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Changing bearing oil?

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Gfrost

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#1
I have a Tida 10x36 TD5a that is a belt drive.

The only areas that get oil are the spindle bearing, but I don't see any drain plugs?
How do I drain the oil that is in there and put new in? I want to change it because the chuck side looks darker in color than the outboard side.

Is it feasible to pull the sight windows out and drain them there?


Gary
 

Dave Paine

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#4
I have a Grizzly G9249 lathe, also a belt drive. It also does not have drain plugs for the headstock oil. I would have to remove the sight windows to drain the oil. This will be messy since it will likely run all over the gearbox. Need lots of paper towel.
 
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Gfrost

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#6
Yeah, I thought of that as a last resort. Very small holes, probably only a 1/4" or smaller holes!
 

Gfrost

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#7
I will try the sight windows, and yes that will likely be messy!!
 

Charles Spencer

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#8
Why not open the top use a turkey baster to suck up or a pump. Fill to desired level. Then you can do a visual on your gear train.
I did something similar on my lathe and then finished swabbing it out with pipe cleaners. Also being a cheap S.O.B. they were used pipe cleaners I had dried out.
 

Gfrost

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#10
I haven't done it yet but those sight windows come out easily, so that will be the way.
Thinking that I will get a couple of solo cups and cut the rounded rim off and duct tape them just under the hole and pull the plug:encourage:


Gary
 

whitmore

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#11
Why not open the top use a turkey baster to suck up or a pump.
You can probe through the fill holes with a thin tube (probaby not a soda straw, but something
stiffer, like nylon or teflon) while pumping. Raising oil (specific gravity lower than water) by a foot or
so doesn't require much vacuum, so lots of pumps would work: a chem lab aspirator (runs off water
flow), or a mity-vac, or a surplus copy machine pump, would suffice.

Maybe even a vacuum cleaner (but they don't cool properly with high vacuum and low airflow).
The oil oughtn't hit the pump, though, just take air out of a glass bottle, through hole #1 of a two-hole cork,
and let the oil come in hole #2.

Vinyl tubing (Tygon or similar) with a thick wall is good for vacuum or oil; most auto parts stores
have something suitable in stock.

Inexpensive bicycle pumps use a one-way valve in the stem: fit a reversed valve (and reverse the
leather-cup seal in the piston), and they do a dandy job of pumping a vacuum. I've modified
one of mine by soldering a Schraeder valve body (from an old inner tube) where the floppy stem tube went.
Then, put the floppy stem tube onto the Schraeder fitting, and... vacuum!
 
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