Clamp for height gauge scriber?

Mill Lee farm

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Hello all,
So I got myself a decent Kanon vernier height gauge but it came without a scribe or clamp.
I sourced the .35” scribe from Shars no problem but I can’t seem to find a camp anywhere.

Can anyone point me in the right direction or maybe have a spare clamp they’d like to sell?

OD of the gauge clamping arm is .55”-.56” high by .35” wide

1628957742058.jpeg
 

Toolmaker51

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I agree, provided you have suitable equipment, make one. Home shop machinists only advance their abilities going beyond the comfort zone. There is no pattern or design requirement. If you have a mill, and can do small tapping, here is one solution. Mill a open pocket in a thin squared up block. Drill and tap 4 corners, to ''cover'' that opening, with stock about 1/16th thick. Drill the top for clamp screw, about #4 to #6 SHCS topped with a Shear-Loc knob.
 

Toolmaker51

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Note.
In purchasing a clamp, care is required. Few brands are interchangeable, correct width that fits arm or height to accommodate arm and size of scriber (or indicator holders etc).
 

pacifica

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Hello all,
So I got myself a decent Kanon vernier height gauge but it came without a scribe or clamp.
I sourced the .35” scribe from Shars no problem but I can’t seem to find a camp anywhere.

Can anyone point me in the right direction or maybe have a spare clamp they’d like to sell?

OD of the gauge clamping arm is .55”-.56” high by .35” wide

View attachment 375291
I have one identical to that and needed a part-had to make it. they still sell the height gauges but not parts.
 

Mill Lee farm

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Yes, the HHiP clamp *almost* fits but is just too short....
My stack up is .91
Do you think I could file the .11-.20 out of the top? I don't know how much room I need to leave.
It might be better to use this as a starting point instead of 100% fabrication?
1629109527151.png

I've been considering attempting to make one but yes, it would be pushing my abilities. Not against the attempt though! Agree that's the only way to learn. Squaring the block is a great job for my new to me Atlas 7" shaper! I have a good drill press with a passable vice but no mill for the precision drilling. Wish I had a tiny milling attachment for my 6" Atlas lathe...

My big problem is a lack of good files. I'm not sure the Harbor freight needle file set is up to the task. It seems a good 1/4" square file is what I'd be looking for here?

Center punch the four corners of the ID rectangle and drill with as small a drill as practicle? (suggstions? 1/16"?)
Try to drill the meat out with a 5/16" etc and file down whats left? I need a die filer! :D
drill option 1.jpg

Or would it be beter to try to chase the ID perimiter with a 1/16" drill to try to open a rough rectangle?
drill option 2.jpg

I apologize for my horrible MSpaint drawings.... but honestly my part won't look much better! HA!

Can anyone reccomend a good but hobby priced source for files? I know I'll need them anyway going forward
 

BGHansen

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I'd make it using your first sketch. I'd layout the part and scribe an arc into the rectangular hole at the radius of your drill bit. Then center punch the hole on that arc at a 45 deg. angle from the corner if that makes sense. That'll put the edge of the drill bit right on the corner of the hole. If you are using cold-rolled steel, you could probably get away with a 1/16" drill bit with a lot of careful pecking. The hole will likely drift off center. I'd go with a 3/32" or 1/8" myself.

You could do it with your sketch and use a file to get the holes square in the corners.

Then finish up with a larger drill to clean out the center as you pictured. Lastly, clean up the center with an end mill. Great job on your solution!

Bruce
 

Mill Lee farm

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Thanks Bruce.
Are you suggesting an endmill in my drill press by hand? I don't have milling ability yet. (also not sure my drill press is fast enough?)
 

BGHansen

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If you don't have a mill, you'll need to drill and file. I'd go to more of your 2nd sketch with that being the method.

Regarding speeds, Tom Griffin of "Tom's Techniques" has a nice video on recommended speeds. He simplifies it to the formula (for steel) to:

400 / x

Where X is the diameter of the work if turning in the lathe or the cutter/drill diameter if spinning the cutting tool. For a 1/2" end mill, that works out to 400 / 0.5 or 800 RPM. Double that for a 1/4" end mill or 1600 RPM. Those are recommendations based off from production set-ups. You can still remove material at 200 RPM's with a 1/4" end mill, but would need to slow down your feed rate accordingly.

Bruce
 
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