[4]

Bridgeport M Head - Getting Started

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

bpmhead

Mike Sawyer
Registered
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
8
Found a round ram Bridgeport M-Head for the garage. Base SN# 1898, M-Head SN# M3769. #7B&S Collet. 9x32 Table. I've used a quarter of a gallon of WD-40 thus far removing gunk. Added L510 VFD to convert garage 110 to 220 3phase for the motor to get it fired up. Added E32 collet holder since it seems the #7B&S hard to fine. This IS my first rodeo with a mill, so a few questions thus far:

1) The U shapped flaking is visible on the ways, but also a lot of surface stains. Blue scotch pads and WD40 don't seem to do much, but green scotch pads appears help with the stains but also maybe also removing those U marks. The OCD part of me wants to go to shiney, but maybe better to keep the flaking, stains and all on the ways?

2) Is there an equivalent rebuild guide for M head to the ones I've seen referenced a lot for M head? I picked up the m head rebuild kit from H&S but having found a thread yet where someone does the M head step by step. (answered below, thx!)

3) I presume the wheel in front is for fine quill feed, mine doesn't seem to work. I'm guessing using the knee to move piece up and down more common than fine quill feed? (answered below, thx!)

Been pouring through past threads here and else where, thanks so much for all that content!

1898_M3769.jpg
 
Last edited:

Ed ke6bnl

Brass
Registered
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
566
I have a round ram Bridgeport but has J head on it, I added power X axis and 3 axis dro, and is so nice ice now.enjoy your new tool
 

bpmhead

Mike Sawyer
Registered
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
8
Google search "Bridgeport M-head Manual PDF" and download it. Its out there for free.
Thank you. I had done similar searches and found some manuals with M head reference, but this turned up one I don't remember seeing before.

Added: ok, found a lot more stuff, so thank you.
 
Last edited:

Holescreek

Active User
Registered
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
799
Yeah, the "trick" with finding free manuals is to include "PDF" in your search. Every Bridgeport manual I've ever looked for is on the 'net for free.

My first Bridgeport was also an M-head with B&S #7 taper. I made some pretty heavy duty stuff with that head. Eventually I even made a full set of end mill holders for it up to 3/4" ID. Over time I started getting annoyed at having to manually feed the spindle down to bore holes (you have to screw the clutch knob in for the handwheel to engage) and replaced the m-head with a J-head using a home made adapter. I still use that BP nearly every day. Several years ago I picked up a second BP with a variable speed head just so I would be able to leave some accessories mounted to it's table to make setups easier.

Enjoy the mill, the M-head is tough enough to handle anything.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
6,691
See if you can buy a few B&S 7 collets in common tool shank sizes like 3/8, 1/2, and 5/8" and then equip your tooling with straight shanks to fit the collets. It will be better than having a full set of collets, and the tooling will fit other machines as well...
 

bpmhead

Mike Sawyer
Registered
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
8
See if you can buy a few B&S 7 collets in common tool shank sizes like 3/8, 1/2, and 5/8" and then equip your tooling with straight shanks to fit the collets. It will be better than having a full set of collets, and the tooling will fit other machines as well...
Yes, machine had 3/8 and 1/2, I was able to get a few others. But based on recommendation I saw somewhere, I got the ER32 collet holder in B&S 7, to make the collet changes fast/easy against that for most things. But then tooling yes straight shanks to use with either of those, glad your suggestion reinforces that direction, thanks!
 

bpmhead

Mike Sawyer
Registered
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
8
... (you have to screw the clutch knob in for the handwheel to engage) ...
Ah, ok, that's what I couldn't figure out. Clutch knob cranked all the way in, its reluctant but eventually engages. Loosened, it's still engages, but will eventually release. So maybe needs some attention. I had to buy a replacement wheel from H&M, there wasn't one with the machine, so I imagine handwheel wasn't used much, at least later in life.
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
3,443
I have a bunch of B&S #7 stuff, a set of draw in collets (unused) for end mills, an shell mill arbor and much more; if interested LMK and I can take and post some pics. york@napanet.net
 

bpmhead

Mike Sawyer
Registered
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
8
Hi BPM, welcome to the site and congrats on your mill.
Thank you. I'm excited to get started with something I've been waiting for a chance to get for quite a while. There's a ton of info here which is awesome.
 

Silverbullet

Gold
Registered
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
3,454
Thank you. I'm excited to get started with something I've been waiting for a chance to get for quite a while. There's a ton of info here which is awesome.
I just saw a couple collets on eBay , either, randc , or sfmsurplus , sellers they were I think $6 start for two .
 

bpmhead

Mike Sawyer
Registered
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
8
I just saw a couple collets on eBay , either, randc , or sfmsurplus , sellers they were I think $6 start for two .
I'm going to pick up a bunch of stuff tomorrow (from above), so will see where I'm at after that. Thank you for the heads up!
 

Shiseiji

Avid destroyer of many materials.
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 14, 2014
Messages
31
"If" you pull the feed apart, here is how to rewind the balance clock-spring. The secret is to have "something" over the spring to prevent it from jumping out as you wind it. This is a KISS make up of what clock-makers use to wind springs.
Required:
Bolt < 7/16" in diameter (the size of the quill shaft) , I used a 3/8" bicycle axle 'cause I have a bunch.
A rod to fit through a cross hole like a "C" clamp handle
4" square of 3 /4'" plywood
4 ~ 6" hose clamp capable of reducing to < 1-7/1 6" This is the diameter of the spring well.
~6" "mending plate" or ~6" long strap with holes in both ends sufficient to take a drywall or deck screw
5 ea. 1-1/14" drywall or deck screws
-------
Split the end of the bolt for a little over 1 /2" to capture the width of the spring.
Cross-drill the bolt ~ 2" from the split end
Drill a hole in the center of the plywood for the bolt.
Screw in 2 of the screws mid way between the hole and the board edge. These are to catch your handle.
Turn the board over and screw one end of the mending plate to just inside a corner of the plywood.

Set the hose clamp to it's maximum diameter and wind the spring by hand sufficiently to fit inside the hose clamp
Push the bolt through the plywood from the side with the single screw and, with the spring oriented to wind CCW, capture the inside of the spring.
Screw the mending plate down loosely over the hose clamp

Tighten the bolt to wind the spring. About every three winds tighten the hose clamp until the diameter is < 1-7/16"
Push the handle against one of the screws to prevent unwinding while you tighten the hose clamp.
I found friction held the outer spring fine against the hose clamp. If it slips badly, you can drill a hole for a #6 screw and use the head inside the clamp to hold the spring end. You will have to deal with unhooking it just as the last wrap is going into the spring well.
Remove the mending plate and lift off the hose clamp with the spring.
If necessary, carefully reshape the end of the spring that was held by the bolt.

Lower the quill all the way down, being careful not to jam the it against the feed pinion like I did . . .
With the spring oriented to wind CCW and the outside and of the spring set to slide into the spring well so it will engage the catch in the spring well , slip the inner end of the spring over the end of the shaft and hook it on the shaft catch.

Using the end of a flat top screwdriver, and starting from the inside, push the spring a wrap at a time from inside the hose clamp into the spring well.
If the outer end of the spring didn't catch on the well wall hook, you can disengage the inner spring end and carefully wind the spring to drag the outer end of the around till it catches then re -engage have the inner end. Caution, it's easy to bend the end of the spring.
 
[5] [7]
Top