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Bonding all-thread to machine handle

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rd2012

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#1
I would like to bond a piece of all-thread to the handle, up to the nut, in the attached photo. I have tried Loctite but it didn't hold, even as I thought I had cleaned both the male and female threads with solvent. It is one of a pair of handles to hold down an adjustable fence for a (wood) shaper. The threads are right-hand, so of course it tightens down just fine, but when loosening the handle backs out leaving the treaded rod in place. Then I have to loosen the nut with a wrench. The other one is fine, it's just this one.

Any help is much appreciated. Thanks!

rd2012 DSC_0526.jpg
 

Latinrascalrg1

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#2
What color loc tite did you try? The Red formula will hold to the point that heat will be needed to break the bond if you would ever need to in The future.
 

rd2012

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What color loc tite did you try? The Red formula will hold to the point that heat will be needed to break the bond if you would ever need to in The future.
Latinrascalrg1,
First I tried the 'hand tool removeable' (blue?). That didn't work, so I tried the Red. Maybe I didn't have the threads as clean as need be, or as the Red was old, maybe it was bad? thanks for your help.
rd2012
 

Z2V

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#4
JB Weld if you have no reason to take it apart
 

Ed ke6bnl

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#5
pin it through the side
 

rd2012

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#6
Z2V, Ed ke6bnl,

Thanks for both suggestions. One or both would get me there!

rd2012
 

projectnut

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#7
Another suggestion would be to silver solder the parts together. If you do have to disassemble them just apply heat.
 

rd2012

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Another suggestion would be to silver solder the parts together. If you do have to disassemble them just apply heat.
thanks projectnut. rd2012
 

Dave Paine

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#9
Another vote for JB Weld. I have used this with threaded items in jigs and knobs. This will fill the gaps/slop between the threads.

Loctite and similar products works best with tighter fitting thread. If the thread has slop, I have needed to tighten down the thread using a nut so I get most of the air between the threads out. Loctite and similar products need a lack of oxygen to cure and do not work well if they have to fill gaps.
 

rd2012

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Another vote for JB Weld. I have used this with threaded items in jigs and knobs. This will fill the gaps/slop between the threads.

Loctite and similar products works best with tighter fitting thread. If the thread has slop, I have needed to tighten down the thread using a nut so I get most of the air between the threads out. Loctite and similar products need a lack of oxygen to cure and do not work well if they have to fill gaps.
thanks Dave, great info! rd2012
 

chips&more

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#11
Hi and welcome. When I read the stories that Loctite did not work, I scratch my head. Because in my many many decades of using the stuff I have found out that it is not a bad product. But rather, it was using the wrong Loctite or the instructions were not followed . Also, I would pay attention when they want you to use an Activator. AND what metals/materials respond to curing the Loctite! I would read the Loctite literature and then try their products again…Dave
 

Latinrascalrg1

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#12
Latinrascalrg1,
First I tried the 'hand tool removeable' (blue?). That didn't work, so I tried the Red. Maybe I didn't have the threads as clean as need be, or as the Red was old, maybe it was bad? thanks for your help.
rd2012
Yes if the red loc tite had been sitting in the garage or especially a place that gets hot and cold you can get a separation of the active ingredients and will not work correctly. Sometimes it can be shaken to remix but that depends on its condition and age. Ive used the red loc tite to successfully hold 2 round taped slip fit pieces of aluminum together strong enough to cause some twisting in the bars before the connection failed amongst other users so i don't see why it wouldn't work to hold in some all thread especially with also having a lock nut as part of your setup.
 

whitmore

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#13
I would like to bond a piece of all-thread to the handle
The Loctite line (Henkel actually) includes lots of adhesives; the green stuff is most appropriate for fixing
a threaded rod to a handle. I'd consider soft solder, brazing, or regular old two-part epoxy, too.
There's undoubtedly something appropriate in the adhesives box...

Old-school would be to drill through, ream, and fit a taper pin.
 

extropic

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#14
I didn't see mention of the thread size we're discussing but, for purposes of estimating scale, I'll guess 3/8-16. If so, it looks like you you have plenty of wall thickness on the handle to drill and tap for a setscrew to secure the stud and the assembly will remain easily serviceable. Use a bit of brass rod under the setscrew to bear on the stud (won't damage the threads on the stud).
 

jdedmon91

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#15
The Loctite line (Henkel actually) includes lots of adhesives; the green stuff is most appropriate for fixing
a threaded rod to a handle. I'd consider soft solder, brazing, or regular old two-part epoxy, too.
There's undoubtedly something appropriate in the adhesives box...

Old-school would be to drill through, ream, and fit a taper pin.
Go for the green because I’ve never had any to turn loose


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

rd2012

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#16
Thanks All for the great replies and solutions. Happy Fourth! rd2015
 

hman

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#17
You might find Rick Sparber's "Thermal Interference Fit Stud" article helpful. Implementing his idea will require either drilling and tapping your existing threaded hole more deeply, or maybe re-making the part:
http://rick.sparber.org/tfs.pdf
 

Cadillac STS

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#19
One option to solve the problem would be to start over and make the entire part from one piece of steel. Use the lathe to face down to your major thread diameter on one end and thread as far as you need. Drill the through hole on the other end for the handle as it is.

Put the threaded rod and body aside for another day, another project.
 

bluechips

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#20
You did not mention what type of solvent you used to clean. I like to use a solvent which leaves no residue such as brake-kleen. If your solvent is leaving any kind of residue the loc-tite will generally not work.
 

Latinrascalrg1

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#21
You did not mention what type of solvent you used to clean. I like to use a solvent which leaves no residue such as brake-kleen. If your solvent is leaving any kind of residue the loc-tite will generally not work.
Im sure you are probably already aware of this but just in case you aren't its something you should know about when using "Brake-Kleen".

Tetrachloroethylene (also called perchloroethylene or PERC) is a common ingredient used in Brake cleaning solvents. Its basically this chemical that gives brake kleen its good preformance as a cleaning solvent however If this chemical is heated to 315°F + ....you will convert it into "Phosgene gas" which is a pulmonary (choking) agent that was used very effectively as a chemical weapon during World War 1 and the fact that it only takes 4 parts per million to be fatal to me is just an accident waiting to happen.
Anyway this is just a word of caution if you choose to use "Brake-Kleen" it might be a good idea to buy the kind that no longer uses that chemical.
 
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