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Catapiller steel toe work books

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Glenn Brooks

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#1
Just bought a pair of Caterpillar (as in yellow bull dozer maker) steel toe lace up work boots at a Sears sidewalk sale. Cost one lathe buck -$100.

All I can say is Wow! Why did I wait so long. Don't let the machinery branded name throw you off. This model/style is actually, very, very, well made and inexpensive boots. All leather non insulated construction (ok a light inner lining). Slip resistant and heat resistant tread. Low profile, over ankle hook and lace tops. Very easy to lace and take off. I've found them comfortable, light weight, and easy to work in around the shop and out in the railroad yard. Ahaha. No more gritting teeth as welding slag burns through my synthetic running shoes at my ankles, or steel rems and tools bounce off the toes.

IMG_1445.JPG

Oops, gotta go now and find some more steel work to do - in my new boots!

Glenn
 
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Tozguy

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#2
Wow, nice boots. Don't forget to add them to your list of equipment.
 

Bob Korves

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#3
"Caterpillar"
caterpillar.com
 

Glenn Brooks

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"Caterpillar"
caterpillar.com
Bob, ahahahaha. Thanks! Didn't have a clue so,did my best. Could have looked at my photo if I'd A been thinking proper!

Gpb
 

Bob Korves

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Bob, ahahahaha. Thanks! Didn't have a clue so,did my best. Could have looked at my photo if I'd A been thinking proper!

Gpb
Sure enough, there it is! I sold (and bought) Cat parts for 36 years, so I knew how to spell it...
 

Randall Marx

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#6
Glad you like your new boots, Glen! I started wearing pull-on leather steel-toe boots several years ago. They are easier to put on and take off for me. The main reason, though, was that I got tired of burning the laces off when doing lots of welding. No laces - no burning of laces! :D
 

Tozguy

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And thanks for the reminder that hobbyists toes are just as valuable as any others. Will start back to wearing my old Dakotas.
 

wawoodman

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#8
Well, add me to the stupid list. Not only do I wear running shoes in both the wood and metal shops, but I have diabetic neuropathy in both feet. So I can't feel much of anything below my sock line. I don't know if I screwed up until I take off my socks before bed, and see the bruise. And my wife asks me what happened, and all I can do is shrug.
 

Glenn Brooks

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Mike, I have something similar, but so far mostly in the right foot. Ortho guy said to wear Brooks brand running shoes with purposely altered inserts to counter the walking on grate sensation in one foot. However, I've got tired of literally burning up $150 running shoes every three months in the shop - and it gets very expensive. Welding slag and cutting torch molten bits just go right though - doesn't even leave a hole some times - just burns out on my ankles and arches... So finally bite the bullet on these boots. Actually I think they are better than the athletic shoes-although I must have tried on every shoe on the planet over two days, at several shoe stores, to select this pair.

Wanted a pair of steeel toe high top Wellington slip on boots-but apparently they went out of style in 1965. Missed my chance!

Glenn
 

bfd

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when I worked in shops that everything needed a crane to lift it. steel toed boots were not required. why you ask? we were told that something heavy would fall and instead of just crushing your toes the steel cap would slice off all your toes instead. so I stayed away from steel toed shoes. sorry to be a downer on this but that is what I heard at southern California Edison. bill keep your toes out of the way
 

BrianT

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when I worked in shops that everything needed a crane to lift it. steel toed boots were not required. why you ask? we were told that something heavy would fall and instead of just crushing your toes the steel cap would slice off all your toes instead. so I stayed away from steel toed shoes. sorry to be a downer on this but that is what I heard at southern California Edison. bill keep your toes out of the way
Ive heard that too when I was working on industrial boilers. I didn't buy it and stuck w/ my steel toes back then. Ive looked at the "Caterpillar" boots while at Sears and Ive always passed only due to the name, seemed silly. Ive been dealing w/ Plantar Fasciitis for about a half year now, I wear mostly Redwing mixed with similar brands mixed in due to that. I usually rotate my boots daily so I will look at the Caterpillar boots again, Thanks for the review.
 

Uglydog

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#12
when I worked in shops that everything needed a crane to lift it. steel toed boots were not required. why you ask? we were told that something heavy would fall and instead of just crushing your toes the steel cap would slice off all your toes instead. so I stayed away from steel toed shoes. sorry to be a downer on this but that is what I heard at southern California Edison. bill keep your toes out of the way
This sounds like Urban Legend.
Check out: https://achesandjoints.org/2012/05/23/crush-injuries-to-the-forefoot/
We we can reasonably question "Myth Busters" as a credible source of research, as well as the author of this article and possible undisclosed interests/bias.
I'll look for more science if there is interest/need this is merely the first possibly credible source I found which had a pro/con documented position.

The fire and EMS service is awful for the offering resistance to change because "that's not how we do it" or, we've been doing it this way for X years. Tradition, culture and myth or legend does not make something correct. On the other hand I will also suggest that science doesn't automatically make it right or best.

Daryl
MN
 

ddickey

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#13
We all wear composite toes at work. Mostly because steel toes won't make it through the security metal detectors.
Anyone looking to buy work boots should check out Thorogood, made in the state of Wisconsin. Took a while to break mine in but I wear mine even when not at work.
http://www.weinbrennerusa.com/
 

Glenn Brooks

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Brian T, Caterpillar sells at least two different model boot. If you go looking at Cat brand, make sure you try both pair, or at lease be aware of this model. I did not like the first style Cat boot I tried on. Also stayed away from them because of name. Next day at Sears,more or less in desperation, saw these and liked them. The first pair had rather large toes and maybe were insulated. Can't remember. Anyway, the two pairs are notably different Construction. Ones I bought are more like hiking boots. They are turning out to be maybe the best boot I've ever worn.

I never wore steel tool before either, mostly because I was in Alaska. The steel toe draws the winter cold like crazy. So, no longer there and now figure this doesn't matter anymore. Now, My little hobbyshop parts and tools just bounce off and clatter on the floor. Fun stuff!

Glenn
 

Ulma Doctor

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#15
when I worked in shops that everything needed a crane to lift it. steel toed boots were not required. why you ask? we were told that something heavy would fall and instead of just crushing your toes the steel cap would slice off all your toes instead. so I stayed away from steel toed shoes. sorry to be a downer on this but that is what I heard at southern California Edison. bill keep your toes out of the way
I was an Ironworker for a couple years when i was a kid.
we were discouraged from wearing steel toe boots on most jobsites i was on
 

Ulma Doctor

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#16
Just bought a pair of Caterpillar (as in yellow bull dozer maker) steel toe lace up work boots at a Sears sidewalk sale. Cost one lathe buck -$100.
All I can say is Wow! Why did I wait so long. Don't let the machinery branded name throw you off. This model/style is actually, very, very, well made and inexpensive boots. All leather non insulated construction (ok a light inner lining). Slip resistant and heat resistant tread. Low profile, over ankle hook and lace tops. Very easy to lace and take off. I've found them comfortable, light weight, and easy to work in around the shop and out in the railroad yard. Ahaha. No more gritting teeth as welding slag burns through my synthetic running shoes at my ankles, or steel rems and tools bounce off the toes.
Oops, gotta go now and find some more steel work to do - in my new boots!
Glenn
Nice boots!
 

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#17
I've had a pair of Georgia Boots steel toes for years, had to have them to leave the office and go to the shop. But when up at a local shop rebuilding my backhoe the solvent spray ate the soles off of them. Had a local shoe repair resole them with Vibram brand soles and they are still going. Cost me the price of the Cat boots but they were hardly broke in when the soles went to the big floor in the sky.
One old boy on a radial drill bounced a 1/2 ton of steel of his steel toed boots and we caught him with a bar in a vise and his boot off and beating the dent out. Huummmm.

Jim
 

47convertible

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#18
We all wear composite toes at work. Mostly because steel toes won't make it through the security metal detectors.
Anyone looking to buy work boots should check out Thorogood, made in the state of Wisconsin. Took a while to break mine in but I wear mine even when not at work.
http://www.weinbrennerusa.com/
Second that on Thorogood. They make an extra wide in my size. Most others don't. Made in USA. Water resistant, anti slip and the composite toe. My only complaint is the little openings in the soles that help make them slip resistant, like siping tires on your truck, also seem to make a great nest for metal chips from the machine shop floor. So they gotta go on and come off in the garage --not on the wife's hardwood floors.
Jerry
 

Jim_Z

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I've had a pair of Georgia Boots steel toes for years, had to have them to leave the office and go to the shop. But when up at a local shop rebuilding my backhoe the solvent spray ate the soles off of them. Had a local shoe repair resole them with Vibram brand soles and they are still going. Cost me the price of the Cat boots but they were hardly broke in when the soles went to the big floor in the sky.
One old boy on a radial drill bounced a 1/2 ton of steel of his steel toed boots and we caught him with a bar in a vise and his boot off and beating the dent out. Huummmm.

Jim
Dittos on the disappearing soles, I was wearing and a pear of Red Wings with some some kind of cushioned sole at a friends motorcycle shop one day and the soles disintegrated in a couple hours. Never did figure out what the solvent was. Maybe Brake Cleaner or something similar. Good call on the Vibram soles.

Jim_Z
 

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#20
I wore steel toed boots for years most of the time if something fell it it's above the toe part. One time they saved my toes ,a guy driving a hard tire forklift ran over my foot crushed the steel thru the sole but saved my toes . I wanted to beat the crap out of him but was restrained. In a hurry not doing his job right got him fired. But I needed the job good thing I was a good boy then.
 

Jonno_G

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#21
About 20 years ago I worked for Caterpillar for a few years, in an engineering office at a manufacturing site the. Had to have steel toed boys to go out onto the assembly shop floor, so bought a pair of Caterpillar steel toed boots at an employee discount of about 50% (by the time you added in the company allowance for a cheaper pair of boots).

I wore those boots every day for the next seven years or so, and right up until the day I wore the soles through they were, and still are, the most comfortable boots I've ever owned!

Sent from my Lenovo YT3-X50F using Tapatalk
 

Jonno_G

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#22
*steel toed BOOTS*

Not boys....

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#23
Like others on here, I need composites to get through the metal detectors. I had a pair of red wings once, the most expensive boots I have ever bought and they were horrible. They never did brake in. They were uncomfortable until the day the soles wore through.
 

bfd

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#24
don't get me wrong, At the long beach naval shipyard where I served a 4 year apprenticeship we were required to wear steel toed shoes they had a shoe store right on the base and you could pay for the shoes right out of your paycheck does anyone remember thom maccanns shoes don't know about he spelling, but that is the kind they sold. then I went to Southern Calif. Edison and they didn't care if you wore steel toes or not. then to Pacific Gas and Electric where you had to pass through a metal detector every day no steel toed shoes unless you wanted to walk through security in your stocking feet and dust their floor for them but then they banned tennis shoes unless they were steel toed or composite toed carbon graphite toed shoes so in order to wear tennis shoes I switched to composite toed converse shoes like high priced tennis shoes. these shoes were comfortable and passed through security the history of my shoe wearing sage is sure boring bill
 

Glenn Brooks

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#25
Like others on here, I need composites to get through the metal detectors. I had a pair of red wings once, the most expensive boots I have ever bought and they were horrible. They never did brake in. They were uncomfortable until the day the soles wore through.

Yep, me to. Except I took them back to the Red wing dealer the day after I bought them - couldn't walk 75 yards on concrete without my knees hurting and feet hurting. That's what drove me to stop in at Sears and try on the cat-er-pillars. Saved $75 on price and vastly improved comfort. Couldn't believe how expensive the Red Wings are and how poorly their soles are made.
 

ddickey

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#26
I've had a few Red Wing Composites. Made in China junk really. Probably fine for most but I'm on my feet a great deal and they don't pass the test.
Red Wing still make some quality shoes right here in town, but composites aren't one of them.
I've heard aluminum toed boots make it through the metal detectors, don't know for sure though.
 

Bob Korves

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#27
In the 1970-80's period, my employer required steel toed boots in the shop and gave us a $70 voucher every 6 months to buy them, and the voucher was only good at one provider. I worked in the parts department, and shoes lasted a long time there compared to the guys working the shop floor. Nice USA made leather boots in many styles including Wellingtons and hiking style boots were available around the $70 voucher level from the provider's store in those days, and I always made sure to buy those boots, which became a perk of employment. I still have several pair of those boots, new in the boxes...
 

ddickey

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#28
That's a great deal compared to what we have. $125/year. Although we can use it for any company.
Can anyone relate to this pic? IMG_20170409_100933445.jpg
 

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#29
Most of the people I know who work around hot/heavy metal (blacksmiths and foundryfolk) wear metatarsal boots. They're steel or composite toed, but also have an outer armor plate over the instep of the boot as well. Like >these<. Much better protection than your average reinforced-toe boot.
 

Randall Marx

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I know steel-toed wellingtons are not easy to find anymore, but they are available still. That's what I wear almost constantly. The last pair I bought are from Wolverine and are quite comfy. They seem to be holding up pretty well so far, but were not cheap. Better than replacing laces every other week or so!
The crushing of steel toes is not an urban legend, either. My father, in about 1972-3, was wearing them when something heavy crushed the steel toe into his foot. He had to balance on the other foot while squeezing the crushed toe in his bench vise, sideways, to get his foot out of the boot. Fortunately, the crushed steel toe didn't amputate his toes for him, but it was close. I don't work around anything heavy enough to cause that type of problem, so the steel toes do provide protection from stuff that would hurt.
 
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