the end, remove the needles, then bore the cage out so it is only a couple thou thick. You can then peel what is left out easily with a pick and needle nose pliers.
 

Smithdoor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
435
Likes
79
#13
The bearing pullers just will not work in some places
Some times I have to make dowel to fit the bushing or bearing and fill the hole with oil and hit the the dowel
Note: use a rag around the dowel or the oil will fly


Dave
 

joshua43214

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
658
Likes
464
#14
...
I'm sure that the 1965 bearings are better made than todays bearings but they still are 1965 bearings.
...
Quite the opposite actually. A good Timken or NSK will be of higher quality that the bearings from 1965.
Not everything was better back in the good old days. In fact most things were worse. All we see today is the good stuff that lasted through the years...
 

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#15
Guys thanks for all your thoughts on this and I will be passing on the tool.I guess they are kinda like fishing lures,look good like they will work but the only catch is the person that brought it.I think that I will just stick with the bearings that in there.I will need to replace one but its already out in pieces just like what has been describe.The bearings that I purchase is INA made here in the states,but don't know if they are any good.Thanks for all the replys
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
42
Likes
4,570
#16
INA bearings are very good industrial quality bearings.
i have hundreds of them running in machines all over the west coast, right now as we speak.

i might reiterate others' sentiments by saying, don't fix something that ain't broke.
if there is excessive heat, noise, vibration, poor operation, or failure - that's the time to get gung ho

conversely, the best way to learn something is to completely screw things up and then find a way to get yourself out of the hole you dug :bang head:

i guess it would depend on your intentions, in the depth of repairs.
personally i'll let a machine operate until it tells me otherwise,
then once it has failed, i like to build it from the ground up- replacing anything and everything that is deficient.
i build machines for continuous duty, your needs may differ greatly
 

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#17

cascao

Active User
Registered
Joined
May 24, 2012
Messages
353
Likes
810
#18
Hydraulic method with paper towel

 

rusty reamer

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 2, 2015
Messages
9
Likes
1
#19
Hydraulic method with paper towel

I have a similar puller from HF. works well on bearing races that are pressed in with flange, like a pilot bearing or races of a motorcycle swing arm.
 

kvt

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 21, 2014
Messages
2,008
Likes
997
#20
I have not used oil for the hydraulic method, But have used lite weight grease. it helps as it will still provide the hydraulic action but will not push out around the shaft as easy. Have used it to take out many stuck pilot needle bearings along with bushings. IT is messy any way you go about it. That one looks like you would have to mount it on something in order to do the Hydraulic as it would just push out the back. I agree if it ain't broke don't mess with it, But inspect it very well, and if you find any defect on any needle or the shaft redo it.
 

T Bredehoft

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
2,691
Likes
2,077
#21
I dont believe the needle bearings can be removed hydraulically. That requires a solid bushing type bearing, no way for the grease to get out, other than pushing the bearing out. the cage of the needle bearings would leak like the proverbial sieve. Before considering removing the bearing I'd look at the shaft that runs in it. If it looks distressed, they it will need ground in addition to replacing the bearing.
 

joshua43214

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
658
Likes
464
#22
I dont believe the needle bearings can be removed hydraulically. That requires a solid bushing type bearing, no way for the grease to get out, other than pushing the bearing out. the cage of the needle bearings would leak like the proverbial sieve. Before considering removing the bearing I'd look at the shaft that runs in it. If it looks distressed, they it will need ground in addition to replacing the bearing.
It works just fine with needle bearings if you use wheel beating grease. They are common enough as pilot bearings on some cars. I have never used any thing but grease, I can't speak for other methods like bread or wet paper towels.
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
2,330
Likes
1,426
#24
Thank you all for this thread.
I'm rebuilding a Millrite for a friend.
I've got new gears in the knee, now working powerfeeds. The bearings on Z axis 3ph motor are audibly chunk-chunk when turned by hand.
I've not pulled bearings before. Thanks for the thread.

Daryl
MN
 

zmotorsports

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,494
Likes
897
#25
I have the style of blind bearing puller like you showed in your original post. I have used it for a couple of decades now mainly on motorcycles, but other items too. It works well IF, the interference fit is not too tight, the cage and rollers hold together in place and especially if there is a small flange on the inside. The hydraulic method works well also but again, if the interference fit is too tight this doesn't always work.

Mike.
 

Dranreb

Active User
Registered
Joined
Sep 20, 2012
Messages
558
Likes
161
#26
I found linseed oil window glazing putty works best on needle bearings, used it many times with bronze bushes as well, if they're really tight it feels and sounds like hitting solid metal with the drift, but never fails to move them.

Bernard
 

Ed ke6bnl

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
491
Likes
210
#27
glazing putty sound like the best alternativetive so far, just for maybes how about silly puddy ??
 

Dranreb

Active User
Registered
Joined
Sep 20, 2012
Messages
558
Likes
161
#28
Have in mind the forces involved here, unless the part is very big be sure to support the bearing housing on a solid metal base to prevent knocking out the end of the blind hole, Cast iron parts can easily be broken by using this method.

Bernard
 

Kroll

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 23, 2012
Messages
1,019
Likes
234
#29
Well dang,I had my mind all made up but now re-thinking it.The glazing compound sure sounds good besides the fantastic ideal of this method.Like Mike said its should be just an interference fit,I may just go ahead and just give it a try,what tha heck.Using this method if it don't work all I have to do is just clean up the mess.Like Daryl said this is a good learning post
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
2,330
Likes
1,426
#30
Sounds like the more non-compressible the liquid the more power it has.

Daryl
MN
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top