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Carbide Tools With Shaper

January Project of the Month [3]
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benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
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#31
Hi Benny,
you are very lucky to have a 6" Pratt & Whitney, That is a very nice machine especially if it is the toolroom slotter, My slotting machine is a british Denham of Halifax 1940 machine war time finish, (only referred to the paintwork, It is a nicely built machine tool It is more conservative in design than the Pratt & Whitney, having flat belt cone pulley drive, However it is strong & useful.

As a small matter A friend of mine in Glasgow had a Pratt & Whitney tool room slotter Number 13 Which he used until his factory died in the early 1980/s I believe it went to Africa .I would imagine pretty early on in the batches of these pattern of toolroom slotters.
Yes, mine is a toolroom model with inclinable ram; mine is early wartime, with the nice paint finish, I think war finish started in 1943 over here. I have tool holders for the OK forged tools and the 6" vertical vise and adapted a dividing plate and sector crank so I can do dividing work as well as angular work. I am always surprised anew at how sensitive the feeds are; dial a thou, and it moves a thou.
I think the basic design of it goes back to at least the early 1920s I saw an early picture of one that was driven from overhead, but still had the geared speed change arrangement of the later ones like mine.
I also had a P&W #3 jig borer, which was given to me, it was handy for many jobs due to its capacity and ridgidity; the fellow who bought my business junked it --- sad!
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
1,156
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692
#33
BennyIf thats not a spelling error, what is a "sow block" please?

Cheers Phil
The sow block on a power hammer is an intermediate casting in between the machine frame and the actual bottom die; both the sow block and the die are held in place by tapered wedges like gibs that are hammered in place.
 
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