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[4]

Broken Shaper fixed.

January Project of the Month [3]
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Dranreb

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#1
My Alba shaper clattered to a stop a couple of days ago, the part that connects the ram to the wibly wobbly yoke thingy had snapped clean off!

A cunning plan evolved and I set about a repair/modification, ironically making it using my shaper would have been much quicker than making it all on my lathe!

DSCF0951.jpg


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I drilled the oil hole after I took this pic.

Bernard
 

cg285

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#3
yes we do but in tradition his vocabulary is a bit strange. over here it's called a hexagonally inverted stelloid camsnapper
 

middle.road

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#4
'Wibbly, wobbly' I do believe comes from the vernacular of Doctor Who...
 

Dranreb

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#5
'Wibbly, wobbly' I do believe comes from the vernacular of Doctor Who...
I've done some checking and it seems that some times even the mighty Google is just too young to know everything, but to my certain knowledge 'wibbly wobbly' predates the Dr. Who series by at least 3 generations in my little corner of England, often being used to describe jelly or jell-o as you call it.

It's used to describe anything a that's bit rickety, insecure or unstable, however as the good Doctor himself most likely predates the TV series by thousands of light years, you may well be correct in your assumption... :grin:
 

middle.road

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#6
I've done some checking and it seems that some times even the mighty Google is just too young to know everything, but to my certain knowledge 'wibbly wobbly' predates the Dr. Who series by at least 3 generations in my little corner of England, often being used to describe jelly or jell-o as you call it.

It's used to describe anything a that's bit rickety, insecure or unstable, however as the good Doctor himself most likely predates the TV series by thousands of light years, you may well be correct in your assumption... :grin:
I was thinking (IIRC) that Matt Smith used that line quite a bit. Perhaps he put it to use drawing from his life. I believe it was used in his first episode when he was wolfing down custard at Amy's table. I would have to go watch the episode to determine if that is indeed correct.
:grin:
 

Dranreb

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#9
Now I'm worried :concerned:! Did you determine the cause of the break?
I reckon we need a pic of your bike ND :encourage:

It's a long story but I was attempting to salvage the clutch out of my vintage Chevy.

It had very bad grabbing on engagement, so I had it apart to find that someone with an even more over optimistic belief in their engineering abilities than me had been in there before, and built up the worn pressure lever and throw out sleeve parts with weld.

Some attempt had been made to grind them smooth in a rather random whittling sort of fashion.

Started with the throw out sleeve, found one hiding inside an old steel crankshaft, it took most of the day to hack it out of there!

Then I made a tight fitting pivot for the shaper table (my take on a poor mans shaper dividing head) fixed the previously marked out part down over it. cut the first slots, then turned it 90 deg using a square off a piece of metal cramped to the side of the table.

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All that went very well.

To be continued.....

Bernard
 

Dranreb

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#10
To clarify see pic, obviously no service stations in these parts that can do more than plug in a laptop.

28 Chevy clutch.jpg


These are the butchered pressure lever parts.

DSCF0932.jpg


DSCF0933.jpg


The setup to level the backs of the levers in order to have them lay flat when fixed the other way up, this pic was taken after I removed the backstop against the nearest end.

They where quite hard and the tool blunted quickly, but i managed to get them good enough for my purposes.

DSCF0946.jpg


I then turned them over and hand smoothed the working surfaces with oxide paper on a metal backer block, this worked quite well.

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Disaster struck when I was chipping away at the other end, slow speed taking tiny cuts, sacrificing the supporting collars.

You can just see the hold downs holding the other ends down onto a parallel to get the correct angle.

Look carefully at the first two levers on the left and you can just see the gouges where the tool dug in, something in the setup had started to move and I just wasn't quick enough to stop the shaper in time.

DSCF0951.jpg


Looking at the oil stains on the broken surfaces the part may have been about to let go for some time.

The tool was small with a lot of stick out to clear the hold downs and I would have thought the tool would snap before the shaper did.

Be careful out there chaps.

Bernard
 
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