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Cincinnati 2mi Made In Uk

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roverguy

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#1
cinci-1.jpg cinci-2.jpg Hi from Australia

I have an old Cinci 2MI horizontal mill, the universal model - 5hp single motor . It has a plate on it- MADE IN BIRMINGHAM UK .

I have been looking for a manual for it but no luck so far .

It came out of a school here . Are there many 2MI models around in the USA ?

I will post some pics soon . Regards Mike

cinci-2.jpg
 
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wrat

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#2
Nice find!

If you're new to this sort of machine, perhaps a manual is not a bad idea. Otherwise, it's just like everyone else's horizontal. More than once a supervisor has told me "You run this job on that one tonight" and it'd look something like your machine (in a room of 50 similar machines) without manual or instruction.

You must've hired a cartage company to move that thing. It's gotta be 4K lbs or better.

You got away with several premium parts that are often lost. In fact, you have several bits that i need for my similar machine.

You have the table stops. I don't know what happened during my absence from production machining, but those things are GONE. Many machines even have the grooves busted out. Haven't been able to find those anywhere.

You have the overarm support. Those are often lost, though not as often in strictly horizontal machines.

You have the PTO gearbox (at the RH end of the table). This will allow you to run a rotary table or indexing head from the power feed of the machine. Been known to make some interesting and even intricate cuts.

You got away with an arbor full of spacers. Probably original equipment, too. Always a nice touch because they're brutal to replace.

You're missing the cross slide handwheel. You have the vertical crank, though. But it looks like they may have used the crank for both directions.

You even have the overarm star wheel. Those disappear with some bothersome regularity.

Sorry i don't have a manual. There are several on this list that have far more specific model knowledge than myself. Any generic horizontal manual for Cinci of KT would be a good start.

Best of lucks,

Wrat
 

Mark in Indiana

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#3
Mike,
That's a great looking mill you have. They are truly a pleasure to run, like an antique tractor. The sound that they make are more soothing than the purring of a kitten.

It takes some time on the internet, but you should be able to download a manual or two that will give you some information and fun facts. Otherwise, just run it, like Wrat said.

I'll do some digging about some recommended modern oils and lubricants and post it ( if you need so ).
Also, if you could post the serial number of your machine, I could tell you about it (age, type, etc) if the number code is the same as what was made in the states.
 

brino

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#4
Hi Mike,

That looks like a great machine! Congratulations.
Any idea the age?

I have an older model a "3S" with the round over-arm, built in 1916. I put some pictures here:
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/gallery/albums/my-1916-cincinnati-3s-milling-machine.364/
(hopefully that link works!)

Several nope over a dozen years ago now (holy crap!) when I was trying to get mine running I did find some manuals that were way to "new" for me. I'll need to dig thru my hard copy and PDF collections.

At the time I was also able to get some info directly from Cincinnati; things like where to look for serial number, shipping weight, recommended oils, etc.
I can post some of that info too, when I get home.

On mine the serial number was stamped in the middle of the vertical dovetail ways just below the spindle hole.

Is the spindle a B&S #11?
Did they make a vertical head for that model? Do you have one?

-brino
 

brino

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roverguy

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#6
Hi Guys

Thank you for the replies . You guys do have the experience and the know how of these big old machines like the Cinci MI .

Yes the controls are pretty easy to understand . I do like the way you can pull out the three major assemblies for maintenance .

Thanks Brino, for those manual downloads . I will look up the serial number tonight . The Spindle is actually a 50 standard taper . The 3s is a really nice machine also , looks more like a antique ! Have you got the 3S up and running ? I see you got some change gears with it . 1916 is during WW1 .

I didn't get a vertical head with the MI , wish I did but I will look for one .

I almost bought a UK made Parkinson which came with the vertical head and other attachments , the dividing head .

Yes I paid a guy here to move it for me , it worked out OK .
 

brino

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#7
Mike,

I found this one in my hard-copy collection:
ScreenShot013.jpg
I searched around "the web" for an existing PDF copy and found nothing for free.
A few sites were more than willing to sell a PDF copy of this document that they do NOT own the rights to for $100.
That irks me......so I just started scanning it.
It is 150 pages, I will try to have it uploaded within the next few days.
-brino
 

roverguy

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#8
Hi Brino

Hey you are a champion ! I cannot thank you enough for doing that .

Yes I have seen the PDF version and it is very expensive . Makes you wonder about the copyright laws !

I guess you have snow on the ground there in Ontario ? Keep warm !

Mike
 

brino

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#9
Okay, I got it scanned and it looks great.......the only problem is that it ended up around 240MB in size.
The upload limit here is 50MB.

I know I had a tool to shrink the size of PDF files (I used it on at least one of the manuals above in post #5).
However, I had a computer die....I do have backups, but apparently have not re-installed all my applications.
I'll have to figure that out again.

-brino
 

FOMOGO

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#11
That's quite the chunk of iron you've got there, should serve you well. I had a chance to pick up a 1936 model for $200 in Denver last year, but just didn't have time for the 6hr round trip as there was just too much going on. the guy said last chance before it goes to scrap. I felt bad, hope someone closer was able to take it. Mike
 

brino

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#12
Hey roverguy,

I had to try a couple different things to get it down below the 50.5MB file limit, but I got there!

Here's a link to the download page:
http://hobby-machinist.com/resources/cincinnati-milling-machine-2ml-2mi-3mi-service-and-parts.2852/

I have paged thru it so I believe I have no missing or duplicate pages.
I also believe that the compressing did NOT sacrifice quality.
Please let me know if you see anything wrong.
I still have the original, and I'm willing to fix it if required.

Please feel free to share it around and even upload to other sites.

-brino
 

roverguy

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#13
Brino

Fantastic , I will print it out at the library and have it wire bound in town. They place clear plastic covers on it as well.

Thank you for the help , I will have the old iron relic making chips in no time !
 

roverguy

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#14
Hi

I have been reading the manual . Most interesting . I plan on draining the oil and cleaning the filters .

I would like to know which modern type of hydraulic oils to use ? Is there a modern equivalent ?

Mark in Indiana - the serial nr on this MI does not appear to match up with the USA made MI's
 

roverguy

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Hi

I have been reading the manual . Most interesting . I plan on draining the oil and cleaning the filters .

I would like to know which modern type of hydraulic oils to use ? Is there a modern equivalent ?

Mark in Indiana - the serial nr on this MI does not appear to match up with the USA made MI's
 

brino

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#16
roverguy,

Back when I was digging for info I hit the "parts" email link at the bottom of the page here:
http://www.cinmac.com/
I sent a message about my old machine, but they could do nothing without a serial number and advised me where to find it.
You should try that too.

Once I had my serial number they could answer some of my questions. Below is that email exchange
(it has been slightly "redacted" to keep email addresses private)

Mine was so old it had no pressurized oiling system, instead oil cups, sight glass drip-feed oilers, and various "gits" type oilers.

I now buy 19L buckets of ISO 32 "Anti-Wear Hydraulic Oil" for about $50 from the local tractor supply place.
I use that for everything on the mill: dovetail ways, spindle, gears, chain-drive, etc.

-brino

=========================================================
brino
Thank you for supplying the Machine Serial Number. I have
forwarded your inquiry to our Technical Services Department and they
have responded to your questions, for your Cincinnati #3 Universal Mill
(Serial Number: A819-K---------):
1) When was this machine made? 1916

2) How much does it weigh? 11,000 pounds

3) What oil should I use in the various oil cups and tubes? ISO HL-46

4) What taper is the horizontal spindle? and the vertical spindle?
11 Brown & Sharpe

5) Can I still get operation and maintenance manuals for it (even just
photocopies)? Due to the age of the machine manuals are not available.

6) Can I get exploded diagrams/parts lists (even just photocopies)? Due
to the age of the machine diagrams and parts lists are not available.

7) If I find I need parts are there any still available through
Cincinnati Machine? Are there any other sources? We do offer parts and
technical support for the machine, but again due to the age of the
machine, many are not inventoried and the cost to procure these parts
may be more than the customer paid for the machine in total. It is
recommended that the customer contact Cincinnati for the parts needed
and we can quote the information to them. There are probably used parts
houses that sell used or retrofitted parts for machines of this type,
however, we do not know who they are or where they are located.
You may call our 1-800 number (1-800-934-0735) and ask to speak with
a Service Parts Customer Service Agent, or Technical Service Agent and
they will be happy to speak with you regarding your machine.
I hope this information will be of assistance to you.

Have a good weekend.
Regards,
Cincinnati Machine
Cincinnati, Ohio


-----Original Message-----
From: brino
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2003 9:30 PM
To: Cincinnati
Subject: Re: E-commerce E-mail Request

Good news, I finally have the machine in my garage! I am starting to
clean it up and have found the serial number. It hasn't been used in
quite a few years, but it's in good shape. I have all the levers for
cutter and feed rates moving, and I can turn the fly-wheel by hand and
see the spindle and drive shafts turn. I have cleaned and oiled the
overarm it now moves fairly easily. All the dovetail slides also move
well. It came with a 2hp motor that I've cleaned and tested. I also have
the 90 degree head to convert it to a vertical mill.

As I said before it's a model "3S" vertical/horizontal mill the serial
number is "A819". There is a "K" under the serial number, I'm not sure
if it's part of the serial number or some other reference.

Here's a few things I'd like to find out:

1) When was this machine made?
2) How much does it weigh?(our estimate while moving it was 4 tons)
3) What oil should I use in the various oil cups and tubes?
4) What taper is the horizontal spindle? and the vertical spindle?
5) Can I still get operation and maintenance manuals for it?(even just
photocopies)
6) Can I get exploded diagrams/parts lists?(even just photocopies)
7) If I find I need parts are there any still available through
Cincinnati Machine? Are there any other sources?

I am very excited to have found this valuable tool.
I hope to have it operational soon and for many years to come.

Thanks for your help.
brino

"Cincinnati" wrote:

> brino,
> Thank you for your request. In order to assist you more fully I
> have been asked to inquire if you can supply the Machine Serial Number
> from the machine in question. Per our Tech Service Dept:
>
> "It should be located on the front of table, toward the right
> end, or on the column below the horizontal spindle. The serial number
> will be stamped in to the iron, not on a tag."
> We will need to know the serial number in order to insure that
> you receive the correct information for your machine.
> Upon receipt of the Machine Serial Number, I will forward your request
> back to the proper department so that you may be assisted.
>
> I look forward to your reply.
> Regards,
> Cincinnati Machine
> Cincinnati, Ohio
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: brino
> Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2003 10:33 PM
> To: Cincinnati
> Subject: This message originated from your Showroom on MMS Online.
>
> From: brino
> I have recently purchased an older Cincinnati
> milling machine. I am hoping to find any information I can on the
> machine. Ideally operation, maintenance and an exploded diagram/parts
> list, but anything even just the year of manufacture would help in my
> search.
>
> It is a model "3S" vertical/horizontal mill.
> I didn't see a serial number on it, should there be one?
> Is the year of manufacture in the serial number?
> Thanks for any help you can provide!
===========================================================
 

roverguy

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#17
Hi B

Ok that info is great . I did some research and the oil viscosity recommended in the 2MI manual works out to be ISO 45 for the column and ISO 32 for the table unit . I can buy ISO tractor oils here no problem .

Ok the serial nr. info. Very good service from the Cinci company .

Are you planning on running the 2hp motor in the old 3S ? 2hp seems a little low but I guess you are not doing big cuts . My MI has a 5hp motor , rather big for a single phase supply and a VFD to handle .

I have a Indian made Lister diesel and a 3KVA 240V alternator on it , I was planning on using it to power the MI and my Hendey lathe . Mike
 

brino

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#18
Are you planning on running the 2hp motor in the old 3S ?
Yes I have been using it for a few years now.....and you're right I have never taken massive cuts like shown in some of the old Cincinnati literature.

-brino
 

brino

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#19
Hi Mike,

How is it going with the "new" mill?
Are you making chips?

-brino
 

roverguy

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#20
Hi Brino

And thank you for asking . I have been busy doing other stuff , I did ask around for a dividing head for the 2MI , but no luck so far . I found a copy of the Cincinnati treatise , the 1951 edition .

Have you been running the 3S much lately ?? If so what do you make with it ?

I should fess up and let you know that my shed is full of old iron , lathes , mills and more .

Making ships you say . The polititians here are all worked up over our new submarines , they were talking about Japan making them . The last lot of subs we got were duds designed in Sweden , they made too much noise underwater and they were considered to be unsafe by some . Mike
 

brino

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#21
Hi Mike,

my shed is full of old iron , lathes , mills and more .
If you ever want to post some pictures I know many people here would be interested to see your collection.

Have you been running the 3S much lately ?? If so what do you make with it ?
I believe the most recent were an indicator holder for the lathe carriage(http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/craftsman-12-carriage-stop.41176/#post-354318) and to reduce the square neck on a carriage bolt for another project.

Making ships you say
That was a typo. I meant "chips". You are definitely quick on the draw, because I thought I had fixed it fairly soon after posting.

The polititians here are all worked up over our new submarines , they were talking about Japan making them . The last lot of subs we got were duds designed in Sweden , they made too much noise underwater and they were considered to be unsafe by some
I guess some things are universal. Some years ago our federal government had bought a number of used submarines from the British Navy, but I do not think they ever worked right. There was a fire on one just trying to get it here!

Take care.
-brino
 
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